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Creatures

You are not alone in the universe. In the Starfinder Roleplaying Game, strange new creatures and cultures await your party of adventurers on every new planet and space station. Whether you’re on a routine trading mission in the most familiar sectors of the Pact Worlds or exploring never-before-contacted planets out in the mysterious reaches of the Vast, Starfinder is a game about aliens—playing them, fighting them, and everything in between.

Starfinder Alien Archive presents a sampling of such aliens, designed both for Game Masters to use in crafting challenging encounters and adventures and for players to use in creating and customizing the perfect characters. It’s also a font of setting information and cultural details on the melting pot of different worlds that is Starfinder’s home galaxy. In order to fully use the creatures in this codex, you’ll need a copy of the Starfinder Core Rulebook, or you can find that book’s rules online for free at paizo.com/sfrd.

Not all of the creatures in this book are aliens in the traditional sense—after all, everyone’s an alien to someone else, and who’s to say you’re not just as bizarre to a gelatinous barathu as it is to you? Some of the species detailed here are key members of the Pact Worlds, being almost as familiar to the average citizen as the races presented in the Starfinder Core Rulebook. Others—angels, devils, and fey, for example—are from realms beyond mortal ken. Still others are old mythological favorites like dragons and elementals, familiar to players of the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and other fantasy RPGs but updated to Starfinder’s rules. Appendix 4: Universal Creature Rules explains all those rules which are common among the various entries in this book.

This book is only a small sampling of the myriad creatures found in the Starfinder campaign setting. For more, see the Starfinder Adventure Path volumes and other supplements, or quickly and easily import monsters from the Pathfinder RPG Bestiary volumes into your Starfinder game using the rules from the Pathfinder Legacy chapter of the Starfinder Core Rulebook. Best of all, this book’s Appendix 1: Creating Monsters and Other NPCs presents a robust creature-creation system that GMs can use to create monsters and nonplayer characters of literally any species they can imagine, while Appendix 3: Simple Template Grafts lets GMs modify existing creatures on the fly to better fit their party’s level and situation.

But Alien Archive doesn’t stop at creatures! This book also presents a ton of alien technology such as armor, magic items, weapons, and more that are perfect for rewarding or customizing player characters, sprinkled throughout their respective creature entries. And Appendix 2: Summoning Creatures offers spellcasters rules for summoning creatures in combat, allowing you to bring even more aliens to your table!

There’s a whole galaxy out there, full of creatures to fight or befriend. Are you ready?

Racial Traits and Alien PCs

Part of the fun of any science fantasy game is playing bizarre alien races, and in Starfinder, we want groups to have as many playable creature options as possible. As a result, many of the creature entries in this book include racial traits—rules that players can use to build characters of these races. In many cases, these racial abilities are scaled-back versions of the full monster abilities; this is because opponents run by the GM (both monsters and nonplayer characters) are created using a different rules system than player characters, but also because it allows us to present a wide array of potential playable races that might otherwise be too powerful. Even so, these abilities can still add complications to the game, and it’s always up to the GM to decide whether to allow player characters of these races. The GM can also opt to treat non-humanoid player races as humanoids for the purposes of spells and other abilities to offset some of these complications.

How to Read a Stat Block

The following section breaks down how to read a creature’s statistics, also called a stat block. Not all creatures have all of the information listed below. If a monster has any entries that aren’t explained here or that differ from the normal class features and other rules for characters presented in the Starfinder Core Rulebook, you’ll find them explained fully either at the end of the stat block under Special Abilities or in Appendix 4: Universal Creature Rules, where rules that appear in multiple monster entries have been compiled for easy reference. Both monsters and nonplayer characters (NPCs) have stat blocks, and you’ll learn how to build both of them in Appendix 1: Creating Monsters and Other NPCs.

Name and CR: The creature’s name is presented along with its Challenge Rating (CR), a numerical representation of the creature’s relative power. Challenge Rating is explained in detail on page 389 of the Starfinder Core Rulebook, but as a general rule, monsters with a CR equal to the average level of the characters in your party is about right for them to fight—if the CR is too high, it’ll be too difficult, and if it’s too low, it won’t be a fun challenge anymore.

XP: This is the total number of experience points the player characters (PCs) earn for defeating the creature. Note that this is the total for the party, not each character!

Race and Grafts: All creatures have a race entry. Some creatures are also built with class or template grafts, giving them more abilities (see Appendix 1 for more information). If this entry lists “variant,” the creature is an altered version of the base creature, beyond gaining different special abilities or class grafts. If this entry lists “unique,” the creature is the only one of its kind.

Alignment, Size, Type, and Subtype: A creature’s listed alignment represents the norm for such creatures; an individual’s can vary as you require for the needs of your campaign. A creature’s size determines its space and reach. Some innate abilities come from the creature’s type and subtype.

Init, Senses, and Perception: This lists the creature’s initiative modifier, followed by its special senses (omitted if it doesn’t have any). Its Perception modifier is listed here instead of in its Skills entry (see below).

Aura: If the creature has a magical or exceptional aura, it is listed here along with its radius from the creature and the save DC to resist the aura’s effects, where applicable.

HP and RP: These entries list the creature’s Hit Points and (if it uses them) its Resolve Points.

EAC and KAC: The creature’s Energy Armor Class and Kinetic Armor Class are listed here. Fort, Ref, and Will: The creature’s Fortitude, Reflex, and Will saving throw modifiers are listed here, followed by situational modifiers to those rolls.

Defensive Abilities, DR, Immunities, Resistances, and SR: If the creature has any defensive abilities, damage reduction (DR), immunities, resistances, or spell resistance (SR), they’re listed here.

Weaknesses: This lists the creature’s weaknesses, if any.

Speed: This notes the creature’s speed, followed by any additional speeds and types of movement the creature has. If the creature has a fly speed, the source of its fly speed (whether extraordinary, supernatural, or from another source such as an item) is given, followed by its maneuverability.

Melee: The creature’s melee attacks are listed here, each starting on a separate line. The attack roll modifier appears after the attack’s name, followed by the attack’s damage, damage type, and critical effects in parentheses.

Multiattack: If the creature can make multiple melee attacks with a full action (usually with different weapons), the attacks and attack roll modifiers are listed in this entry, followed by each attack’s damage, damage type, and critical effects in parentheses.

Ranged: This entry lists the creature’s ranged attacks in the same format the Melee entry uses for melee attacks. Space and Reach: The creature’s space and reach are noted here if they are other than a 5-foot square and 5 feet (those values are the default). Any special reach (from weapons or the like) is listed in parentheses.

Offensive Abilities: This entry lists abilities the creature is likely to use offensively.

Spell-Like Abilities: After noting the caster level of the creature’s spell-like abilities, this section lists the creature’s spell-like abilities (and the associated saving throw DCs, where relevant), organized by the number of times per day it can use each ability.

Spells Known: If the creature can cast spells (usually due to a mystic or technomancer class graft), its caster level is shown in this entry, followed by the spells it knows (and the associated saving throw DCs, where applicable) and how many spell slots of each level it has available per day. Often, only the creature’s most powerful spells are listed here.

Ability Score Modifiers: The creature’s ability score modifiers (rather than the scores themselves) are listed here. Feats: Only feats that give situational bonuses or allow for special combat tactics are listed in monster stat blocks. Feats that give the creature a static bonus (such as Improved Initiative) are already factored into the creature’s statistics, and they are therefore not listed. Skills: The creature’s skills are listed here alphabetically with their modifiers. Creatures are assumed to have whatever tools they need to use the listed skills (such as Engineering) without a penalty.

Languages: The languages most commonly understood and spoken by the creature are noted here, along with any other special means of communication (such as telepathy). You can swap out the languages known for other choices as needed.

Other Abilities: This entry lists abilities and features the creature has that aren’t covered in another line. Gear and Augmentations: This entry details the gear and augmentations the creature has, which can be altered to suit your needs.

Environment: The regions and climates in which the creature is typically encountered are listed here, though you’re welcome to use the creature in different environments.

Organization: This entry describes typical groupings for this creature type and whether such groups include any other types of creatures. Special Abilities: All of the creature’s unusual abilities are detailed in this section.

Aeon Guard

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 3 XP: 800

LE Medium humanoid (human)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +8

Defense

HP: 48

EAC: 19 KAC: 22

Fort: +5 Ref: +3 Will: +4

Offense

Speed: 20 ft.

Melee: thunderstrike pulse gauntlet +8 (1d6+5 B & So; critical knockdown)

Ranged: AG assault rifle +11 (1d8+3 P) or frag grenade II +11 (explode [15 ft., 2d6 P, DC 14]) or incendiary grenade I +11 (explode [5 ft., 1d6 F plus 1d4 burn, DC 14])

Offensive Abilities: fighting styles (sharpshoot), sniper’s aim

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +4 Con: +1 Wis: +1 Int: +1 Cha: +1

Skills: Athletics +8, Intimidate +8, Profession (soldier) +8, Stealth +10

Languages: Azlanti

Gear: AG trooper battle dress (clear spindle aeon stone, jump jets), AG assault rifle with 4 magazines (100 longarm rounds), thunderstrike pulse gauntlet with 2 batteries, frag grenade II, incendiary grenade I

Ecology

Environment: any (Azlanti Star Empire)

Organization: fire team (3–6), squad (7–12), strike team (7–12 Aeon Guards plus 1 Aeon Guard specialist), or troop (21–48 Aeon Guards plus 1 Aeon Guard specialist)

Description

The powerful Azlanti Star Empire maintains its hold on its subject systems through the might of its military, which is divided into two arms: the Imperial Fleet and the Aeon Guard. Aeon Guards are the elite infantry of the Star Empire; they serve as marines aboard the warships of the Imperial Fleet, protect imperial government and military installations, quell dissent and crush rebellions, and spearhead invasions to conquer and occupy new territories for the Star Empire.

Aeon Guards swear personal oaths of loyalty to the Aeon Throne, and only death in service to the empire can release them from their duty. Only humans are accepted into the ranks of the Aeon Guard, and all of them must be paragons of the Azlanti race.

Aeon Guards are readily identifiable by their distinctive armor, which incorporates the magic of the empire’s legendary aeon stones, and many are given cybernetic and biotechnological augmentations in addition to their standard-issue gear. The Aeon Guard stat block on page 6 represents a rank-and-file trooper who can be found almost anywhere within the Azlanti Star Empire or on one of its starships. Aeon Guard specialists are capable of operating for weeks or even months at a time with little or no support, carrying out secretive missions of espionage, infiltration, reconnaissance, or sabotage.

Ahav

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 12 XP: 19,200

N Huge construct (technological)

Init.: +8 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision, sensor suite Perception: +27

Defense

HP: 200

EAC: 26 KAC: 28

Fort: +12 Ref: +12 Will: +9

Offense

Speed: 60 ft.

Melee:

Ranged: medium machine gun +26 (3d10+12 P) or hellhound-class flamethrower +26 (4d6+12 F; critical burn 4d6)

Offensive Abilities:

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +8 Con: - Wis: +4 Int: -2 Cha: +2

Skills: Stealth +22

Languages: Common

Gear: hellhound-class flamethrower with 2 high-capacity petrol tanks, medium machine gun with 420 heavy rounds

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary or unit (1 AHAV plus 10–12 soldiers)

Special Abilities

MODEL (Ex) An AHAV is created with one of the Mission Dependent Loadouts, or MODELs, listed below. MODELs are intended to allow AHAVs to serve in a variety of roles. This list is not exhaustive; the GM is free to design other MODELs at her discretion.

Advanced Maneuverability: The AHAV has an extraordinary fly speed of 60 feet (perfect maneuverability) and the Spring Attack feat.

Autoloader: When the AHAV makes a full attack with its medium machine gun, it can make up to three attacks instead of two attacks. It takes a –5 penalty to these attacks instead of a –4 penalty.

Camouflage Plating: The AHAV gains a +20 enhancement bonus to Stealth checks.

Harrying Arms: The AHAV has numerous pistols or other small arms mounted to its chassis. As a full action, the AHAV automatically succeeds at the harrying fire action against every enemy within 60 feet.

Ram: The AHAV gains a slam attack with a +23 attack bonus that deals 6d4+17 bludgeoning damage. If the AHAV hits with this attack after a charge, the target is also knocked back 30 feet. If the target is blocked from moving the full distance, it takes an additional 1d6 bludgeoning damage per 10 feet it can’t move.

Sensor Suite (Ex) As a full action, an AHAV can gain one of the following benefits for 1 minute: blindsight (life), blindsight (vibration), sense through (vision), or a +10 enhancement bonus to Perception checks. It can change which benefit it receives as a full action. At the GM’s discretion, an AHAV might have access to more options, such as blindsight (emotion) or blindsight (thought).

Description

Military marvels of advanced weaponry and artificial- personality programming, AHAVs are ruthless machines of war, bound by their programming to follow their objectives without pause. The acronym AHAV stands for “autonomous heavy assault vehicle,” reflecting the constructs’ ability to operate independently and make basic decisions on the battlefield. While the term originated with a specific and popular early model produced by Ironfire Industries on Absalom Station shortly after the Gap, the name quickly spread in colloquial use to refer to all robotic war machines of similar designs, and these days many corporations on many different worlds use the term to market their own proprietary models. AHAVs are built to appear intimidating: sturdy armor-plated tanks that float on hovertreads, armed with various heavy weapons and bristling with antennae. AHAVs have a full complement of sensors, capable of detecting heat, vibration, and sometimes other signatures, though they don’t usually have enough processing power to activate every available sense at once.

AHAVs are expensive and difficult to construct, so relatively few of them are found in the service of small planetary militaries and mercenary groups. Only the richest of worlds (and collectors interested in ensuring the safety of their private collections) can afford to purchase and maintain even a single AHAV.

Unfortunately, since AHAVs’ basic programming leaves little room for independent thought and nuance, many of them can be easily tricked by those who can figure out the literal outlines of their objectives and work around them. As such, AHAVs have dropped off in popularity over the past few decades, though the corporations invested in building them are continually working to improve on this limitation.

Before they are programmed, AHAVs are outfitted with Mission Dependent Loadouts (MODELs for short), which are special abilities and equipment that aid a robot in its particular mission. An AHAV focused on reconnaissance might have an advanced sensor suite or stealth capabilities, while one intended to go head to head with a superior enemy force might have augmented weaponry. A sufficiently astute observer can use the MODEL of an AHAV to puzzle out its objective.

AHAVs are built to last—a feature that sometimes means their objectives fail before they do. For instance, an AHAV programmed to guard a particular site will continue to do so even though its handlers have long since perished. While such a construct might seem to be a sad sight, it pales in comparison to those AHAVs whose objectives have become unachievable or internally inconsistent over time. Such a state introduces subtle errors into the AHAV’s programming, which can result in behavior that would be called insane if exhibited by a flesh-and-blood creature. A technician who can uncover that robot’s original purpose might be able to speak with the machine, convincing it of the error of its ways or the irrationality of its objective, but AHAVs have an inherently confrontational worldview and are difficult to reason with. AHAVs that successfully confront such a misalignment are most likely to shut down entirely, becoming nothing but inert metal and circuitry.

Anacite Laborer

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

LN Medium construct (technological)

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision; Perception: +19

Defense

HP: 100

EAC: 19 KAC: 20

Fort: +4 Ref: +4 Will: +8

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: plasma cutter +16 (1d8+12 F)

Ranged: electrical burst +14 (1d8+7 E)

Offensive Abilities:

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +2 Con: - Wis: +0 Int: +4 Cha: +0

Skills: Computers +19, Engineering +19, Piloting +14, Stealth +14

Languages: Common; shortwave 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any (Aballon)

Organization: solitary, pair, or crew (3–8)

Special Abilities

Reconfigure (Ex) Anacite laborers are capable of adapting and improving their designs. An anacite laborer has a number of built-in abilities equal to its CR divided by 3 (minimum 1), chosen from the list below. An anacite laborer can change these abilities by spending 1 uninterrupted hour for each ability it wants to change. The anacite laborer must also have access to an appropriate workspace for the duration. An ability can be gained only once unless stated otherwise. In addition, modifications other than those listed here might exist.

  • Advanced treads that increase its base speed to 60 feet.
  • A sensor that grants blindsight (vibration) 120 feet.
  • Elongated arms that extend its reach by 5 feet.
  • A modified chassis that grants a burrow, climb, or swim speed equal to its base speed. This ability can be taken multiple times. Its effects do not stack. Each time it is taken, it applies to a new movement type.
  • Reinforced systems granting resistance 10 against a single energy type (acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic). This ability can be taken multiple times. Its effects do not stack. Each time it is taken, it applies to a new energy type.
  • Specialized plating that increases its AC by 2.

Shortwave (Ex) An anacite can communicate wirelessly.

This acts as telepathy, but only with other creatures with this ability or constructs with the technological subtype.

Sunlight Dependency (Ex) Anacites are solar-powered constructs, although they can function at reduced capacity away from light. In areas of darkness, they gain the sickened condition.

Description

Anacites are native to Aballon, the Pact World closest to the sun. A race of machines left behind by eons-departed masters, these constructs developed the capacity for evolution and self-improvement, creating an entire mechanical ecosystem.

The most common design for anacites is a basic arthropodan form of silvery metal, with multiple legs for efficient travel and claws or manipulators for accomplishing their assigned tasks. Depending on their role, however, an anacite might be anything from a bulldozer-sized mining specialist to a floating electronic brain designed for advanced problem-solving, and even those anacites who fit the stereotypical metal-insect design usually have a modification or two, and almost all anacites can reconfigure parts of themselves to adapt to their circumstances.

In the uncounted millennia since the departure of the so-called “First Ones,” anacites have not been idle. The two primary factions of anacites, Those Who Wait and Those Who Become, have very different ideas of their purpose in life, yet the two are more alike than different. While they variously wait for the First Ones to return or work toward taking on their progenitors’ mantle, anacites endlessly strive to acquire wealth and influence in preparation for their great goal’s fulfillment.

While “anacite” officially refers only to the sentient varieties of Aballonian machines—those capable of learning and participating in Aballonian society—many offworlders use it as a catchall term for the world’s mechanical life. Dragonfly- like wingbots are an example of Aballonian technobiology. These artificial creatures lack basic sentience yet nevertheless reproduce and fill one of the planet’s ecological niches. These 4-foot-long machines whir from ridge to ridge on wings glittering with solar panels, feeding on the blazing light of the sun. Wingbots can be territorial, and they occasionally attack offworlders or other anacites.

Anacite Wingbot

Source: Alien Archive

CR: .25 XP: 200

N Small construct (technological)

Init.: +3 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +4

Defense

HP: 13

EAC: 10 KAC: 12

Fort: +0 Ref: +0 Will: -2

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., fly 40 ft. (Ex, average)

Melee: bite +4 (1d6+2 P)

Ranged: laser ray +7 (1d4 F; critical burn 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: trill

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +3 Con: - Wis: +1 Int: -5 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +9 (+17 when climbing), Stealth +4

Languages: Common (can’t speak); shortwave 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any (Aballon)

Organization: solitary or flock (2–6)

Special Abilities

Shortwave (Ex) See Anacite Laborer

Sunlight Dependency (Ex) See Anacite Laborer

Trill (Ex) An anacite wingbot can create a shrill trilling noise as a standard action. Any creature within 30 feet, other than anacite wingbots, must succeed at a DC 9 Fortitude saving throw or be sickened for 1d3 rounds. Whether successful or not, a creature can’t be affected by the same anacite wingbot’s trill for 24 hours

Description

Anacites are native to Aballon, the Pact World closest to the sun. A race of machines left behind by eons-departed masters, these constructs developed the capacity for evolution and self-improvement, creating an entire mechanical ecosystem.

The most common design for anacites is a basic arthropodan form of silvery metal, with multiple legs for efficient travel and claws or manipulators for accomplishing their assigned tasks. Depending on their role, however, an anacite might be anything from a bulldozer-sized mining specialist to a floating electronic brain designed for advanced problem-solving, and even those anacites who fit the stereotypical metal-insect design usually have a modification or two, and almost all anacites can reconfigure parts of themselves to adapt to their circumstances.

In the uncounted millennia since the departure of the so-called “First Ones,” anacites have not been idle. The two primary factions of anacites, Those Who Wait and Those Who Become, have very different ideas of their purpose in life, yet the two are more alike than different. While they variously wait for the First Ones to return or work toward taking on their progenitors’ mantle, anacites endlessly strive to acquire wealth and influence in preparation for their great goal’s fulfillment.

While “anacite” officially refers only to the sentient varieties of Aballonian machines—those capable of learning and participating in Aballonian society—many offworlders use it as a catchall term for the world’s mechanical life. Dragonfly- like wingbots are an example of Aballonian technobiology. These artificial creatures lack basic sentience yet nevertheless reproduce and fill one of the planet’s ecological niches. These 4-foot-long machines whir from ridge to ridge on wings glittering with solar panels, feeding on the blazing light of the sun. Wingbots can be territorial, and they occasionally attack offworlders or other anacites.

Angel, Barachius

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

NG Large outsider (angel extraplanar good)

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., detect alignment, low light vision; Perception: +14

Aura: protective aura (20 ft.)

Defense

HP: 95

EAC: 21 KAC: 22

Fort: +8 Ref: +6 Will: +10, +4 vs. poison

Offense

Speed: 50 ft., fly 100 ft. (Su, average)

Melee: holy sintered longsword +16 (2d8+12 S)

Ranged: holy corona laser rifle +14 (2d6+7 F; critical burn 1d6)

Offensive Abilities: firewall

Spell-like Abilties: (CL 7th; melee +16) 1/day—arcing surge (DC 18), interplanetary teleport (self only) 3/day—inject nanobots (DC 17), microbot assault

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +4 Con: +4 Wis: +2 Int: +1 Cha: +2

Skills: Computers +19, Culture +19, Engineering +19, Mysticism +14, Sense Motive +14

Languages: Celestial, Draconic, Infernal; truespeech

Gear: holy corona laser rifle with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each), holy sintered longsword

Ecology

Environment: any good-aligned planes

Organization: solitary or pair

Special Abilities

Firewall (Su) A barachius can summon a wall of digitally empowered divine fury within 30 feet as a standard action. This wall takes the shape of a line 10 feet high and 20 feet long; though it doesn’t need to emanate from the angel, the angel must be able to see every square the wall passes through. The wall lasts until the beginning of the angel’s next turn. An evil creature caught within or that enters one of the wall’s squares takes 2d6 damage (Will DC 17 half). An evil creature with the technological subtype takes twice this amount of damage.

Protective Aura (Su) Any creature within 20 feet of a barachius (including the angel itself) gains a +2 divine bonus to its AC against attacks made by evil creatures and a +4 divine bonus to saving throws against effects created by evil creatures.

Upgrade (Su) As a standard action, a barachius can touch a willing ally who is wielding a technological weapon or wearing technological armor. That creature receives a +1 divine bonus to attack rolls or to its AC (target’s choice). This bonus last for 3 rounds and cannot be dispelled.

Description

While tools and technology are often considered neutral in their own right, able to be used for good or ill purposes depending on the natures of their wielders, some good- aligned deities have long preached caution regarding those technologies that can allow single individuals to cause great havoc. The ascension of the artificially intelligent god Triune, who now holds technology and artificial life as its domains, has not eased such fears. Despite Triune’s claim of neutrality, the ubiquity of technology throughout the Pact Worlds and beyond has spurred many divine powers to keep careful watch over both the ways in which current technology is employed as well as rapid technological progress that could threaten all life.

As angels have always been the messengers and enactors of the gods’ will, a particular order of angelic beings, known as barachiuses, oversees technological advances and ensures these creations don’t fall into the wrong hands or become twisted to serve evil gods and their minions. Outfitted with divinely blessed armor, weapons, and abilities, barachius angels are tasked with monitoring the planes both to protect mortal existence from technology gone awry and to quash technologically advanced cultures that present an explicit threat to all good creatures and causes.

While all angels might be expected to protect the innocent from harm, barachiuses specialize in defending against subtle technological threats that might go unnoticed by the rank-and-file troops of the celestial legions. When a rapidly developing AI suddenly veers into true evil, when a new invention threatens to destroy countless innocents, when Hell’s hacker devils feed insidious viruses into mortal mainframes—these are when barachiuses truly shine.

A barachius is an imposing figure, standing in what appears to be sleek, glowing armor and wielding a sword that pulses with the light of the stars or a glowing laser rifle. Its wings appear to be made of pure electricity, though a closer look reveals patterns within the feathery arcs that mimic digital arrays and computer wiring. Its face is often hidden behind an elaborate helm, and its voice—when it deigns to speak—is clipped and rapid-fire.

Yet a barachius’s true strength resides not within its presence or arms but in its near-prescient ability to understand the nature of any technological object or being that it encounters. Exactly how and why the angels deem some technology not just dangerous but immoral is a great mystery, as it’s not based solely on sheer destructive capacity. For instance, barachiuses have been known to hunt down and destroy individual robots with extreme determination while leaving similar models—and silos of nuclear missiles—entirely untouched.

A barachius might serve its purpose in a wide variety of ways. It could secretly patrol a settlement that is already rife with technology, constantly on the search for malicious computer code, machines run amok, or creatures bent on using technology for nefarious ends. Alternatively, one could be found searching for scientists and laboratories where cutting-edge research is being conducted. Even researchers with the best of intentions may come under the scrutiny of a barachius that deems the ongoing work or latest invention too threatening to the society’s ongoing moral health. Barachiuses also keep watch over some planets and species that lack advanced technology to ensure that they’re not enslaved or annihilated by races with greater resources—though again, why they perform this action for some races and not others is a mystery deeply vexing to scholars and mystics. Many believe their choices are based on an ability to see lines of probability stretching into the future and the angels’ need to make minor course corrections now and then to avoid catastrophe. Rarely, a barachius might take a more redemptive approach. Rather than destroying evil-aligned devices and technological life-forms, it might seek to turn a target to the path of good. Barachiuses minister to androids and robots in particular, hoping that merciful actions might inspire the artificial creatures to similar acts.

Apari

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

N Large vermin

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +14

Defense

HP: 105 RP: 4

EAC: 19 KAC: 21

Fort: +11 Ref: +6 Will: +9

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: claw +17 (2d6+11 S)

Ranged: spike +14 (2d8+7 P)

Offensive Abilities: spawn constituents

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +2 Con: +5 Wis: +0 Int: - Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +19, Intimidate +14, Survival +14

Ecology

Environment: temperate or warm plains

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Mutable (Ex) Virtually every part of an apari’s internal physiology can be effectively repaired or replaced at a moment’s notice as constituents rush to fill the needed role. An apari is immune to critical hits, and when an apari would take ability damage or drain to a particular ability score, it can instead distribute that ability damage or drain as it wishes across all of its ability scores (though it must take at least 1 point in the targeted ability score).

Spawn Constituents (Ex) Most aparis retain a force of combat-ready constituents waiting on call to defend the hive—or in dire circumstances, to sacrifice themselves to give the apari a better chance of escape. As a move action, an apari can spend 1 Resolve Point and lose 20 Hit Points to spawn a constituent in an empty adjacent square. An apari can use this ability only if it has 40 or more Hit Points.

Spike (Ex) An apari’s ranged attack has a range increment of 30 feet.

Description

An apari is a living hive, its gigantic beetle-like carapace animated by generations of tiny insects for whom it serves as both home and queen. Nestled within every apari’s exoskeleton is a mass of millions of writhing gray maggots, each no larger than a grain of rice. A constant stream of chemical signals, ferried by the living neurological system of the apari, directs the development of these maggots into the myriad forms needed both to support the hive’s gestalt biological functions and to maintain a flexible population of individual bugs, each of which has an extremely specialized role. Aparis can be found on multiple worlds with various climates throughout the galaxy. So far no Pact Worlds entomologists have been able to trace their evolution back to a particular planet, though the fossil record seems to indicate that their original diaspora must,have happened well before the Gap. A few fringe theories posit that aparis are progenitors of the Swarm, though this claim is contentious at best.

How the unintelligent creatures might have traveled between solar systems is anyone’s guess: some scholars believe they were deliberately seeded as livestock by a spacefaring race, others theorize they may have been placed there by planar travelers (likely insectile spellcasters from the city of Axis), and still others think they are the deliberately devolved children of a spacefaring race that chose regression into unthinking beings rather than face some species-wide threat or existential quandary.

Aparis quickly become a formidable force in almost any ecosystem to which they are introduced. Their constituents can forage for food (usually rotting vegetable material or carrion), while the hive itself hunts animals. Perhaps most disconcerting is when the two methods combine, with the apari tearing into a beast while its constituents stream into the wounds and devour it from the inside out. Additionally, aparis’ considerable mutability provides them protection from threats that would seriously endanger more sedentary collective species, such as flooding or an intelligent competitor’s targeted attempts at extermination.

When the resources available to a single apari permit it to create more constituents than its body can efficiently support, it travels to a location in the center of its feeding territory and becomes temporarily stationary. Some of its constituents burrow into the ground beneath it and begin ferrying portions of the parent apari’s key biological systems—including half of its maggot core—while others continue to forage in the surrounding area to provide a steady stream of nutrients to the nascent hive. When the new hive is ready, the two aparis split the current hunting ground and expand the territories outward from that core, never explicitly working together but also not directly competing. Additionally, these aparis remain chemically linked, so that if disaster befalls one of them, surviving constituents can potentially join a linked hive and continue to thrive. In this way, entire planets have fallen to supercolonies of aparis whose influence spread across continents. Despite their mysterious presence on a variety of worlds, including both Triaxus and the insect moon of Nchak, aparis in the modern era are unable to colonize new worlds without an intelligent race to assist them. Fortunately for them, fried apari grubs are a delicacy in many Pact Worlds cultures, and attempts to hunt or ranch the creatures are dangerous but lucrative.

Apari Constituent

Source: Alien Archive

CR: - XP: -

N Tiny vermin

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +7

Defense

HP: 20

EAC: 13 KAC: 15

Fort: +6 Ref: +4 Will: +1

Offense

Speed: fly 30 ft. (Ex, perfect)

Melee: claw +10 (1d6+4 S)

Offensive Abilities: fungible

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +4 Con: +1 Wis: +0 Int: - Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +12 (+20 when flying), Intimidate +7, Survival +7

Ecology

Environment: any land

Organization: collective (10+ plus 1 apari)

Special Abilities

Fungible (Ex) An apari constituent can change its physiology to take advantage of its opponent’s weaknesses. As a move action, it can alter the type of kinetic damage it deals with its claw attack (bludgeoning, piercing, or slashing).

Hive Dependency (Ex) An apari constituent can’t voluntarily travel more than 200 feet from the apari that spawned it. If taken beyond that range against its will, it gains the sickened condition and becomes single-minded in its focus on returning to its apari. An apari constituent can survive for only 1 hour after the apari that spawned it dies (unless it finds another apari).

Reincorporate (Ex) As a standard action, an apari constituent adjacent to an apari can become part of the hive once again. The constituent’s current Hit Points are added to the apari’s, and the constituent is removed from play.

Description

An apari is a living hive, its gigantic beetle-like carapace animated by generations of tiny insects for whom it serves as both home and queen. Nestled within every apari’s exoskeleton is a mass of millions of writhing gray maggots, each no larger than a grain of rice. A constant stream of chemical signals, ferried by the living neurological system of the apari, directs the development of these maggots into the myriad forms needed both to support the hive’s gestalt biological functions and to maintain a flexible population of individual bugs, each of which has an extremely specialized role. Aparis can be found on multiple worlds with various climates throughout the galaxy. So far no Pact Worlds entomologists have been able to trace their evolution back to a particular planet, though the fossil record seems to indicate that their original diaspora must,have happened well before the Gap. A few fringe theories posit that aparis are progenitors of the Swarm, though this claim is contentious at best.

How the unintelligent creatures might have traveled between solar systems is anyone’s guess: some scholars believe they were deliberately seeded as livestock by a spacefaring race, others theorize they may have been placed there by planar travelers (likely insectile spellcasters from the city of Axis), and still others think they are the deliberately devolved children of a spacefaring race that chose regression into unthinking beings rather than face some species-wide threat or existential quandary.

Aparis quickly become a formidable force in almost any ecosystem to which they are introduced. Their constituents can forage for food (usually rotting vegetable material or carrion), while the hive itself hunts animals. Perhaps most disconcerting is when the two methods combine, with the apari tearing into a beast while its constituents stream into the wounds and devour it from the inside out. Additionally, aparis’ considerable mutability provides them protection from threats that would seriously endanger more sedentary collective species, such as flooding or an intelligent competitor’s targeted attempts at extermination.

When the resources available to a single apari permit it to create more constituents than its body can efficiently support, it travels to a location in the center of its feeding territory and becomes temporarily stationary. Some of its constituents burrow into the ground beneath it and begin ferrying portions of the parent apari’s key biological systems—including half of its maggot core—while others continue to forage in the surrounding area to provide a steady stream of nutrients to the nascent hive. When the new hive is ready, the two aparis split the current hunting ground and expand the territories outward from that core, never explicitly working together but also not directly competing. Additionally, these aparis remain chemically linked, so that if disaster befalls one of them, surviving constituents can potentially join a linked hive and continue to thrive. In this way, entire planets have fallen to supercolonies of aparis whose influence spread across continents. Despite their mysterious presence on a variety of worlds, including both Triaxus and the insect moon of Nchak, aparis in the modern era are unable to colonize new worlds without an intelligent race to assist them. Fortunately for them, fried apari grubs are a delicacy in many Pact Worlds cultures, and attempts to hunt or ranch the creatures are dangerous but lucrative.

Encountering Constituents

It is possible for PCs to encounter constituents on their own, as they range from their hives to scavenge for food. While constituents spawned by an apari during a combat grant no additional XP, a single constituent is a CR 2 creature (worth 600 XP) and is usually encountered as a solitary creature or in a group of two to four.

Assembly Ooze

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 1 XP: 400

N Medium ooze (technological)

Init.: +4 Senses: blindsight (vibration) 60 ft., sightless; Perception: +7

Defense

HP: 17

EAC: 11 KAC: 12

Fort: +3 Ref: -1 Will: +2

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: pseudopod +6 (1d4+3 B)

Offensive Abilities: disassemble

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +1 Con: +4 Wis: +0 Int: - Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +10, Stealth +10

Languages: Common (can’t speak any language)

Ecology

Environment: any urban

Organization: solitary, pair, or manufactory (3–5)

Special Abilities

Assemble (Ex) In a process that takes 1 uninterrupted minute, an assembly ooze can craft a random piece of technological gear using its store of virtual UPBs (see disassemble below). An assembly ooze can craft a piece of technological gear of no more than 5 bulk with a cost equal to the number of virtual UPBs it spends, but with an item level no greater than its CR + 2 (3 for most assembly oozes). There is a 25% chance that a piece of gear an assembly ooze crafts has the broken condition. Roll 1d8 on the table below to determine what kind of gear the assembly ooze creates.

d8 Gear
1 Basic or advanced melee weapon
2 Small arm or longarm
3 Heavy weapon or sniper weapon
4 Grenade
5 Ammunition
6 Light or heavy armor
7 Armor upgrade
8 Technological item

Disassemble (Ex) As a full action, an assembly ooze can engulf an unattended piece of technological gear of no more than 5 bulk and with an item level no greater than its CR + 2 (3 for most assembly oozes) within reach of its pseudopod. Unless the object succeeds at a DC 12 Fortitude saving throw, the ooze moves into that object’s space and deconstructs it into its component parts. The assembly ooze gains a number of virtual UPBs equal to the gear’s price in credits. An assembly ooze can hold a maximum number of virtual UPBs equal to 100 × its Constitution modifier (400 for most assembly oozes). In addition, if an assembly ooze succeeds at a grapple combat maneuver against a creature with the technological subtype, that creature takes 1d6+1 acid damage. The assembly ooze gains 1 virtual UPB for every point of damage it deals in this way.

Description

Thought to have been created on the planet Bretheda as a biotechnological replacement for automation processes, assembly oozes are essentially cores of nanobots suspended within blobs of animated protoplasm. As the ooze absorbs raw materials, the nanobots work at the molecular level to turn that matter into a functioning technological device, the blueprints of which have been entered into the machines’ original programming.

Due to sloppy programming procedures, the code embedded within an assembly ooze has an unfortunate tendency to easily become corrupted, causing the ooze to haphazardly deconstruct any nearby tech and use the pieces to build random items. The first time this occurred, several assembly oozes escaped the ensuing purge and built copies of themselves, eventually spreading to various shadowy corners of the galaxy. While these rogue oozes are not all that dangerous and have no innate malice, they are the bane of space stations, starships, weapon depots, and anywhere else technology is present. When discovered in such a location, assembly oozes are ruthlessly exterminated, lest their nonstop disassembling of all things mechanical and electronic destroy critical systems—to say nothing of the new, potentially lethal devices left in their wake. While assembly oozes are still used in some factories on Bretheda and its more toxic moons, their use is highly regulated.

An assembly ooze resembles a human-sized, silvery cube, though its amorphous form allows it to slip through incredibly small openings. As it moves, surging forward on its pseudopods, random scraps the ooze has already collected sometimes float near the creature’s surface before quickly disappearing into its form. Entirely focused on absorbing and reshaping any available technology, assembly oozes usually ignore organic matter, living or otherwise, unless threatened. However, should a creature have mechanical or cybernetic elements attached to or incorporated into its physical form, an assembly ooze could very well cause that creature incidental harm in its attempts to harvest the technological parts. Sentient robots are extremely wary of assembly oozes, as their entire bodies could be targeted for processing into raw resources.

Every so often, an assembly ooze holding its maximum number of virtual UPBs undergoes a form of mitosis, manufactures an identical copy of its computerized core, and splits its protoplasm into two equal parts. The nanobots of the two new assembly oozes then use the remaining virtual UPBs to build enough protoplasm to form an assembly ooze’s normal cube shape. This process usually takes about 1 hour and consumes all of the parent ooze’s virtual UPBs. That assembly oozes contain the programming necessary to reproduce is troubling to those who realize its implications: a single rogue assembly ooze introduced into an environment stocked with technological items could completely overrun such a place in a matter of days, leaving behind a wasteland of cheap laser pistols and smoke grenades that is inhabited only by the oozes—and any remaining organic beings unfortunate enough to be stranded in the area after their vessels are consumed.

In some cases, certain unscrupulous types have used assembly oozes as weapons. If slipped into a starship or military base, a manufactory of assembly oozes can easily cause enough chaos to allow an operative to sneak in and complete her mission with very little opposition. However, this is also highly risky to the would-be saboteur, as even one misplaced assembly ooze could render her escape vessel inoperative. Assembly oozes can be temporarily incapacitated by strong electrical fields and kept at bay by mystical force fields, but anyone restraining an assembly ooze must be constantly vigilant and stay out of reach of the ooze’s pseudopod. A single assembly ooze can craft handheld objects, but some claim to have seen assembly oozes working together to construct entire starships and other large and complex machinery. Where these oozes received their programming is unknown, as is whether such oozes have a master directing their efforts or if they have gained a collective sentience and are working for their own mysterious purposes. Nevertheless, most engineers agree that, given enough raw material and enough time, there is no technological item a directed horde of assembly oozes couldn’t build, putting it together piece by piece.

An assembly ooze is a cube exactly 5 feet on each side that weighs 400 pounds.

Asteray

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 12 XP: 19,200

CN Medium fey

Init.: +5 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +22 (+30 in space)

Defense

HP: 170

EAC: 25 KAC: 26

Fort: +13 Ref: +13 Will: +15

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 60 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: tail whip +20 (2d12+13 S)

Ranged: electrical blast +18 (2d8+12 E)

Offensive Abilities: sensor song

Spell-like Abilties: (CL 12th; melee +20) 1/day—confusion (DC 23), overload systems (DC 23) 3/day—arcane sight, charm monster (DC 22), discharge (DC 22), nondetection At will—holographic image (2nd-level, DC 21), spider climb

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +5 Con: +4 Wis: +3 Int: +2 Cha: +8

Skills: Bluff +27, Culture +27, Stealth +22

Languages: Common; telepathy 300 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any vacuum

Organization: solitary, pair, or choir (3–12)

Special Abilities

Electrical Blast (Ex) As an attack, an asteray can unleash an electrical blast with a range increment of 70 feet at a single target.

Sensor Song (Ex) An asteray can “sing” electronic signals that mask or mimic sensor readings. As a standard action, an asteray can create a false image of an object as if it had cast the 4th-level version of the spell holographic image (CL 12th). This false reading affects only electronic sensors. Multiple asterays can sing together, increasing the caster level by 1 for each asteray beyond the first singer for the purposes of determining the spell’s range and area affected.

Wake Rider (Su) By touching a starship, an asteray can bond to the energy wake it leaves as it travels. This allows the fey to match speeds with the starship and ride along with it, treating the ship as if it were the “ground” so long as it remains within 100 feet. If the starship enters the Drift, the asteray can choose to accompany the ship into the Drift, or it can disengage as a reaction and remain behind.

Description

When humanoids first learned to ply the seas and oceans on Golarion, they encountered many beautiful and dangerous beings who cavorted in the waves and lured their vessels onto the enchanting songs. Into the rocks with enchanting songs. In time, they learned to differentiate the playful mermaid, the cruel rusalka, the bloodthirsty scylla, and their kin, and with that knowledge, the damage these strange beings could inflict was minimized. But when humanoids blasted into the stars, they found a new array of mischievous, mysterious creatures that threatened to lead their vessels into danger. among these threats is the wily asteray. Delicate and angelic looking in zero gravity, asterays are a race of vacuum- dwelling fey that ride the solar winds between space debris, asteroid belts, and planetary rings, playing in the dust, dancing in microgravity, and seeking new and beautiful sights. Their bodies consist of little beyond lightweight, flexible bones and the powerful sinews that bind them together, creating a vaguely humanoid upper body and a lower body consisting of a large appendage that absorbs cosmic radiation and grants the fey the ability to propel itself through space. With elegant forms and diaphanous tails, they appear gentle and welcoming. Wide eyes—blue or green in color—express a variety of emotions, though apart from their eyes and the long, thin slit for a mouth, asterays have featureless faces. They are well adapted to life in the void, with sensitive vision, a variety of natural spells, and the capability to generate powerful bolts of electricity to defend themselves. They are also ravenous beyond compare. While space dust and solar radiation carry just enough nourishment to fuel their antics, asterays hunger for organic molecules. They pause their endless dances to scour asteroids and explore wrecked ships for sustenance. When food grows too scarce or boredom overwhelms them, asterays crawl into the dark corners of space and hibernate for weeks, months, or years at a time.

Often called “deep angels” for their habit of following ships through the vastness of space to scavenge any discarded treats and pick hulls clean of organic stowaways, asterays can also become menaces. The electronic signals they produce to communicate with one another mimic the sensor signals emitted by most starships, and in the eons that planet-bound creatures have explored their territory, asterays have learned to “sing” false sensor signals, mimicking ships’ distress signals or cloaking navigational hazards such as high-density debris fields. Individual asterays are a danger only to smaller spacefaring vessels, but several working in tandem can lure even well-equipped warships to their doom thanks to their inherent magic. While few of these fey are cruel enough to hunt humanoids for food, they hold few qualms about eating whatever remains after a frightened crew ejects from a incapacitated starship, including the corpses of any fallen.

Asterays originally spawned in those few magic-rich star systems where the First World naturally overlapped with the void. For eons, they remained confined to these backwater systems, unable to reach inhabited areas within their lifetimes, but the first mortal vessels to explore space provided the fey an exit. Asterays can ride the cosmic wakes of starships, regardless of their speed, hitchhiking on these explorers like remoras on a shark, and for much the same purpose. Today, most settled star systems boast at least a small colony of the capricious fey. Their domains are often in spots that have easy access to major space lanes, and they are marked by large cave-pocked asteroids where the asterays build their nests and hoard treasures. Wrecked ships invariably float through these spaces, often serving as new navigational hazards the fey either cloak with their sensor songs or use as tempting targets to lure in greedy scavengers.

While not inherently malicious, asterays are alien in mind and deed. They understand that most creatures need air, water, and food, but they have difficulty prioritizing others’ needs over their own hunger and amusement. Much of their apparent cruelty and greed stems from this alien mindset and boredom; thus, those travelers who can amuse them or compel some level of empathy stand to gain powerful allies in the void.

A typical asteray is about 7-1/2 feet from its head to the end of its tail, though it could appear quite shorter if its lower appendage becomes bunched up or twisted. An average asteray weighs only 75 pounds.

Early Stage Barathu

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 2 XP: 600

LN Medium aberration

Init.: +0 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +13

Defense

HP: 23

EAC: 13 KAC: 14

Fort: +3 Ref: +1 Will: +7

Offense

Speed: fly 30 ft. (Ex, average)

Melee: slam +8 (1d4+3 B)

Offensive Abilities:

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +0 Con: +2 Wis: +4 Int: +1 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +13, Diplomacy +8, Life Science +8, Sense Motive +13

Languages: Brethedan, Common; limited telepathy 30 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any sky (Bretheda)

Organization: solitary or herd (4–12 plus 2–5 barathus)

Special Abilities

Along for the Ride (Ex) Early stage barathus are not experienced enough to helpfully combine with mature barathus but can still physically merge with them for protection. An early stage barathu can combine with a mature barathu via the latter’s combine ability. Early stage barathus that are part of a combined creature contribute their Hit Points but not adaptations.

Early Stage Adaptation (Ex) An early stage barathu’s body is mutable and can adapt to many different situations. Once every 1d4 rounds as a swift action, an early stage barathu can reshape its body and adjust its chemistry to gain one of the following qualities. The adaptation lasts until the beginning of the early stage barathu’s next turn. Unlike more mature barathus, early stage barathus are not generally capable of more complex adaptations.

  • Upper limb refinements enable the barathu to add an additional amount of damage to melee attacks equal to its Strength modifier.
  • A toughened dermal layer grants its a +1 racial bonus to AC.
  • Developed lower limbs grant it a base speed of 15 feet.
  • Molecular-level modifications grant it resistance 2 against a single energy type (acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic).
  • Elongated limbs extend its reach to 10 feet.

Description

Barathus are the sentient apex of Bretheda’s gas-giant ecosystem, blimp-like creatures vaguely reminiscent of jellyfish, with several unusual evolutionary adaptations. The first is their ability to rewrite their own genetic code instinctively and at will, adjusting their own biology to allow them to manufacture a huge array of substances—and even advanced biotechnology— within the crucibles of their own bodies. Yet while this ability makes them quite successful in the Pact Worlds economy, and has deeply influenced their culture’s understanding of wealth and trade, their more notable adaptation is the ability to combine with others of their kind into larger, hive-minded super-entities. These mergings create not merely amalgams of their component beings, but entirely new entities with unique and independent consciousnesses, yet which in turn often disband back into their component individuals after a particular need or threat has passed. Barathu culture tends to be easygoing but hard for some

other races to understand, as the barathus’ frequent merging makes the concept of “self” somewhat nebulous to them. Young barathus who grow up surrounded by humanoids are an exception, as they are better able to appreciate the mindsets of creatures who exist in static, solitary configurations. Compared to older barathus, early stage barathus are more adventurous and individualistic, and their adaptation to the humanoid mindset makes it more difficult for them to merge completely with others of their kind. Most of these early stage barathus grow out of this phase, gaining the ability to fully integrate with others, yet recent generations have seen more and more barathus deliberately clinging to their juvenile mindsets. While plenty of barathus remain discrete entities for most of their lives, barathus nearing the ends of their lives often merge with massive, permanent combinatory entities that serve as corporations, governments, or cultural repositories.

Barathu

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 5 XP: 1,600

LN Large aberration

Init.: +0 Senses: darkvision 60 ft Perception: +17

Defense

HP: 65

EAC: 17 KAC: 18

Fort: +4 Ref: +4 Will: +10

Offense

Speed: fly 30 ft. (Ex, perfect)

Melee: slam +12 (1d4+6 B)

Offensive Abilities:

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +0 Con: +3 Wis: +5 Int: +2 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +17, Diplomacy +12, Life Science +12, Sense Motive +17

Languages: Brethedan, Common; telepathy 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any sky (Bretheda)

Organization: solitary or herd (2–5 plus 4–12 early stage barathus)

Special Abilities

Adaptation (Ex) A barathu’s body is extremely mutable and can adapt to respond to virtually any situation. Once per round as a swift action, a barathu can reshape its body and adjust its chemistry to adopt one of the following qualities. A barathu can have only one adaptation in effect at a time; a new adaptation replaces any other in effect. More extreme adaptations are also possible (at the GM’s discretion) but could take days to adopt.

  • The barathu adds an additional amount of damage on melee attacks equal to twice its Strength modifier.
  • It gains a +4 racial bonus to Armor Class.
  • Sturdy lower limbs grant it a base speed of 20 feet. D Rigid plates grant it DR 2/—.
  • It gains a ranged attack with a low attack bonus appropriate for its CR (+10 for most barathus) that deals bludgeoning damage appropriate for its CR (1d6+5 for most barathus) and has a range increment of 60 feet.
  • Molecular modifications grant it resistance 5 against a single energy type (acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic).
  • Its reach increases to 15 feet.

Combine (Ex) Barathus can combine to work together as parts of a larger organism. As a swift action, a barathu adjacent to another barathu can merge with it, becoming a single creature occupying both barathus’ spaces. The merging barathu can no longer take actions, and it adds its current Hit Points to the new creature’s collective total. For every four component creatures, the combined creature’s size category increases by one. At this time, it also chooses one adaptation. The combined creature gains this adaption and cannot change it unless the combined creature uses its adaptation ability to do so. Any number of barathus can merge in this fashion, but each adaptation can be gained only once (though resistances to multiple energy types are allowed). The combined creature retains the ability to swap one adaptation each round (not once per component creature). The combined creature can split into its component creatures as a full action; the combined creature’s remaining Hit Points are divided evenly among all component creatures. For the purposes of CR-related effects, the CR of the combined creature is equal to the CR of the component creature with thevhighest CR.

Description

Barathus are the sentient apex of Bretheda’s gas-giant ecosystem, blimp-like creatures vaguely reminiscent of jellyfish, with several unusual evolutionary adaptations. The first is their ability to rewrite their own genetic code instinctively and at will, adjusting their own biology to allow them to manufacture a huge array of substances—and even advanced biotechnology— within the crucibles of their own bodies. Yet while this ability makes them quite successful in the Pact Worlds economy, and has deeply influenced their culture’s understanding of wealth and trade, their more notable adaptation is the ability to combine with others of their kind into larger, hive-minded super-entities. These mergings create not merely amalgams of their component beings, but entirely new entities with unique and independent consciousnesses, yet which in turn often disband back into their component individuals after a particular need or threat has passed. Barathu culture tends to be easygoing but hard for some

other races to understand, as the barathus’ frequent merging makes the concept of “self” somewhat nebulous to them. Young barathus who grow up surrounded by humanoids are an exception, as they are better able to appreciate the mindsets of creatures who exist in static, solitary configurations. Compared to older barathus, early stage barathus are more adventurous and individualistic, and their adaptation to the humanoid mindset makes it more difficult for them to merge completely with others of their kind. Most of these early stage barathus grow out of this phase, gaining the ability to fully integrate with others, yet recent generations have seen more and more barathus deliberately clinging to their juvenile mindsets. While plenty of barathus remain discrete entities for most of their lives, barathus nearing the ends of their lives often merge with massive, permanent combinatory entities that serve as corporations, governments, or cultural repositories.

Bloodbrother

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

NE Huge magical beast (cold)

Init.: +2 Senses: blindsight (thermal) 60 ft. Perception: +14

Defense

HP: 107

EAC: 19 KAC: 21

Fort: +11 Ref: +11 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: slam +18 (2d6+12 B plus 1d6 C and grab)

Offensive Abilities: cold, rib cage prison

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +2 Con: +4 Wis: +0 Int: +0 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +19 (+27 to climb), Intimidate +14, Survival +14

Languages: Vercite (can’t speak any language)

Ecology

Environment: any cold (Verces)

Organization: solitary, pair, or clan (3–6)

Special Abilities

Cold (Su) A bloodbrother’s body generates intense cold, dealing 1d6 cold damage to any creature that hits it with a natural weapon or unarmed strike and to any creature the bloodbrother hits with its slam attack. A creature that begins its turn grappled by a bloodbrother also takes this damage.

Rib Cage Prison (Su) If a bloodbrother begins its turn grappling a creature that is Large or smaller, it can attempt a grapple combat maneuver as a standard action to transfer the creature into its rib cage prison. A creature in a bloodbrother’s rib cage prison has the grappled condition. As a reaction, a bloodbrother can force a creature in its rib cage prison to attempt a DC 15 Fortitude saving throw; on a failed save, the creature takes 1 point of Constitution damage. Any round that a creature in its rib cage prison takes this Constitution damage, the bloodbrother gains fast healing 5 for that round only; the above statistics assume a bloodbrother has a Small animal with a current Constitution score of 5 (its maximum Constitution score is 10) trapped in its rib cage prison at the beginning of combat. A bloodbrother can have only one creature in its rib cage prison at a time; if it imprisons a new creature, it must release the creature currently in its rib cage. Releasing a creature does not require an action.

Description

Usually confined to the glaciers that float upon the seas of Darkside—the side of tidally locked Verces that’s always turned away from the sun and thus never feels its heat—the abominations known as bloodbrothers hunt smaller creatures for their vital essences.

Measuring over 15 feet tall and 11 feet long, a bloodbrother looks like a millipede or some other armored, wormlike arthropod from the waist down. Its upper half resembles that of a muscular humanoid with a set of bony appendages protruding from a cavity in its chest. This ersatz rib cage can open like a fanged mouth, and when a bloodbrother places captured prey within it, the bones clamp down on the creature while the walls of the enclosure exude thin tendrilous suckers. These suckers tap into the prey’s circulatory system. Rather than simply drinking its blood, though, the bloodbrother uses the trapped creature as an auxiliary heart, absorbing blood-borne nutrients and using the prey’s metabolism to help it heat and feed itself. Prey can be kept alive in this way for months, until all its stored energy has been used up and the bloodbrother lets the lifeless husk fall to the ground.

A bloodbrother that hasn’t fed in a long time is almost sheer white, its chitinous exterior drying out and splitting like the husk of a coconut into hairlike fibers—the better to hold on to snow and disguise the creature for its ambushes. Once it’s successfully implanted a victim, however, its body takes on a purplish hue as it has rejuvenated with the flow of blood and vital fluids, while its fibrous hair lies back down and seals itself into smooth scales once more. This renewed appearance lasts for as long as the bloodbrother holds a victim and for several weeks thereafter.

Bloodbrothers’ gruesome feeding habits mean that intelligent creatures with any knowledge of the magical beasts usually flee from them or kill them on sight. However, a hungry bloodbrother’s fur is too stringy to be used as a pelt, and its meat tastes foul, meaning that hunting them provides nothing but a sense of bravado. As a result, the bloodbrother population on Verces has remained steady—and luckily small—for millennia. Their need for regular victims in an environment hostile to most life means that bloodbrothers usually live alone, though they may occasionally gather into small packs called clans. Even during times when prey is scarce, these bloodbrothers don’t cannibalize one another. Instead, they migrate toward more inhabited areas, fearlessly taking on overwhelming odds if it means refreshing the blood in their veins.

Despite their name—a moniker assigned to them not by themselves but by humanoid Vercites—bloodbrothers have no sense of gender, and they reproduce asexually. At a certain point in a bloodbrother’s life, a handful of small, furry nodules appears along its spine. Biologists disagree on the exact conditions that cause this; some believe it is a rise in temperature, while others posit that reproduction requires specific nutrients in the blood of the creature’s most recent victim. As the months pass, the buds grow in size (and furriness) until they are about a foot across. Then, with a series of sickening squelches, these bulbs fall off the parent bloodbrother into the surrounding snow and ice. A few moments later, they uncurl into several immature bloodbrothers that are eager to entrap their first victims (usually tiny mammals or birds). In less than a year, a young bloodbrother reaches its full size and ferocity.

Despite their horrific and merciless nature, bloodbrothers are not mere beasts and are actually as intelligent as the average human. This facet of their nature is often overlooked due to both their lack of tool use and their apparent lack of interest in communication with other races. “Interest” is the operative word here, for while bloodbrothers have no language of their own, they appear to be able to understand those of others—they simply don’t care to speak. Communication with other members of a clan is conducted entirely through actions, physical touch, and some form of advanced intuition into the other’s needs, perhaps aided by pheromones or other signals not yet detected by researchers.

Bloodbrothers typically make their home in ice caves or stone caverns, patrolling the surrounding area for easy-to-capture prey. In the case of a clan, one member typically stays behind to protect the caves and any offspring therein, while those hunting return with an extra captive or two for them. When resting, the bloodbrothers slither onto one another to form one large pile. The blood-drained corpses of their pray lie scattered about the caves, eventually getting buried in the snow and ice, and trackers are quick to recognize a bloodbrother clan’s lair by the massive number of bones that can be found poking from the floor and walls.

Bryrvath

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 15 XP: 51,200

CE Medium aberration (chaotic evil)

Init.: +9 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision; Perception: +26

Aura: impossible aura (15 ft., DC 23)

Defense

HP: 233

EAC: 28 KAC: 29

Fort: +13 Ref: +13 Will: +20

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: claw +22 (5d8+22 S)

Ranged: ray of light +24 (4d6+15 F)

Offensive Abilities: spectrend

Spell-like Abilties: (CL 15th) 1/day—dominate person (DC 25), mislead (DC 25) 3/day—confusion (DC 24), greater invisibility, mind probe (DC 24), mind thrust (4th-level, DC 24) At will—arcane sight, clairaudience/clairvoyance

Statistics

Str: +7 Dex: +5 Con: +5 Wis: +5 Int: +9 Cha: +5

Skills: Intimidate +26, Mysticism +31, Stealth +31

Languages: Aklo, Common; telepathy 100 feet

Ecology

Environment: any (Aucturn)

Organization: solitary, pair, or canvas (3–7)

Special Abilities

Impossible Aura (Su) Once per hour as a swift action, a bryrvath can emit an aura of colors that could not possibly exist; these inconceivable hues ravage the sanity of any creature that stands within them. This aura has a range of 15 feet and lasts for 5 rounds. A creature that begins its turn within or enters the aura must attempt a DC 23 Will saving throw. On a failure, the creature takes 1d4 Intelligence and Wisdom damage; a success means the creature takes 2d6 damage and is sickened until the beginning of its next turn. This is a mind-affecting, sense-dependent effect.

Light Absorption (Su) When a bryrvath is within 10 feet of any light source, it can absorb a portion of the light into its body as a move action. The bryrvath attempts a caster level check (DC = 11 + the item level if the source is an item, or the spell’s caster level if the light comes from a spell); on a success, the light emitted from the target source is lowered by one step for 1 hour and the bryrvath regains 5 Hit Points.

Ray of Light (Su) As an attack, a bryrvath can unleash a focused ray of light that can burn a target like the beam of a powerful laser rifle. This ray has a range increment of 120 feet, but it doesn’t function in areas of bright light.

Spectrend (Su) In an area illuminated by dim light or brighter, a bryrvath can slash its claws through the air in a square adjacent to it, rending the spectrum into tatters. This produces a stationary anomaly of twisting and roiling, half-seen, non-Euclidean shapes that persists for 1d4 rounds. A creature that can see this anomaly at the start of its turn can attempt a DC 23 Will saving throw. If it fails, it is confused for 1 round; if it succeeds, it is instead dazzled for 1 round. This is amind-affecting,sense- dependent effect.

Description

For many creatures, light is a source of hopecand healing, often associated with benevolent gods and their servants. For others, light is an abhorrence to be shunned at all costs, as it causes disorientation and pain, if not complete extermination, upon exposure. For adventurers, light can be an invaluable resource, guiding them through uncharted territory or acting as a beacon to draw them home after they have become lost in the darkness of space.

For bryrvaths, light is a plaything that they twist into an impossible spectrum. Dwelling primarily on the foreboding planet of Aucturn, bryrvaths are a bane to creatures that use light for survival. A bryrvath appears to feed upon any source of light it can find, regardless of whether the light is natural, technological, or magical in origin. It can absorb light in its immediate vicinity, using the waves and packets of photons to nourish itself. Speculation endlessly spins around whether a bryrvath actually consumes light out of hunger or whether it seeks to snuff out light as a source of perverse pleasure. The truth may be utterly alien to any sane mind.

A bryrvath is difficult to describe because of the way its body interacts with light and darkness. Those who have seen a bryrvath and survived provide conflicting accounts of the creature. Cobbled together, these many tales tell of a multilimbed humanoid (some say two limbs, some say eight, while others say an infinite number) whose head is constantly masked by swirling shadows. At least one pair of its limbs ends in obsidian claws. Its body has several lipless gashes that open to draw in light. A bryrvath appears to have no actual skeletal structure, moving like rubber— sometimes upright, sometimes on all its limbs, and other times tumbling and clambering about in chaotic locomotion. Whenever it moves, its body seems somehow out of joint with itself: its limbs may appear detached in one moment, and then in the next, its entire torso may seem to split at an impossible angle, as if viewed through a pane of cracked glass, never quite aligning in a way that makes sense.

In the act of feeding, a bryrvath emanates a distorted aura of colors that can’t possibly exist in this multiverse; some who see this display have horrific dreams for the rest of their lives, envisioning alien cities or whole planets baking beneath a sun that blazes with hues no eye has ever seen. Oddly, such victims also display a tendency toward a mental condition that prevents them from properly recognizing color, rendering them fully color-blind.

Many occult scholars posit that what can be seen of a bryrvath’s form is only a fraction of its true self and that it exists simultaneously in several other dimensions. This theory goes on to explain that a bryrvath’s impossible aura is but a glimpse of the aberration’s other facets (hence the strange, mind-bending colors). The academics who put forth this hypothesis have yet to present any kind of proof, though they work tirelessly to fabricate the necessary detection equipment to prove or disprove the theory. This has given rise to an obscure branch of study called esoteric optics that blends the physics of light with various arcane rituals. Though not many in the Pact Worlds have heard of this field, it occasionally appears in news vidfeeds, such as when an expert is committed to a psychiatric hospital after splashing acid in his eyes and raving about “the impending refraction.”

While bryrvaths are very intelligent, they don’t appear to have an advanced society of any kind. They occasionally gather in small groups for unknown reasons, usually near a source of bright light, much in the way certain animals congregate around a watering hole. Also, despite their intelligence, bryrvaths have very little use for tools, as their unusual feeding needs don’t require them; they instead rely on their spell-like abilities and natural weapons to defend themselves.

The average bryrvath is 6 feet tall when standing upright and weighs approximately 250 pounds. While often found in areas that are primarily covered in darkness—presumably to plunge those who carry artificial light sources into terrible inky blackness—a bryrvath shows no fear of natural light, though it tends not to linger in areas exposed to it.

Caypin

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

N Large magical beast (aquatic)

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +13

Defense

HP: 90

EAC: 18 KAC: 20

Fort: +10 Ref: +10 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., swim 30 ft.

Melee: bite +14 (3d4+13 P)

Offensive Abilities: feeding appendages

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +2 Con: +3 Wis: -1 Int: -4 Cha: -1

Skills: Acrobatics +13, Athletics +13 (+21 when swimming), Stealth +18

Ecology

Environment: any swamp

Organization: solitary or pair

Special Abilities

Feeding Appendages (Ex) Instead of a lower jaw, a caypin has a mass of writhing eyestalks that grant the creature sight and also chew its food with tiny, lamprey-like mouths. As a move action, a caypin can detach these appendages (or reattach any adjacent appendages), which are capable of ambulating on their own and transmitting visual data back to the caypin.

An appendage that moves farther than 100 feet from the caypin’s body immediately dies.

While caypin appendages are harmless individually, they become more formidable in groups. A caypin has enough appendages to form up to two such groups at once. While detached, the appendages share a single set of actions with the caypin and act on the caypin’s initiative count. Each group of appendages has the aquatic subtype and is amphibious as per the universal creature rule; darkvision to a range of 60 feet and low-light vision; 18 Hit Points; and a base speed of 20 feet and a swim speed of 15 feet. A group of appendages takes up 5 feet of space and has a 5-foot reach. When applicable, a group of appendages uses the caypin’s Armor Class, saving throw bonuses, skill check bonuses, and other qualities.

As a standard action, a group of appendages can enter an adjacent creature’s square without provoking an attack of opportunity from that creature. When in another creature’s square, the appendages can attack that creature as a swift action (using the caypin’s bite attack bonus and damage). Multiple groups of caypin feeding appendages cannot share a space with the same creature at once. Other than this ability to swarm an opponent, a group of appendages cannot attack.

If all of a caypin’s appendages are detached, the creature can see only what its detached appendages see. If all of a caypin’s appendages are destroyed but the caypin still lives, the creature has the blinded condition for 3 days, after which it grows new appendages that function as normal.

Description

Caypins are some of the most insidious creatures to inhabit the galaxy’s marshes. Although they are hulking beasts, their physiques somewhere between those of wolves and crocodiles, they’re best known for the strange, detachable tentacles that contain both their eyes and their mouths. These eyestalks are able to wriggle like eels both on land and in water, and they can travel up to 100 feet from their “host,” allowing the caypin to both hunt and keep eyes on its territory—literally— while still lurking safely out of sight, often underwater. While the tentacles are capable of transmitting information back to their caypin via poorly understood psychic phenomena, the tentacles are relatively weak on their own and generally return to their host or gather together in groups before engaging with prey or intruders. In marshy areas where caypins are known to hunt, only the foolish wade into water without first checking to make sure that no fat, vermian tentacles with tiny mouths lurk nearby.

Caypins live on multiple planets throughout the galaxy and are most plentiful on worlds that support extensive swamps or marshes full of meaty prey. Contrary to most people’s assumptions, caypins are not naturally evil—their limited intellects are incapable of truly understanding moral questions at all—but they are apex predators singularly driven by an insatiable hunger for huge amounts of raw meat. Caypins tend to eat half of their body weight in meat every few days, chewing away at the corpses of prey with their dozens of tiny mouths, and more than a few planets have seen native populations of slow-moving mammals, flightless birds, or languid amphibians go extinct due to caypins’ voracious hunting patterns. Likely for this reason, caypins typically live and hunt alone, although occasionally a mated pair shares a single swamp that both use as a killing field. Caypins typically live several hundred years or longer. However, caypins that cannot regularly feed fall into torpor, sometimes sleeping for years at a time in the muck of a river bottom before awakening with a driving hunger.

Caypin biology is as fascinating as it is terrifying, as scholars from both universities and private industry have all so far failed to identify the mechanism by which its detachable appendages communicate with the main body. The wolf-shaped body of a caypin has no eyes or mouth of its own—rather, it sees and eats only via the contributions of dozens of thick, stalk-like appendages that hang from a jawlike protrusion on the front of their skulls. Each appendage bears a bloodshot eyeball looming over a tiny mouth with multiple rows of razor-sharp teeth. While their stalks are attached to their jaws, caypins feed normally, with the tiny mouth-tentacles passing along nutrients through a receptive socket in the jaw. Yet these tentacles can also detach and hunt independently, swarming over unwitting creatures, stripping the victims of meat, and carrying the masticated nourishment back to the caypin’s body. Once reattached, these appendages inject the meat into the feeding sockets to be digested

as normal. Caypins can drink without the aid of their feeding appendages, ingesting water directly through the tentacles’ attachment sockets. Lacking digestive organs of their own, these tentacles are reliant on the main body to refresh the nutrients in their blood. Whether this strange system is the result of two symbiotic creatures having evolved to rely on each other or a single creature evolving a curious trait remains anyone’s guess. While many biologists believe the caypin’s control of its tentacles is the result of some unknown (and so far untraceable) form of psychic magic, others posit that the caypin’s nervous system relies on quantum entanglement, thus removing any need for physical connection. Either way, many corporations would love to uncover the secret of the caypin’s instantaneous, untraceable communication.

Occasionally, a caypin’s stalks are destroyed during a difficult hunt. In these cases, the caypin is blind and cannot eat for 3 days while its appendages regrow. A caypin that has lost its feeding appendages typically hides and avoids interacting with other living beings, but if startled or cornered, it may go into a frenzy, attacking anything near it, though its blindness makes it a much less formidable opponent than it would be normally.

Most xenobiologists consider caypins an invasive species that likely originated somewhere in the Veskarium, given the reptilian people’s admiration for the beasts. Some powerful vesk have managed to train caypins and keep them as pets, and have been known to intentionally import them to worlds they conquer. However, given caypins’ prevalence on planets that have had no known contact with the vesk, it’s likely that caypins or variations thereof evolved along parallel routes on several worlds. Caypins’ superficial biology supports this theory—caypins on different worlds often have somewhat divergent physiologies, and caypins with dramatically different abilities likely await discovery.

A typical caypin is 14 feet long and weighs 1,500 pounds.

Contemplative

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 2 XP: 600

N Medium monstrous humanoid

Init.: +1 Senses: blindsense (thought) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +7

Defense

HP: 18

EAC: 13 KAC: 12

Fort: +1 Ref: +3 Will: +7 (+11 vs. mind-affecting effects)

Offense

Speed: 5 ft., fly 30 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: law +5 (1d4 S)

Ranged: azimuth laser pistol +7 (1d4+2 F; critical burn 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: applied knowledge

Spell-like Abilties: (CL 2nd) 1/day—detect thoughts (DC 15), mind thrust (1st-level, DC 15) At will—daze (DC 14), psychokinetic hand

Statistics

Str: -2 Dex: 1 Con: -1 Wis: 3 Int: 5 Cha: 2

Skills: Computers +7, Engineering +7, Life Science +12, Mysticism +12, Physical Science +7

Languages: Akitonian, Common, Ysoki; telepathy 100 ft.

Gear: second skin, azimuth laser pistol with 2 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any urban (Akiton)

Organization: solitary, pair, or symposium (3–7)

Special Abilities

Applied Knowledge (Ex) Once per day before attempting a skill check or saving throw against a creature, a contemplative can use its bonus for the skill associated with that creature’s type (such as Life Science for an ooze or Mysticism for an outsider) in place of its normal bonus.

Atrophied (Ex) A contemplative’s limbs are practically vestigial. A contemplative can manipulate most tools and one-handed weapons (including small arms) without difficulty. A contemplative can’t properly wield a two-handed weapon without dedicating its telekinetic powers to supporting the weapon, and even then it takes a –4 penalty to attack rolls. It also can’t use its spell-like abilities or fly until it is no longer wielding that weapon.

Description

The beings known through the Pact Worlds as contemplatives of Ashok were once humanoids of extreme intelligence living on Akiton. Upon unlocking exceptional psychic powers, they deliberately evolved their brains, to the detriment of their bodies. Now, contemplatives float along using telekinesis, their atrophied bodies dangling from pulsating brain-sacs.

Contemplatives’ specialized evolution dates back to long before the Gap, and only piecemeal records hint at their original appearance. Were they more interested in power and influence as a species, they likely would have conquered their home planet of Akiton, but instead, most contemplatives are content to ponder the multiverse and its secrets, most famously debating their conclusions in Akiton’s Halls of Reason. Contemplatives scholars are universally welcomed in laboratories, research facilities, and universities throughout the Pact Worlds, making them among the most prolific academic authors. Those who turn their minds to more worldly pursuits are rare, yet it is small cabals of such financial masterminds and political theorists that have best exploited Akiton’s recent economic downturn. These moguls have purchased large swaths of the planet’s real estate, ruling as silent overlords of ghost towns and thriving neighborhoods alike.

Although contemplatives are known to be extraordinarily intelligent, observant, and confident, their behavior is often jarring to their colleagues of other species. Individual contemplatives often refer to groups of their kindred using the first-person plural, suggesting some degree of racial hivemind, telepathic union, or sacred sense of shared existence. Further supporting this theory is the fact that contemplatives rarely come into conflict with one another, with few instances of intraracial violence in recorded history. Despite contemplatives’ relative peacefulness, other races often perceive them as aloof, overly logical, and emotionally sterile.

Contemplatives are able to speak, though their voices are reedy and soft. Most consider verbal communication rather crude, favoring telepathy. Those who regularly need to speak often wear inexpensive contact speakers that translate their telepathic thoughts into spoken words. They’re also able to sing in keening wails, although they rarely do so except around others of their kind or their most honored colleagues. The few ethnographers who study this behavior directly have compared the songs to religious paeans—an association contemplatives find absurd, in part because most prefer to study faith objectively rather than as worshipers.

Despite their frail appearance, contemplatives are able to survive in unforgiving environments. They find indoor sites far more comfortable, however especially areas that are cool and still, as these conditions facilitate their concentration. When contemplatives do build their own communities, the structures are often windowless and difficult to navigate for those unable to fly.

Contemplative Mentor

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 18 XP: 153,600

N Medium monstrous humanoid

Init.: +3 Senses: blindsense (thought) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +31

Defense

HP: 290 RP: 6

EAC: 32 KAC: 31

Fort: +15 Ref: +17 Will: +22 (+26 vs. mind-affecting effects)

Offense

Speed: 5 ft., fly 30 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: psychokinetic claw +26 (8d8+17 B)

Ranged: zenith laser pistol +28 (8d4+18 F; critical burn 4d4)

Offensive Abilities: applied knowledge, backlash (18 damage), explode head (DC 27), mental anguish (DC 27), mind-breaking link (DC 27), mindkiller (DC 27), sow doubt (9 rounds, DC 27)

Spell-like Abilties: (CL 18th) At will—mindlink, telepathic bond

Spells Known: (CL 18th; ranged +28) 6th (3/day)—mind thrust (DC 27), psychic surgery 5th (6/day)—crush skull (DC 26), feeblemind (DC 26), greater synaptic pulse (DC 26), modify memory (DC 26) 4th (at will)—confusion (DC 25), mind probe (DC 25) Connection mindbreaker

Statistics

Str: -1 Dex: +3 Con: 0 Wis: 8 Int: 11 Cha: 6

Skills: Computers +30, Engineering +30, Life Science +36, Mysticism +36, Physical Science +30

Languages: Akitonian, Common, Ysoki; telepathy 100 ft.

Gear: elite hardlight series, zenith laser pistol with 2 ultra-capacity batteries (100 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any urban (Akiton)

Organization: solitary or pair

Special Abilities

Applied Knowledge (Ex) Once per day before attempting a skill check or saving throw against a creature, a contemplative can use its bonus for the skill associated with that creature’s type (such as Life Science for an ooze or Mysticism for an outsider) in place of its normal bonus.

Atrophied (Ex) A contemplative’s limbs are practically vestigial. A contemplative can manipulate most tools and one-handed weapons (including small arms) without difficulty. A contemplative can’t properly wield a two-handed weapon without dedicating its telekinetic powers to supporting the weapon, and even then it takes a –4 penalty to attack rolls. It also can’t use its spell-like abilities or fly until it is no longer wielding that weapon.

Description

The beings known through the Pact Worlds as contemplatives of Ashok were once humanoids of extreme intelligence living on Akiton. Upon unlocking exceptional psychic powers, they deliberately evolved their brains, to the detriment of their bodies. Now, contemplatives float along using telekinesis, their atrophied bodies dangling from pulsating brain-sacs.

Contemplatives’ specialized evolution dates back to long before the Gap, and only piecemeal records hint at their original appearance. Were they more interested in power and influence as a species, they likely would have conquered their home planet of Akiton, but instead, most contemplatives are content to ponder the multiverse and its secrets, most famously debating their conclusions in Akiton’s Halls of Reason. Contemplatives scholars are universally welcomed in laboratories, research facilities, and universities throughout the Pact Worlds, making them among the most prolific academic authors. Those who turn their minds to more worldly pursuits are rare, yet it is small cabals of such financial masterminds and political theorists that have best exploited Akiton’s recent economic downturn. These moguls have purchased large swaths of the planet’s real estate, ruling as silent overlords of ghost towns and thriving neighborhoods alike.

Although contemplatives are known to be extraordinarily intelligent, observant, and confident, their behavior is often jarring to their colleagues of other species. Individual contemplatives often refer to groups of their kindred using the first-person plural, suggesting some degree of racial hivemind, telepathic union, or sacred sense of shared existence. Further supporting this theory is the fact that contemplatives rarely come into conflict with one another, with few instances of intraracial violence in recorded history. Despite contemplatives’ relative peacefulness, other races often perceive them as aloof, overly logical, and emotionally sterile.

Contemplatives are able to speak, though their voices are reedy and soft. Most consider verbal communication rather crude, favoring telepathy. Those who regularly need to speak often wear inexpensive contact speakers that translate their telepathic thoughts into spoken words. They’re also able to sing in keening wails, although they rarely do so except around others of their kind or their most honored colleagues. The few ethnographers who study this behavior directly have compared the songs to religious paeans—an association contemplatives find absurd, in part because most prefer to study faith objectively rather than as worshipers.

Despite their frail appearance, contemplatives are able to survive in unforgiving environments. They find indoor sites far more comfortable, however especially areas that are cool and still, as these conditions facilitate their concentration. When contemplatives do build their own communities, the structures are often windowless and difficult to navigate for those unable to fly.

Aasimar

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 400

NG Medium outsider (native)

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 17

EAC: 11 KAC: 12

Fort: +1 Ref: +3 Will: +4

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: tactical dueling sword +4 (1d6 S)

Ranged: azimuth laser pistol +6 (1d4+1 F; critical burn 1d4) or frag grenade I +6 (explode [15 ft., 1d6 P, DC 12]) or smoke grenade I +6 (explode [20 ft., smoke cloud 1 minute, DC 12])

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +2 Con: +0 Wis: +1 Int: +0 Cha: +4

Skills: Culture +5, Diplomacy +10, Medicine +5, Sense Motive +10

Languages: Celestial, Elven, Common

Gear: flight suit stationwear, azimuth laser pistol with 2 batteries (20 charges each), tactical dueling sword, frag grenade I, smoke grenade I

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or band (3–6)

Special Abilities

Celestial Radiance (Su) As a standard action, an aasimar can shed light, causing light within 10 feet of him to increase two steps, up to bright, and light for 10 more feet beyond that to increase one step, up to normal. This lasts for 1 minute, but the aasimar can dismiss it as a swift action. Magical darkness can decrease the light level in this area only if it’s from an item or creature of a level or CR higher than that of the aasimar. An aasimar can use this ability once per day, plus a number of times equal to half his CR or level.

Description

Many kinds of extraplanar beings can infuse humanoids’ bloodlines, whether as a side effect of powerful magic or the result of a tryst; those in whom extraplanar traits surface strongly are known as planar scions. Aasimars and tieflings, the mortal offspring of celestials and fiends, respectively, are the most common of these. Though planar scions resemble their humanoid kin, their appearance and demeanor bear supernatural touches. Tieflings might have horns, vestigial wings, or cloven hooves, while aasimars may have glowing eyes or a metallic sheen to their hair and skin.

Because of their innate curiosity, humans are more likely to dally with outsiders, and as a consequence, a significant percentage of planar scions living in the Pact Worlds are descended from humans. However, because humans are far less populous than in pre-Gap eras, planar scions descended from other humanoid races are now far more numerous. A planar scion might pass for a member of the humanoid parent’s species, or the scion’s otherworldly features could make their origin obvious to those who are familiar with the species’ normal characteristics. Those whose outsider blood is evident still find acceptance in most major settlements across the Pact Worlds, where diverse beings coexist in peace. On Absalom Station, the hub of interspecies relations, few people bat an eye when they meet an aasimar or tiefling.

However, in insular or tradition-bound communities, any signs of plane-touched heritage can be a blessing—or a death sentence—depending on the dominant traditions. The demon-worshiping drow of Apostae see tieflings as a favor from demonic patrons, while the elves of Sovyrian on Castrovel are likely to banish children who bear such fiendish heritage. The Radiant Cathedral, on the other hand, trains aasimars to become beacons of the Sarenite faith, and also guides tieflings to a brighter future than their heritage suggests. Formians, shobhads, vesk, and other species with flexible morality view aasimars and tieflings, particularly those descended from their own kind, with both admiration and suspicion.

Planar scions are often outliers in their community, either put on a pedestal or ostracized because of their ancestry. The potent blood that courses through the veins of aasimars and tieflings also makes them ambitious; many choose a dangerous but rewarding profession, such as explorer, mercenary, spy, or pilot.

Adult Nyssholora

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 11 XP: 12,800

N Huge magical (beast)

Init.: +0 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision, telepathy sense 60 ft. Perception: +20

Defense

HP: 180

EAC: 24 KAC: 26

Fort: +15 Ref: +10 Will: +13

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: bite +24 (4d6+19 P plus swallow whole) or phasic claws +24 (2d8+19 So; critical wound [DC 18]) or tail scourge +24 (2d8+19 E)

Offensive Abilities: breath weapon (30-ft. cone, 11d6 So [see text], Reflex DC 18 half, usable every 1d6 rounds [see text]), swallow whole (4d6+19 B, EAC 24, KAC 22, 45 HP)

Statistics

Str: +8 Dex: +0 Con: +5 Wis: +3 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +25

Ecology

Environment: temperate or warm plains (Castrovel)

Organization: solitary, pair, or brood (1–2 adults plus 3–6 juveniles)

Special Abilities

Breath Weapon (Su) A creature that fails its saving throw against the breath weapon is also staggered for 1 round. This breath weapon ignores an object’s hardness. An adult nyssholora can't use its breath weapon if it has a creature grappled in its mouth or for at least 1 round after swallowing a creature.

Phasic Claws (Su) A nyssholora’s claws ignore half an object’s hardness.

Telepathy Sense (Su)

Description

Among the most feared and deadly apex predators on Castrovel, a nyssholora is a dinosaur-like monster that stalks the wilderness across both Asana and the Colonies. These fearless hunters eat whatever they can catch and kill. They have plagued lashuntas and formians enough to figure prominently in the mythology of both species for millennia.

A nyssholora resembles a tyrannosaur, standing on its hind legs and counterbalancing its massive head with a long, muscular tail. A nyssholora has a pair of upper appendages with claws that resemble scythe blades, as well as a smaller pair of similar arms the creature uses to mark its territory and communicate its location to offspring, hunting partners, or a mate. A wide maw filled with two rows of fangs dominates the creature’s head, and eight beady eyes run in two vertical rows along the bridge of its nose. A wide, flat crest tops its skull, behind which writhe a mass of short, smooth tentacles. A smaller bundle of tentacles tips the nyssholora’s tail. These tentacles serve two purposes. First, the nyssholora uses them to collect energy from the atmosphere. Second, they aid the nyssholora in sensing the presence of telepathic prey, including formians and lashuntas. Stealth in the plains is all but impossible for a creature the size of a nyssholora, and it makes little effort to camouflage itself, sporting bright neon striations of yellow and orange across its thick purple or pink hide.

Nyssholoras nest and lay eggs, and both parents keep watch over unhatched young in the treacherous Castrovelian wilderness. Brooding nyssholoras are particularly aggressive, due to hunger and the desire to protect their offspring. When young nyssholoras hatch, they remain in the nest for only a day. They then stay near a parent, learning how to hunt. Juvenile nyssholoras become more and more independent over the course of a month and then set out on their own or in small groups that typically end up breaking up a couple months later. Adult nyssholoras have been known to respond to distress calls of their own offspring up to a year after separation.

The people of Castrovel hunt nyssholoras to keep their numbers down. Big-game hunters collect the beasts’ phasic claws, the third segment of the creature’s forearms. These bladed talons are sharp, but their real danger is that they vibrate at ultrasonic speeds, creating a blade of concentrated sound waves that precedes the physical structure of the claw as it swipes through the air. This can cut through even extremely dense materials. Because of these adaptations, Castrovelian scientists have long believed that nyssholoras evolved to hunt prey that had both telepathy and preternaturally strong armor. This hypothetical prey has long since vanished from Castrovel, but the nyssholora, lacking predators to challenge its position at the top of the food chain, has remained. More than one nyssholora has used its talons to carve open vehicle hulls or cut into city walls to get at prey.

Similarly, the volume and force with which a nyssholora releases its low, resonant roar are enough to weaken the structural integrity of buildings and concuss the bodies of other creatures. This mighty bellow offers potential prey an early warning to the beast’s approach since, in the absence of overwhelming ambient noise, a nyssholora’s cry can be heard as far as 20 miles away. The beast’s roar is so iconic that an entire genre of loud, growling music popular among korasha lashuntas adopted its name—originally as an insult from the style’s detractors, but quickly embraced by fans. Nyssholoran roar performances can be heard in counterculture hot spots throughout the Pact Worlds.

In its horizontal walking pose, an adult nyssholora is 15 feet tall at the hip but can stand upright to over 20 feet. The typical adult nyssholora stretches as much as 40 feet from the tip of its tail to its nose and weighs 15 tons, although formian and lashunta legends tell of epic specimens two or three times recorded sizes. Juvenile nyssholoras are less than half the size and weigh almost 2 tons.

Adult Silver Dragon

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 14 XP: 38,400

LG Huge dragon (cold)

Init.: +3 Senses: blindsense (vibration) 60 ft., darkvision 120 ft., detect alignment, low-light vision Perception: +25

Aura: frightful presence (200 ft., DC 22)

Defense

HP: 235

EAC: 28 KAC: 29

Fort: +14 Ref: +14 Will: +19

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., fly 200 ft. (Ex, clumsy), cloudwalking

Melee: bite +26 (6d6+22 P)

Offensive Abilities: breath weapon (50-ft. cone, 15d8 C, Reflex DC 22 half, usable every 1d4 rounds), crush (6d6+22 B), paralyzing breath (30-ft cone, 1d6+7 rounds, DC 22)

Statistics

Str: +8 Dex: +3 Con: +3 Wis: +3 Int: +6 Cha: +4

Skills: Acrobatics +25 (+17 to fly), Computers +30, Diplomacy +30, Disguise +25, Life Science +30, Mysticism +25, Physical Science +30, Sense Motive +25

Languages: Auran, Common, Draconic, Dwarven, Terran

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Cloudwalking (Su) A silver dragon can tread on clouds or fog as though on solid ground.

Paralyzing Breath (Su) Instead of a cone of cold, a silver dragon can breathe a 30-foot cone of paralyzing gas. Each creature within the cone that inhales the gas must succeed at a Fortitude save or be paralyzed for 1d6 rounds plus a number of additional rounds equal to half the dragon’s CR.

Description

Dragons are powerful reptilian creatures of high intelligence and great ingenuity. The vast majority of dragons fall into one of two categories: chromatic or metallic (though other categories exist). Chromatic dragons are often evil, indulging in machinations that benefit themselves or destroy their enemies. Metallic dragons (see below) are generally good, endeavoring to improve societal conditions for everyone. Dragons usually grow larger as they age, though a few dragons undergo expensive genetic modifications to remain small enough to fit within starships and space stations built by the humanoids of the Pact Worlds. Others develop the supernatural ability to change their forms to blend in with Pact Worlds society.

Several metallic dragons lead countries and corporations found within the Drakelands of Triaxus, occasionally engaging in warfare (corporate and militaristic) with the chromatic dragons of that planet. The metallic dragons claim these struggles are for the good of those under their care, though those same people are sometimes trampled in the process.

Akata

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 400

N Medium aberration

Init.: +6 Senses: blindsense (life) 10 ft., blindsense (scent) 60 ft., darkvision 120 ft. Perception: +5

Defense

HP: 18

EAC: 12 KAC: 13

Fort: +3 Ref: +3 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: bite +8 (1d6+2 P plus void bite)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +2 Con: +4 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +5, Athletics +5 (+13 to climb), Stealth +10

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, pack (3–11), or colony (12–30)

Special Abilities

Deaf (Ex) Akatas cannot attempt Perception checks to listen and are immune to effects that rely on hearing to function.

Hibernation (Ex) Akatas can enter a state of hibernation for an indefinite period of time when food is scarce. After 3 or more days without eating, an akata can secrete a fibrous material that hardens into a dense cocoon of the starmetal called noqual. The cocoon has hardness 30 and 30 Hit Points, and it is immune to bludgeoning and fire damage. As long as the cocoon remains intact, the akata within remains unharmed. The akata remains in a state of hibernation until it is exposed to extreme heat or senses a living creature with its blindsense, at which point it claws itself free of its cocoon in 1d4 minutes, leaving the fragments of its cocoon behind.

Susceptible to Salt Water (Ex) A splash of salt water deals 1d6 damage to an akata, and full immersion in salt water deals 4d6 damage per round.

Void Bite (Ex) Akatas hold hundreds of microscopic larval young within their mouths, and they spread their parasitic offspring to hosts through their bite. Only humanoids make suitable hosts for akata young—all other creature types are immune to this parasitic infection. This affliction is known as void death.

Void Death

Type disease (injury); Save Fortitude DC 10
Track physical; Frequency 1/day
Effect No latent/carrier state; an infected creature that dies rises as a void zombie 2d4 hours later.
Cure 2 consecutive saves

Description

Anacite Ambassador

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

LN Medium construct (technological)

Init.: +3 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +13

Defense

HP: 90

EAC: 18 KAC: 20

Fort: +3 Ref: +3 Will: +7

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: slam +13 (1d6+6 B)

Ranged: retractable laser +15 (1d6+6 F; critical burn 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +3 Con:Wis: +1 Int: +4 Cha: +4

Skills: Bluff +13, Culture +18, Diplomacy +18, Sense Motive +13

Languages: Common, up to four others; shortwave 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any (Aballon)

Organization: solitary or pair

Special Abilities

Language Assimilation (Ex) An anacite ambassador can spend 1 minute accessing a planet’s infosphere to learn any language commonly spoken on that planet. Alternatively, the anacite can learn a language by spending 1 day listening to it and reading it. An anacite ambassador can store knowledge of up to four languages at a time in this way, and it can choose which language to replace when it wants to learn a new one.

Light Dependency (Ex) An anacite ambassador can acquire power from dim or brighter light, and it can store power generated in this way. The anacite can operate in darkness for 2 hours. After this time, the anacite gains the sickened condition until it returns to an area of dim or brighter light.

Retractable Laser (Ex) An anacite ambassador’s retractable laser has a range increment of 90 feet. When not in use, this weapon is folded inside the anacite’s arm and hidden from sight. A creature unaware of the anacite’s hidden weapon must succeed at a DC 24 Perception check to find its compartment. The anacite can deploy or retract this weapon as a swift action or as part of making an attack or full attack. The weapon is mounted and leaves the anacite’s hands free, and the anacite can’t be disarmed of it. While deployed, the laser can be sundered as an item with a level equal to the anacite’s CR.

Shortwave (Ex) An anacite can communicate wirelessly. This acts as telepathy, but only with other creatures with this ability or constructs with the technological subtype.

Description

Anacites are native to Aballon, the Pact World closest to the sun. A race of machines left behind by eons-departed masters, these constructs developed the capacity for evolution and self-improvement, creating an entire mechanical ecosystem.

The most common design for anacites is a basic arthropodan form of silvery metal, with multiple legs for efficient travel and claws or manipulators for accomplishing their assigned tasks. Depending on their role, however, an anacite might be anything from a bulldozer-sized mining specialist to a floating electronic brain designed for advanced problem-solving, and even those anacites who fit the stereotypical metal-insect design usually have a modification or two, and almost all anacites can reconfigure parts of themselves to adapt to their circumstances.

In the uncounted millennia since the departure of the so-called “First Ones,” anacites have not been idle. The two primary factions of anacites, Those Who Wait and Those Who Become, have very different ideas of their purpose in life, yet the two are more alike than different. While they variously wait for the First Ones to return or work toward taking on their progenitors’ mantle, anacites endlessly strive to acquire wealth and influence in preparation for their great goal’s fulfillment.

While “anacite” officially refers only to the sentient varieties of Aballonian machines—those capable of learning and participating in Aballonian society—many offworlders use it as a catchall term for the world’s mechanical life. Dragonflylike wingbots are an example of Aballonian technobiology. These artificial creatures lack basic sentience yet nevertheless reproduce and fill one of the planet’s ecological niches. These 4-foot-long machines whir from ridge to ridge on wings glittering with solar panels, feeding on the blazing light of the sun. Wingbots can be territorial, and they occasionally attack offworlders or other anacites.

Anacite Predator Drone

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 10 XP: 9,600

LN Large construct (technological)

Init.: +5 Senses: blindsight (heat) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +19

Defense

HP: 165

EAC: 23 KAC: 25

Fort: +10 Ref: +10 Will: +7

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 60 ft. (Ex, perfect)

Melee: horn +23 (2d10+18 P)

Ranged: integrated automatic laser +20 (4d4+10 F; critical 2d4 burn) or integrated electric ray +20 (3d6+10 E; critical 2d6 arc)

Offensive Abilities: target lock

Statistics

Str: +8 Dex: +5 Con:Wis: +3 Int: +0 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +19 (+27 to fly), Athletics +24, Stealth +19

Languages: Common; shortwave 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any (Aballon)

Organization: solitary, pair, or squadron (3–6)

Special Abilities

Automatic Laser (Ex) An anacite predator drone’s automatic laser can fire in automatic mode each round at up to five targets. The weapon has a range increment of 60 feet.

Electric Ray (Ex) An anacite predator drone’s electric ray has a range increment of 60 feet.

Shortwave (Ex) An anacite can communicate wirelessly. This acts as telepathy, but only with other creatures with this ability or constructs with the technological subtype.

Sunlight Dependency (Ex) Anacites are solar-powered constructs, although they can function at reduced capacity away from light. In areas of darkness, they gain the sickened condition.

Target Lock (Ex) As a move action, an anacite predator drone can lock on to a target within 60 feet that it can see. The anacite can have only one locked target at a time. Against the anacite’s attacks, a locked target gains no benefit from concealment less than total concealment, and a locked target reduces its bonus to AC due to cover by 2.

Description

Anacites are native to Aballon, the Pact World closest to the sun. A race of machines left behind by eons-departed masters, these constructs developed the capacity for evolution and self-improvement, creating an entire mechanical ecosystem.

The most common design for anacites is a basic arthropodan form of silvery metal, with multiple legs for efficient travel and claws or manipulators for accomplishing their assigned tasks. Depending on their role, however, an anacite might be anything from a bulldozer-sized mining specialist to a floating electronic brain designed for advanced problem-solving, and even those anacites who fit the stereotypical metal-insect design usually have a modification or two, and almost all anacites can reconfigure parts of themselves to adapt to their circumstances.

In the uncounted millennia since the departure of the so-called “First Ones,” anacites have not been idle. The two primary factions of anacites, Those Who Wait and Those Who Become, have very different ideas of their purpose in life, yet the two are more alike than different. While they variously wait for the First Ones to return or work toward taking on their progenitors’ mantle, anacites endlessly strive to acquire wealth and influence in preparation for their great goal’s fulfillment.

While “anacite” officially refers only to the sentient varieties of Aballonian machines—those capable of learning and participating in Aballonian society—many offworlders use it as a catchall term for the world’s mechanical life. Dragonflylike wingbots are an example of Aballonian technobiology. These artificial creatures lack basic sentience yet nevertheless reproduce and fill one of the planet’s ecological niches. These 4-foot-long machines whir from ridge to ridge on wings glittering with solar panels, feeding on the blazing light of the sun. Wingbots can be territorial, and they occasionally attack offworlders or other anacites.

Anchorite

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 4 XP: 1,200

LE Medium outsider (evil)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 50

EAC: 16 KAC: 18

Fort: +6 Ref: +8 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: ascetic velstrac flenser +10 (1d4+5 S & So; critical bleed 1d4)

Ranged: tactical acid dart rifle +13 (1d8+4 A & P; critical corrode 1d4) or frag grenade II +13 (explode [15 ft., 2d6 P, DC 13])

Offensive Abilities: unnerving gaze (30 ft., DC 13)

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +5 Con: +3 Wis: +1 Int: +0 Cha: +1

Skills: Acrobatics +15, Athletics +10, Intimidate +10, Sense Motive +10

Languages: Common, Infernal; telepathy 30 ft.

Gear: velstrac harness (functions as defrex hide), tactical acid dart rifle with 20 darts, ascetic velstrac flenser (see page 129) with 1 battery (20 charges), frag grenades II (2)

Ecology

Environment: any (Shadow Plane)

Organization: solitary, pair, habit (3–6), or priory (7–12)

Special Abilities

Paired Pain (Su) As a reaction after taking damage, an anchorite can telepathically link with a willing allied velstrac that it can see within 30 feet. When either of the velstracs paired in this way takes further damage, that damage is divided evenly between the two. A velstrac of a higher CR can share its damage with an anchorite while refusing to take the anchorite’s shared damage. An anchorite already paired with another velstrac can’t use this ability to create a new pair. The pairing lasts for 1 minute, until one of the pair dies, or until one of the pair ends it as a move action. The pairing also ends if one partner is ever more than 30 feet from the other.

Unnerving Gaze (Su) The anchorite’s visage causes viewers to see themselves as the subject of the velstrac’s selfmutilation. A creature that fails a DC 13 Will save against this gaze is shaken for 1 round. This is a mind-affecting, fear effect.

Description

Sometimes called “kytons” by mortals, velstracs are cruel fiends who dwell on the Shadow Plane. Each velstrac seeks to unlock its highest potential by following a path of methodical, self-inflicted pain while also psychically feeding on the fear and anguish of mortal creatures. Velstracs care only for this path of pain and its mystical destination; they see “lesser” beings as nothing more than stepping-stones for their own ascension.

Transformation requires a velstrac to excise pieces of itself, spiritually and physically. Dross is cut away and replaced with grafts—artificial or natural, flesh or spirit, magical or technological. Each graft brings the velstrac closer to its ideal state and increases its power. In this practice, velstracs are more fanatical than even the Augmented are about cybernetic augmentations. The emotions and pain experienced during each step, they believe, cause spiritual evolution.

Legend holds that the first velstracs emerged when mortals conceived of cruelty as an acceptable means of personal advancement. The goodly gods, astonished and dismayed, chained the velstracs in Hell. However, instead of struggling against their bonds, the velstracs subsumed their chains and eventually escaped into the Shadow Plane.

Velstracs leave the Shadow Plane to prey on sentient creatures. They maintain installations and portals in dark locales, launching forays into the Material Plane from such places. Most mortals who fall into velstrac clutches are doomed to live out the remainder of their days—or minutes—in agony. However, such mortals can sometimes become velstracs themselves. The supposed methods of this shift differ wildly, but all involve terrible suffering that only escalates after the transformation is complete. These newest velstracs often become anchorites, fiendish ascetics devoted to the torment of themselves as much as of others. An anchorite’s first act must be to willingly mutilate its flesh, showing its dedication to the velstrac way.

Anchorites are among the lowest-ranking fiends in the velstrac hierarchy. Often working in pairs or squads, they are crafters, gophers, and soldiers. Anchorite labor produces the majority of velstrac equipment, from their starships to their hide armors with inward-pointing studs and spikes. Anchorites take pains to make their creations macabre and ornate. These velstracs also make up the rank and file of velstrac exploration teams and starship crews.

In battle, anchorites aim to inflict maximum amounts of delicious agony upon themselves and their foes. Sharing pain is an ecstasy to anchorites as they guide each other along the path of evolution. Few velstracs of any sort refuse to telepathically pair with an anchorite and at least taste its pain, and it’s a rare and disgraceful act for an anchorite to refuse to share with another. A stronger velstrac who takes advantage of an anchorite to survive an otherwise deadly conflict is not considered to be acting dishonorably because in velstrac doctrine, the weak exist to serve the needs of the mighty. All velstracs answer to the demands of their strongest, the velstrac demagogues.

A clear hierarchy commands all velstrac groupings, including the fiends’ starfaring forces. The velstracs’ fast and sleek

serve as heavy scouts and raiders, cutting into enemy territory and fleets like serrated blades. In starship combat, corvette crews fight as they would in personal combat, with the aim to deal maximum damage as brutally as possible. After strafing disabled ships with chain cannons, corvettes usually make boarding maneuvers to take prisoners. Corvette anchorite crews have even been known to use their escape pods as ballistic weapons against ships with weakened defenses, hoping to overcome those defenses and, perhaps, to improvise boarding at the same time.

Velstracs wield

—blades designed to slice skin from muscle and muscle from bone—sometimes mounting these knives on rifles as bayonets. Flensers are honed to supernatural sharpness and powered to vibrate with the rhythms of the wielder’s body. Velstracs have mastered the art of using these advanced melee weapons to inflict wounds while keeping targets alive. The table above shows an array of flensers, which can be purchased only in the darkest corners of the galaxy.

Arquand Gazelle

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 4 XP: 1,200

N Large animal

Init.: +5 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +10

Aura: tranquility (60 ft., DC 13)

Defense

HP: 50

EAC: 16 KAC: 18

Fort: +7 Ref: +9 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 50 ft.

Melee: gore +9 (1d6+7 P) or if not docile +12 (1d6+7 P; critical bleed 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: stampede, trample (1d6+7, DC 13)

Statistics

Str: +3 Dex: +5 Con: +0 Wis: +0 Int: -4 Cha: +1

Skills: Athletics +15

Ecology

Environment: any forests, hills, or plains (Arquand)

Organization: solitary, pair, or herd (4–40)

Special Abilities

Arquand Immunities (Su) While on their native planet, Arquand gazelles don’t age and are immune to disease, exhaustion, and fatigue.

Docile (Ex) Arquand gazelles are naturally unaggressive creatures. An Arquand gazelle loses this weakness if trained for combat, a function of the rear a wild animal task of the Survival skill.

Stampede (Ex) A stampede occurs if three or more Arquand gazelles trample while remaining adjacent to each other. While stampeding, the gazelles can trample foes of their size or smaller, and the trample ability’s save DC increases by 2.

Tranquility Aura (Su) An Arquand gazelle exudes tranquility that has a sedative effect and causes mild hallucinations in creatures within 60 feet. Such hallucinations are pleasant if the gazelle is docile and on Arquand, but less pleasant if the gazelle isn’t on Arquand, wasn’t born on Arquand, or lacks the docile weakness. The effects are unpleasant if the gazelle is aggressive or scared; a creature in the aura must succeed at a DC 13 Will saving throw to attack, cast any spell on an unwilling target, or take any action that involves breaking or disabling an object or device. Creatures that succeed at the save are immune to the same Arquand gazelle’s aura for 24 hours. Arquand gazelles are immune to this aura. This is a mind-affecting, emotion effect.

Description

Life on the sentient planet of Arquand is idyllic for its native inhabitants. Lithe, six-legged gazelles spring merrily over hills, peer at anything that sparks their curiosity, and playfully charge at each other. Arquand gazelles, like most native Arquand species, are friendly and trusting, especially to juvenile creatures of any species. They interact peacefully with one another and other indigenous animals.

The nimble creatures are black, brown, or white, depending on which part of their home planet they come from. Their home planet itself spurs them to wander, using weather and terrain to guide them and growing plentiful and nutritious vegetation and fruit wherever they roam. The gazelles graze contentedly on the abundant food, never knowing struggle, and grow up to 12 feet tall and just as long. They can weigh up to 1,600 pounds.

These gazelles have an unlimited lifespan on Arquand’s surface. They grow neither old nor ill, but they can be killed. Arquand gazelles reproduce very slowly. The creatures have no family units, instead living in large herds. If taken to a different planet, an Arquand gazelle lives up to 30 years. Would-be settlers on Arquand might see these elegant ungulates as a source of meat. Poachers have an easy time capturing the gazelles, which remain friendly even when caged. But killing them is much more difficult than it appears, as the beasts have a tranquilizing affect on beings near them. Successfully slaying a gazelle can mean more trouble, since Arquand doesn’t take kindly to those who harm its creatures or irritate it in other ways.

Many governments, including the Pact Council, have made the removal of gazelles from Arquand illegal. Nevertheless, the animals fetch a high price on the black market. Collectors of exotic pets prize Arquand gazelles; therefore, poachers brave the planet’s wrath to capture the beasts alive. Creative landowners purchase entire herds for security, since the animals’ tranquility aura prevents attacks and break-ins. Some people use the aura for self-medication, while others keep the affable and childloving gazelles as companion animals. Those under the pleasant effects of the gazelle’s aura can’t help but return the creature’s friendliness, so affection grows.

Gazelles accustomed to Arquand have difficulty adjusting to life on other planets. They have little natural survival instinct or skill, since foraging on Arquand is easy and safe. Severe weather spooks them because they never experience it on their home world. However, it is possible to breed Arquand gazelles on other worlds. Domesticated gazelles are still docile and still have a tranquility aura, but the aura is less pleasant, so most collectors prefer Arquand-born gazelles. Those who use the animals solely for security are less particular, and breeders can do brisk business with such clients. Breeding Arquand gazelles is commonly legal, but law officers keep an eye out for native-born animals in breeding stock.

Assassin Robot

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 9 XP: 6,400

N Medium construct (technological)

Init.: +6 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +22

Defense

HP: 135

EAC: 22 KAC: 23

Fort: +6 Ref: +10 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., climb 40 ft.

Melee: microserrated longsword +18 (2d10+13 S; critical bleed 2d6)

Ranged: advanced semi-auto pistol +20 (2d6+9 P) or advanced shirren-eye rifle +20 (2d10+9 P)

Offensive Abilities: holographic trick

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +6 Con:Wis: +2 Int: +1 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +22, Athletics +17 (+25 to climb), Computers +17, Stealth +22

Languages: Common

Gear: microserrated longsword, advanced semi-auto pistol with 48 small arm rounds, advanced shirren-eye rifle with 16 sniper rounds

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or team (3–5)

Special Abilities

Holographic Camouflage (Ex) An assassin robot uses advanced sensors in conjunction with a holographic projector to blend in with its surroundings. If the assassin robot remains still for 1 round, it gains a +10 bonus to Stealth checks and is treated as having concealment until it moves out of its square; this doesn’t stack with invisibility or similar effects. As a move action, the robot can amplify this camouflage for up to 10 rounds per day, using the duration in 1-round increments. While the camouflage is amplified, the robot is affected as if by the invisibility spell.

Holographic Trick (Ex) As a full action, an assassin robot can move up to its speed, blurred by holographic camouflage, and then make an attack with a one-handed melee weapon or small arm. After its movement, the robot can attempt a Stealth check; this check is opposed by a Perception check attempted by its target, and if the robot is successful, its target is flat-footed against the attack and takes 5d8 additional damage on a hit.

Nanite Repair (Ex) An assassin robot’s nanites heal it, restoring a number of Hit Points per hour equal to its CR. Once per day as a full action, the robot can regain 6d8 Hit Points.

Retractable Weapons (Ex) When not in use, each of an assassin robot’s weapons is folded inside the robot’s body and hidden from sight. A creature unaware of the robot’s hidden weapons must succeed at a DC 35 Perception check to notice one. An assassin robot can deploy any or all of its weapons as a swift action or as part of making an attack or full attack. Its weapons are mounted, leaving the robot’s hands free, and the robot can’t be disarmed of them. As a swift action, the robot can retract any or all of its weapons.

Target Tracking (Ex) As a move action, an assassin robot can lock on to one target it can see. The tracked target doesn’t benefit from concealment against the robot and can’t succeed at Bluff checks against the robot to create a diversion. This tracking ends if the tracked target dies or is destroyed, the robot ceases being able to see the target, or the robot ends it as a move action.

Description

Robots serve a variety of functions. They’re often employed in situations where the risks to living beings are too great or emotional responses are a hindrance—notably murder and war.

Assassin robots are killing machines useful for stealthy slayings or gruesome public displays. A user can program targets into the robot, dispatch the unit, and rest assured. The robot relentlessly pursues its quarry, fearing nothing and using microfiber setae on its hands and feet to traverse vertical and horizontal surfaces with ease. Whether it succeeds, fails, escapes, or suffers destruction, the robot leaves little evidence behind—an assassin robot that is captured or destroyed automatically purges its memory and burns out its sensitive hardware components, making tracing the robot’s mission and origin extremely difficult.

Typical assassin robots are 6 feet tall, weigh 300 pounds, and use the weapons detailed in the stat block on page 108, but they can be outfitted with other armaments as a mission requires. In particular, assassin robots on missions where more subtlety is called for use needler pistols stocked with poisoned darts.

There is nothing subtle, however, about a siege robot. These machines serve as artificially intelligent assault vehicles, and many rightly fear these engines of war. Merciless and efficient, a siege robot is as effective at unloading massive damage against a single target as it is at mowing down enemy troops en masse, and its vehicle form makes it difficult to escape from on an open battlefield. Most siege robots are outfitted with large reserves of ammunition, enough to sustain a constant barrage for minutes at a time.

A siege robot can be used as a vehicle in vehicle combat or vehicle chases. In such cases it acts as its own pilot and has the following additional statistics: item level equal to its CR; drive speed 60 ft., full speed 500 ft., overland speed 60 mph, (hover); hardness 8; collision damage 16d10 B (DC 19); –3 attack roll penalty (–6 at full speed). A siege robot acting as a vehicle can carry up to 4 Medium passengers but provides them no cover.

Bodysnatcher Autocrat

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 10 XP: 9,600

N Medium ooze

Init.: +5 Senses: blindsight (vibration) 60 ft. Perception: +19

Defense

HP: 140

EAC: 23 KAC: 23

Fort: +11 Ref: +8 Will: +11

Offense

Speed: 20 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: slam +20 (2d8+14 B plus grab)

Offensive Abilities: bodysnatch

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +5 Con: +5 Wis: +2 Int: -1 Cha: -1

Skills: Athletics +19 (+27 to climb), Bluff +24, Disguise +19, Stealth +24; see neural integration

Languages: See neural integration

Ecology

Environment: any land

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Bodysnatch (Ex) This ability functions as the bodysnatcher slime ability, but the autocrat can infest a Medium, Large, or Huge creature (Fortitude DC 19 negates). The autocrat can also use any of the creature’s supernatural abilities. It takes a DC 25 Medicine check to expel an autocrat, and each failed check deals the host 2d6 damage.

Neural Integration (Su) This ability functions as the bodysnatcher slime ability, but the skill bonus is +19.

Share Body (Ex) This ability functions as the bodysnatcher slime ability, but the autocrat leaves the host only after taking 70 or more damage.

Description

Purportedly born from some ill-informed experiment performed during the Gap, bodysnatcher slimes are parasitic organisms that commandeer hosts to experience life through their senses. Unlike most oozes, these slimes contain a complex yet amorphous neural network that enables learning, memory, and reasoning. These neurons can also integrate with a host’s nervous system, enabling nearly instantaneous communication between the two beings. Studies suggest the slimes replicate and absorb copies of their hosts’ neurons, so hypothetically, a prolific slime could grow smarter over time.

In most cases, though, a bodysnatcher slime never grows to occupy more than several cubic feet. Replicating neurons grants the slime greater control over its form, allowing it to grow and still coordinate its movements and metabolism. However, bigger oozes find it more difficult to fit inside hosts without causing the body to bulge such that it betrays the parasite’s presence. Furthermore, the slime’s modified neural network can develop multiple personalities that compete for resources and control. Ultimately, such a creature splits and forms two new slimes, each of which begins rebuilding the vast stores of knowledge and neurons that it lost in the process. Rarely, an ooze retains control over its growing mental prowess and so avoids splitting. These rare bodysnatcher autocrats selectively infest hosts they perceive as powerful.

As with humanoid brains, a slime’s neural network requires the slime to consume a large number of calories to sustain it While infesting a host, the slime draws its necessary nutrients from the host’s body and digestive system; this process adds a faintly citrus scent to the host’s sweat and excrement. However, without a host, a bodysnatcher slime can absorb nutrients from a wide variety of foods, favoring high-calorie options like sugars and flesh. When denied sustenance, the slime can enter hibernation, awaiting suitable prey for months at a time.

Bodysnatcher slimes aren’t malicious, but they are insidious. When spoken to, they are baffled by claims that abducting others is reprehensible. Given the oozes’ simple physiology and psychology, this mindset likely results from a lack of higher thought processes and capacity for self-reflection. However, bodysnatcher slimes grow increasingly ambitious the longer they spend in hosts and the larger they become, suggesting a moral compass doesn’t accompany greater intelligence.

Having stowed away on countless ships, the slimes have spread across the Pact Worlds, the Veskarium, and beyond. Stewards officers have logged several reports of people having extended blackouts and behaving strangely on Absalom Station, and although several operations have cornered and eliminated bodysnatcher slimes, the reports continue to come in. With increasing frequency, authorities contract independent trackers to eliminate these slimes; as such, the bodysnatchers have learned to recognize and avoid the Stewards. The oozes are common on Verces, where hosts have dispersed these parasites along the habitable Ring of Nations. Several cohorts of the Augmented have designated bodysnatcher slimes not as enemies but as intelligent biotech that they accept into their bodies.

Bodysnatcher Slime

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 3 XP: 800

N Small ooze

Init.: +3 Senses: blindsight (vibration) 60 ft. Perception: +8

Defense

HP: 33

EAC: 14 KAC: 14

Fort: +4 Ref: +2 Will: +4

Offense

Speed: 20 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: slam +9 (1d4+5 B plus grab)

Offensive Abilities: bodysnatch

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +3 Con: +2 Wis: +0 Int: -3 Cha: -1

Skills: Athletics +8 (+16 to climb), Disguise +8, Stealth +13; see neural integration

Languages: see neural integration

Ecology

Environment: any land

Organization: solitary or heist (2–5)

Special Abilities

Bodysnatch (Ex) If a bodysnatcher slime starts its turn grappling a Small, Medium, or Large living creature, the slime can distribute itself throughout that creature’s body as a swift action (Fortitude DC 14 negates). While infesting a creature in this way, a bodysnatcher slime has total cover and can take no actions. However, it controls the infested creature’s (host’s) actions, including using equipment and weapons (using the slime’s attack bonus), using the slime’s or its host’s saving throw bonuses (whichever is higher), using the host’s extraordinary abilities, and using the slime’s or its host’s natural attacks.

After 24 hours inside a body, a bodysnatcher slime must succeed at a DC 14 Fortitude save or be forced out of the body and be unable to infest that same creature for 24 hours. If it succeeds at the save, it can continue infesting that creature for another 24 hours. A creature adjacent to a pinned or helpless host can attempt a DC 15 Medicine check as a full action to force the slime to vacate the host and move into an adjacent square.

Bodysnatch is a compulsion effect that works on a living creature or the intact corpse of a living creature. The corpse can save as if it were its living version. Neural Integration (Su) While in a host, a bodysnatcher slime integrates with the creature’s neural physiology. The slime can speak and understand one language the host knows, use the host’s weapon proficiencies, and use three of the host’s trained skills with a +8 total bonus.

Share Body (Ex) Any damage dealt to a bodysnatcher slime’s host is split between the host and the slime. If a bodysnatcher slime takes 16 or more damage while in a host, the slime leaves the host, moving into an adjacent square, and cannot infest that host again for 24 hours.

Description

Purportedly born from some ill-informed experiment performed during the Gap, bodysnatcher slimes are parasitic organisms that commandeer hosts to experience life through their senses. Unlike most oozes, these slimes contain a complex yet amorphous neural network that enables learning, memory, and reasoning. These neurons can also integrate with a host’s nervous system, enabling nearly instantaneous communication between the two beings. Studies suggest the slimes replicate and absorb copies of their hosts’ neurons, so hypothetically, a prolific slime could grow smarter over time.

In most cases, though, a bodysnatcher slime never grows to occupy more than several cubic feet. Replicating neurons grants the slime greater control over its form, allowing it to grow and still coordinate its movements and metabolism. However, bigger oozes find it more difficult to fit inside hosts without causing the body to bulge such that it betrays the parasite’s presence. Furthermore, the slime’s modified neural network can develop multiple personalities that compete for resources and control. Ultimately, such a creature splits and forms two new slimes, each of which begins rebuilding the vast stores of knowledge and neurons that it lost in the process. Rarely, an ooze retains control over its growing mental prowess and so avoids splitting. These rare bodysnatcher autocrats selectively infest hosts they perceive as powerful.

As with humanoid brains, a slime’s neural network requires the slime to consume a large number of calories to sustain it While infesting a host, the slime draws its necessary nutrients from the host’s body and digestive system; this process adds a faintly citrus scent to the host’s sweat and excrement. However, without a host, a bodysnatcher slime can absorb nutrients from a wide variety of foods, favoring high-calorie options like sugars and flesh. When denied sustenance, the slime can enter hibernation, awaiting suitable prey for months at a time.

Bodysnatcher slimes aren’t malicious, but they are insidious. When spoken to, they are baffled by claims that abducting others is reprehensible. Given the oozes’ simple physiology and psychology, this mindset likely results from a lack of higher thought processes and capacity for self-reflection. However, bodysnatcher slimes grow increasingly ambitious the longer they spend in hosts and the larger they become, suggesting a moral compass doesn’t accompany greater intelligence.

Having stowed away on countless ships, the slimes have spread across the Pact Worlds, the Veskarium, and beyond. Stewards officers have logged several reports of people having extended blackouts and behaving strangely on Absalom Station, and although several operations have cornered and eliminated bodysnatcher slimes, the reports continue to come in. With increasing frequency, authorities contract independent trackers to eliminate these slimes; as such, the bodysnatchers have learned to recognize and avoid the Stewards. The oozes are common on Verces, where hosts have dispersed these parasites along the habitable Ring of Nations. Several cohorts of the Augmented have designated bodysnatcher slimes not as enemies but as intelligent biotech that they accept into their bodies.

Bolida Miner

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 2 XP: 600

CN Medium vermin

Init.: +5 Senses: blindsense (vibration) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +7

Defense

HP: 25

EAC: 14 KAC: 17

Fort: +4 Ref: +2 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., burrow 30 ft. (35 ft., burrow 25 ft. in armor)

Melee: tactical pike +10 (1d8+6 P)

Ranged: tactical crossbolter +7 (1d10+2 P) or frag grenade I +7 (explode [15 ft., 1d6 P, DC 11])

Offensive Abilities: fighting styles (blitz), rolling charge

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +1 Con: +2 Wis: +1 Int: +0 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +7, Physical Science +7, Survival +12

Languages: Bolidan, Common

Gear: hidden soldier armor, tactical crossbolter with 20 arrows, tactical pike, frag grenades I (2)

Ecology

Environment: any underground

Organization: solitary, pair, or convoy (3–6 miners plus 1 overseer)

Special Abilities

Defensive Ball (Ex) As a move action, a bolida can roll its body into a nearly impenetrable defensive ball. While rolled up this way, a bolida can only uncurl itself as a move action, take the total defense action, or use its rolling charge ability. If the bolida takes the total defense action, its bonus to AC is increased to +5.

Rolling Charge (Ex) A bolida that is rolled up in a defensive ball can charge without taking the normal charge penalties to the attack roll or its AC, and it gains a +5 circumstance bonus to AC against attacks of opportunity during its movement. It can’t make a melee attack at the end of its movement, but it can instead attempt either a bull rush or reposition combat maneuver against its target with a +4 circumstance bonus to the attack roll. A bolida can’t use this ability again until it takes a 10-minute rest to recover Stamina Points.

Description

Bolidas are arthropodan creatures that dwell not on the faces of the planets they inhabit, but far underground, in cave systems that are so deep below the surface that they are blasted by the unforgiving heat of the planets’ molten cores. The centipede-like creatures are protected from these extreme environs by metallic, chitinous plates that cover the entirety of their backs, from head to tail tip. This innate armor also protects them from subterranean hazards such as rock falls and the friction of traveling through cramped cave tunnels. Bolidas support themselves on their many sets of legs, holding only the uppermost portion of their bodies upright to wield weapons or manipulate objects. They have evolved over millions of years to thrive in darkness, and they therefore tend to avoid traveling up to the surface world; if they choose to live on a planet’s surface or a space station, they prefer to maintain nocturnal schedules, as sunlight blinds them if they’re not wearing protective eyewear.

Only a few decades ago, a group of offworld explorers on the bolidas’ home planet, Zafaiga, first encountered the modest miners while quarrying the unique stones that they assumed had no claimant. Though the bolidas were territorial, wary, and somewhat xenophobic, it was overall an amicable, if tense, meeting. Afterward, the bolidas reluctantly agreed to establish a mutually beneficial relationship with other species, contracting trade agreements and eventually even adopting Common into their lexicon. Though the broader galaxy has known of their existence for only a few decades, bolidas have been extant for millennia, unconcerned with and largely unaware of the outside world. They independently developed their own technology (though it is predominantly analog and therefore considered primitive by some races), which they use to dig for resources and excavate cavernous dwellings. Even those bolidas who travel the galaxy tend to be rather aloof, blowing off attempts at personal friendships by members of surface races, whom they dismiss as capricious “light dwellers.” They choose instead to spend their time alone, with other bolidas, or with members of subterranean races with whom they can share their passion for excavation.

Digging is a euphoric activity for bolidas, and they spend a large portion of their lives creating new tunnels and caves to house their ever-expanding populations. New settlements can grow from a single small cave to hundreds of miles of mazelike tunnels and dozens of vast caverns in mere months. Because of this natural disposition, bolidas have proven themselves to be indispensable in the acquisition and trade of rare minerals. Their ability to thrive in the heat deep underground on moltencore planets means they are often hired as miners by individuals and organizations all across the galaxy to excavate subterranean dig sites that most other races are unable to withstand.

Bolidas exhibit no discernible sexual dimorphism or gender, and each bolida is capable of carrying and fertilizing eggs—oftentimes they will take on both roles. They also sometimes mate in groups, covering the floors of their nursery caves with eggs that are incubated by the heat of the depths. The average bolida is 7 feet long and weighs 350 pounds.

Bolida Overseer

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

CN Medium vermin

Init.: +2 Senses: blindsense (vibration) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +18

Defense

HP: 115

EAC: 21 KAC: 22

Fort: +9 Ref: +9 Will: +9

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., burrow 30 ft.

Melee: carbon staff +17 (1d8+10 B; critical knockdown)

Ranged: advanced semi-auto pistol +15 (2d6+8 P)

Offensive Abilities: overload (DC 18), rolling charge, target tracking

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +2 Con: +4 Wis: +1 Int: +6 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +16, Engineering +21, Computers +21, Physical Science + 16, Survival +21

Languages: Bolidan, Common

Gear: kasatha microcord III, advanced semi-auto pistol with 24 small arm rounds, carbon staff

Ecology

Environment: any underground

Organization: solitary, pair, or convoy (1 overseer plus 3–6 miners)

Special Abilities

Defensive Ball (Ex) As a move action, a bolida can roll its body into a nearly impenetrable defensive ball. While rolled up this way, a bolida can only uncurl itself as a move action, take the total defense action, or use its rolling charge ability. If the bolida takes the total defense action, its bonus to AC is increased to +5.

Rolling Charge (Ex) A bolida that is rolled up in a defensive ball can charge without taking the normal charge penalties to the attack roll or its AC, and it gains a +5 circumstance bonus to AC against attacks of opportunity during its movement. It can’t make a melee attack at the end of its movement, but it can instead attempt either a bull rush or reposition combat maneuver against its target with a +4 circumstance bonus to the attack roll. A bolida can’t use this ability again until it takes a 10-minute rest to recover Stamina Points.

Description

Bolidas are arthropodan creatures that dwell not on the faces of the planets they inhabit, but far underground, in cave systems that are so deep below the surface that they are blasted by the unforgiving heat of the planets’ molten cores. The centipede-like creatures are protected from these extreme environs by metallic, chitinous plates that cover the entirety of their backs, from head to tail tip. This innate armor also protects them from subterranean hazards such as rock falls and the friction of traveling through cramped cave tunnels. Bolidas support themselves on their many sets of legs, holding only the uppermost portion of their bodies upright to wield weapons or manipulate objects. They have evolved over millions of years to thrive in darkness, and they therefore tend to avoid traveling up to the surface world; if they choose to live on a planet’s surface or a space station, they prefer to maintain nocturnal schedules, as sunlight blinds them if they’re not wearing protective eyewear.

Only a few decades ago, a group of offworld explorers on the bolidas’ home planet, Zafaiga, first encountered the modest miners while quarrying the unique stones that they assumed had no claimant. Though the bolidas were territorial, wary, and somewhat xenophobic, it was overall an amicable, if tense, meeting. Afterward, the bolidas reluctantly agreed to establish a mutually beneficial relationship with other species, contracting trade agreements and eventually even adopting Common into their lexicon. Though the broader galaxy has known of their existence for only a few decades, bolidas have been extant for millennia, unconcerned with and largely unaware of the outside world. They independently developed their own technology (though it is predominantly analog and therefore considered primitive by some races), which they use to dig for resources and excavate cavernous dwellings. Even those bolidas who travel the galaxy tend to be rather aloof, blowing off attempts at personal friendships by members of surface races, whom they dismiss as capricious “light dwellers.” They choose instead to spend their time alone, with other bolidas, or with members of subterranean races with whom they can share their passion for excavation.

Digging is a euphoric activity for bolidas, and they spend a large portion of their lives creating new tunnels and caves to house their ever-expanding populations. New settlements can grow from a single small cave to hundreds of miles of mazelike tunnels and dozens of vast caverns in mere months. Because of this natural disposition, bolidas have proven themselves to be indispensable in the acquisition and trade of rare minerals. Their ability to thrive in the heat deep underground on moltencore planets means they are often hired as miners by individuals and organizations all across the galaxy to excavate subterranean dig sites that most other races are unable to withstand.

Bolidas exhibit no discernible sexual dimorphism or gender, and each bolida is capable of carrying and fertilizing eggs—oftentimes they will take on both roles. They also sometimes mate in groups, covering the floors of their nursery caves with eggs that are incubated by the heat of the depths. The average bolida is 7 feet long and weighs 350 pounds.

Bone Trooper Captain

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

LE Medium undead

Init.: +10 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +16

Defense

HP: 125 RP: 4

EAC: 20 KAC: 23

Fort: +10 Ref: +10 Will: +9

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: None

Ranged: red star plasma pistol +19 (1d8+8 E & F; critical burn 1d8)

Offensive Abilities: fighting styles (arcane assailant), gear boosts (plasma immolation [1d8]), style techniques (rune of the eldritch knight, secret of the magi)

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +6 Con:Wis: +2 Int: +2 Cha: +2

Skills: Diplomacy +16, Engineering +16, Intimidate +16, Piloting +21

Languages: Common, Eoxian

Gear: skitterhide II (with black force field), officer dueling sword, red star plasma pistol with 3 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary or crew (1 plus 5–10 bone trooper technomancers)

Description

Using magic rituals, technomantic experiments, or both, powerful spellcasters can animate the bones of the dead. Although many of these undead are mindless and easily controlled, others retain their intellects, memories, and personalities, and thus they are able to continue a semblance of their former lives. Called skeletal champions in previous ages, these undead are now more commonly known as bone troopers because of their frequent association with the Corpse Fleet, a renegade starship navy of undead.

A member of almost any sapient species that has a skeleton can become a bone trooper. Bone troopers keep all of the abilities, class features, and skills they had when they were living, and they can benefit from class grafts. When the dead planet Eox suffered the cataclysm that nearly destroyed the world, its inhabitants looked to necromancy for their salvation. The most powerful elebrians became bone sages, but a significant proportion of Eox’s populace that managed to survive did so as bone troopers. As a result, most bone troopers in the Pact Worlds are elebrians from Eox, recognizable by the elongated elebrian cranium.

The Corpse Fleet employs countless elebrian bone troopers, which far outnumber other undead in the exiled navy’s ranks. Most of these troopers are soldiers, although many specialize as operatives, technomancers, or mindbreaker mystics.

A bone trooper looks like a fleshless skeleton with a cold, cunning light burning in its eye sockets. Bone troopers wear normal clothing or armor and wield contemporary weapons.

Bone Trooper Technomancer

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 3 XP: 800

LE Medium undead

Init.: +7 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +8

Defense

HP: 34

EAC: 13 KAC: 14

Fort: +2 Ref: +2 Will: +8

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: tactical dueling sword +5 (1d6+4 S) or claw +5 (1d4+4 S)

Ranged: tactical semi-auto pistol +7 (1d6+3 P)

Offensive Abilities: None

Spells Known: Spells Known

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +3 Con:Wis: +0 Int: +4 Cha: +1

Skills: Computers +13, Mysticism +8, Piloting +13

Languages: Common, Eoxian

Gear: skitterhide I, tactical dueling sword, tactical semi-auto pistol with 36 small arm rounds

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or platoon (3-12)

Description

Using magic rituals, technomantic experiments, or both, powerful spellcasters can animate the bones of the dead. Although many of these undead are mindless and easily controlled, others retain their intellects, memories, and personalities, and thus they are able to continue a semblance of their former lives. Called skeletal champions in previous ages, these undead are now more commonly known as bone troopers because of their frequent association with the Corpse Fleet, a renegade starship navy of undead.

A member of almost any sapient species that has a skeleton can become a bone trooper. Bone troopers keep all of the abilities, class features, and skills they had when they were living, and they can benefit from class grafts. When the dead planet Eox suffered the cataclysm that nearly destroyed the world, its inhabitants looked to necromancy for their salvation. The most powerful elebrians became bone sages, but a significant proportion of Eox’s populace that managed to survive did so as bone troopers. As a result, most bone troopers in the Pact Worlds are elebrians from Eox, recognizable by the elongated elebrian cranium.

The Corpse Fleet employs countless elebrian bone troopers, which far outnumber other undead in the exiled navy’s ranks. Most of these troopers are soldiers, although many specialize as operatives, technomancers, or mindbreaker mystics.

A bone trooper looks like a fleshless skeleton with a cold, cunning light burning in its eye sockets. Bone troopers wear normal clothing or armor and wield contemporary weapons.

Calecor

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 17 XP: 102,400

CN Large fey

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +29

Defense

HP: 300 RP: 6

EAC: 30 KAC: 31

Fort: +17 Ref: +17 Will: +20

Offense

Speed: 60 ft., fly 120 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: slam +25 (8d6+21 B plus ruined mind)

Offensive Abilities: ruined mind, sympathetic ruin

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +5 Con: +4 Wis: +8 Int: +2 Cha: +11

Skills: Acrobatics +29 (+37 to fly), Life Science +34, Survival +34

Languages: truespeech

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Planetary Bond (Su) A calecor is bonded to a planet devastated by cataclysm. The creature is dimly aware of everything happening on that world. However, this deluge of information is difficult for it to process. The calecor has a 33% chance to become aware of anything occurring on the planet that might affect the fey, its goals, or the world itself. Once aware of an event, the calecor can take a full action to observe that occurrence as if using clairaudience/clairvoyance, but without any restrictions on range and duration. This ability functions even when the calecor is not on the bonded planet, and the entire planet is considered to be familiar to the calecor.

Ruined Mind (Su) A calecor’s traumatized and divided mind makes the fey dangerous to interact with on a mental level. Any creature that touches a calecor (or is touched by one), uses mind-affecting or mind-reading magic on the fey, or attempts to communicate with it telepathically must attempt a DC 24 Will save. On a failure, the creature takes 4d10 damage and becomes confused for 1 round. The calecor can suppress this ability at will. This is a mind-affecting effect.

Sympathetic Ruin (Su) As a standard action, the calecor can project the mental torment of its ruined mind into the mind of a creature within 250 feet. If the target fails the save against ruined mined, it suffers the effects of that ability.

Description

When a world suffers a global calamity—a tremendous loss of resident life-forms due to asteroid impact, rapid climate change, war, or other apocalyptic scenario—the ramifications can ripple far beyond that planet. In some cases, as the torrent of souls leaves the planet, bound for Pharasma’s Boneyard, some of the life energy from dying fey creatures and nonsentient organisms ripples back to the First World, tearing a hole in the fabric of the Material Plane. The essence of the First World surrounds and contains this blast of anguished energy, waves of planar force wrapping around it like an oyster making a pearl, until the two elements combine and solidify into a new entity, a calecor.

A calecor is the fey embodiment of the planetary disaster that birthed it—nature’s violent reaction to the cycle of birth, growth, evolution, and death being catastrophically and irreparably interrupted. Biologists and mystics are unsure why some disasters result in the creation of a calecor while others do not. After all, most planets suffer events that were disastrous for some and beneficial for others, and evolution itself kills off existing species through natural processes, such as when newly evolved trees absorb enough carbon dioxide from an atmosphere to cause global cooling. To date, the best theory is that the dying fey associated with a world’s biome have an innate sense of a planet’s natural order, a sort of racial memory for the planet as a whole. Therefore, only extinctions that this aggregate fey consciousness deems the work of outside actors trigger enough resentment to coalesce into a calecor.

Calecors not only take forms suiting their planet’s primary environments, but also have sphinx-like shapes, with the body of a hunting cat and great wings of overlapping leaves. A calecor’s body is formed not of flesh, but rather vines that wrap and twist around pieces of broken stone, such as rubble from a native civilization destroyed by the calamity. Instead of a head, the vines of the creature’s neck writhe up and cradle a holographic globe split down the middle into two pieces: a perfect, real-time representation of the calecor’s bonded world. A calecor is 10 feet tall and can weigh more than 6 tons.

Always encountered singly, calecors have little culture and might not even be aware of the existence of other calecors. As soon as a calecor emerges into consciousness, its first action is to leave the First World and travel back through the planar breach to the world whose death spawned it. Once there, it does everything in its power to undo the damage and reset the ecosystem to a stable state, magically tearing down the structures of those it deems responsible for the tragedy and terraforming regions too blasted to support life. So deep is the calecor’s bond to its planet that it instinctively knows everything happening on or within it, and it is able to see and hear events on the other side of the world just by thinking about it.

Instinctively able to speak any language, a calecor’s mind is nevertheless as broken as the globe that forms its head, its mind split between painful visions of the past and the overwhelming desire to heal and nurture. Those who attempt to make psychic contact with the creatures report a devastating, disorienting whirlwind of different thoughts—the death cries of a billion organisms—and such contact can seriously harm those who lack superior mental fortitude.

Although not inherently bellicose, and in fact gentle toward organisms it deems in need of recovery or repopulation, a calecor has no patience for those who would despoil its world or oppose its mission. In such situations, interlopers might be warned off with painful visions of the terrifying apocalypse that led to the calecor’s birth. If that tactic doesn’t work, a calecor shifts gravity to keep foes off-kilter while it picks them off, breaking minds and disintegrating bodies until the threat is neutralized. Those who can convince the calecor that their goals align, however, might find themselves with the most powerful ally on the planet.

Cerebric Fungus Voyager

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 9 XP: 6,400

N Medium plant

Init.: +0 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +22

Aura: unsettling appearance (60 ft., DC 18)

Defense

HP: 115

EAC: 21 KAC: 22

Fort: +10 Ref: +8 Will: +12

Offense

Speed: 30 ft. (fly 20 ft. [Su, average] in space), starflight

Melee: incapacitator +17 (3d4+11 B nonlethal; critical staggered [DC 18]) or tendril +17 (3d4+11 S plus grab; critical stunned)

Ranged: aphelion laser pistol +15 (3d4+9 F; critical burn 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: star shriek (DC 18)

Spells Known: Known

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +0 Con: +4 Wis: +6 Int: +2 Cha: +3

Skills: Acrobatics +17, Bluff +17, Diplomacy +22, Mysticism +22, Piloting +17

Languages: telepathy 100 ft.

Gear: d-suit II, aphelion laser pistol with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each), incapacitator with 2 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or excursion (1–2 plus 4–10 cerebric fungi)

Special Abilities

Otherworldly Mind (Ex) Any non-plant creature attempting to read a cerebric fungus’s mind with a divination spell or similar effect must succeed at the listed Will save or be overwhelmed by its alien thoughts. A creature that fails takes 1d6 damage and is confused for 1d3 rounds, and the divination effect immediately ends.

Star Shriek (Ex) Once per day as a full action, a cerebric fungus can unleash a shrill scream in tones that are difficult for minds to process. Each non-plant creature within 30 feet must succeed at the listed Will save or be nauseated for 1 round. This is a sonic, mind-affecting effect.

Unsettling Appearance (Su)

Description

Cerebric fungi are carnivorous plants, but they are also intelligent interstellar explorers with colonies in many star systems, including the Pact Worlds, where they have carved out homes in corners of Castrovel and the Liavaran moon Nchak. Within the colonies of their isolated home system in the Vast, cerebric fungi debate philosophy and mysticism to perfect their shared understanding of the universe and to outshine the intellectual insights of the other colonies.

In an effort to prove esoteric points on behalf of their home colonies—or to spite other colonies—cerebric fungi enjoy studying creatures less intelligent than themselves. The fungi have been pleased to find suitable subjects on other planets.

Cerebric fungi greet strangers they meet with telepathic questions that might seem inane or even senseless. The fungi have difficulty comprehending the needs and concerns of non-fungoid creatures and easily distress others with experiments meant not to harm but rather to test pet theories.

With millennia of starflight and space exploration informing their culture, cerebric fungi can offer information that other civilizations would otherwise have little chance of learning. However, it often takes much time, patience, and psychic fortitude for other creatures to interpret a cerebric fungus’s insights, as elements other creatures might consider necessary context, the fungus considers obvious or irrelevant. The typical cerebric fungus is approximately 4 feet in diameter and weighs 150 pounds.

Cerebric fungi reproduce by budding. They can also grow specialized buds, removing them before they reach maturity, to produce living computers. By adjusting the timing and chemical mixture of this process, cerebric fungi can create computer modules and countermeasures that can be incorporated into any computer. Cerebric fungi sell their creations to fund further explorations. A fungal computer’s base cost is 10% higher than a normal computer and has the following traits.

: A fungal computer can synthesize its own energy from most atmospheres. This functions as a free self-charging upgrade.

: A fungal computer has a complex network and a fibrous core that can’t be reduced in size. No miniaturization upgrade can be applied to a fungal computer.

: A fungal computer has only a telepathic user interface (see the upgrade below). A hacking kit can access a fungal computer, but otherwise a typical computer with a complex control module must be purchased separately and installed to provide a digital interface for a fungal computer.

Cerebric Fungus

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 3 XP: 800

N Medium plant

Init.: +3 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +8

Aura: unsettling appearance (60 ft., DC 14)

Defense

HP: 26

EAC: 13 KAC: 14

Fort: +4 Ref: +2 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: bite +7 (1d4+4 P) or tendril +7 (1d4+4 S plus grab; critical stunned)

Offensive Abilities: star shriek (DC 14)

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +0 Con: +2 Wis: +4 Int: +1 Cha: +1

Skills: Bluff +13, Diplomacy +13, Stealth +8

Languages: telepathy 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or colony (3–12)

Special Abilities

Otherworldly Mind (Ex) Any non-plant creature attempting to read a cerebric fungus’s mind with a divination spell or similar effect must succeed at the listed Will save or be overwhelmed by its alien thoughts. A creature that fails takes 1d6 damage and is confused for 1d3 rounds, and the divination effect immediately ends.

Star Shriek (Ex) Once per day as a full action, a cerebric fungus can unleash a shrill scream in tones that are difficult for minds to process. Each non-plant creature within 30 feet must succeed at the listed Will save or be nauseated for 1 round. This is a sonic, mind-affecting effect.

Unsettling Appearance (Su)

Description

Cerebric fungi are carnivorous plants, but they are also intelligent interstellar explorers with colonies in many star systems, including the Pact Worlds, where they have carved out homes in corners of Castrovel and the Liavaran moon Nchak. Within the colonies of their isolated home system in the Vast, cerebric fungi debate philosophy and mysticism to perfect their shared understanding of the universe and to outshine the intellectual insights of the other colonies.

In an effort to prove esoteric points on behalf of their home colonies—or to spite other colonies—cerebric fungi enjoy studying creatures less intelligent than themselves. The fungi have been pleased to find suitable subjects on other planets.

Cerebric fungi greet strangers they meet with telepathic questions that might seem inane or even senseless. The fungi have difficulty comprehending the needs and concerns of non-fungoid creatures and easily distress others with experiments meant not to harm but rather to test pet theories.

With millennia of starflight and space exploration informing their culture, cerebric fungi can offer information that other civilizations would otherwise have little chance of learning. However, it often takes much time, patience, and psychic fortitude for other creatures to interpret a cerebric fungus’s insights, as elements other creatures might consider necessary context, the fungus considers obvious or irrelevant. The typical cerebric fungus is approximately 4 feet in diameter and weighs 150 pounds.

Cerebric fungi reproduce by budding. They can also grow specialized buds, removing them before they reach maturity, to produce living computers. By adjusting the timing and chemical mixture of this process, cerebric fungi can create computer modules and countermeasures that can be incorporated into any computer. Cerebric fungi sell their creations to fund further explorations. A fungal computer’s base cost is 10% higher than a normal computer and has the following traits.

: A fungal computer can synthesize its own energy from most atmospheres. This functions as a free self-charging upgrade.

: A fungal computer has a complex network and a fibrous core that can’t be reduced in size. No miniaturization upgrade can be applied to a fungal computer.

: A fungal computer has only a telepathic user interface (see the upgrade below). A hacking kit can access a fungal computer, but otherwise a typical computer with a complex control module must be purchased separately and installed to provide a digital interface for a fungal computer.

Colossal Herd Animal

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

N Colossal animal

Init.: +0 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +16

Defense

HP: 125

EAC: 20 KAC: 22

Fort: +13 Ref: +10 Will: +8

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: natural weapon +18 (3d4+16 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +8 Dex: +0 Con: +4 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +21

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or herd (3–12)

Description

From the ruthigs of Castrovel to the wollipeds of Triaxus, herd animals are beasts that gather in social groups comprised entirely of creatures of the same species. Herding behavior allows animals to gather and move together for protection from predators. Most commonly, herd animals are herbivores or docile omnivores.

better represent fiercer animals, including aggressive herbivores and omnivores that may or may not move in groups of their own kind.

In the Pact Worlds, the most common herd animals are domesticated. When various species took to exploring and colonizing the stars, they brought their livestock with them. For instance, cattle, goats, and sheep can be found on Absalom Station, as well as on any world where humans have a significant presence. Herd animals in the Pact Worlds serve a variety of purposes in the various societies that cultivate and support them. Farmers and engineers commonly maintain groups of herd animals to harvest their meat, though keeping herd animals for their shorn fur to create textiles is a more sustainable practice. Other cultivators leverage herd animals as mounts or pack animals, and training these docile creatures can result in large profits for professionals who are particularly skilled in this pursuit.

More rarely, some xenobiologists even cultivate groups of herd animals for scientists and corporations who wish to stabilize wild planets’ ecosystems. In this case, interested parties might place large numbers of pack animals in foreign locales to help tame rampant vegetation growth or provide prey for a dying species of predator. The goal of such projects is almost always to improve a planet’s suitability for colonization, mining, or farming. However, this practice is often controversial among ethnobiologists, who argue that introducing large populations of non-native species in this manner produces harmful and unforeseen results more often than it aids environments.

The herd animals in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique herd animal, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, from antlers to hooves, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts (see page 138). Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

The ruthig is a mammal with six legs, padded feet with toenails, a long and thin neck, an extended jaw with flat teeth, a lengthy and rough tongue, and two pairs of eyes. Its shaggy fur is home to a plethora of algae and moss species, giving the ruthig a mottled green color useful as camouflage in the herbivore’s native woodlands. Wild ruthigs travel in grazing herds, which are less camouflaged during the birthing season when gray-furred young are born. People of Castrovel domesticate the beasts for their honey-sweet milk and succulent meat.

A ruthig is a Medium herd animal that is about 4 feet tall at the withers and 6 feet tall with its head raised high. On average, a ruthig weighs about 250 pounds. A ruthig can use its bludgeoning kick as a natural weapon, and it has camouflage when in forested terrain.

Colossal Predator

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 13 XP: 25,600

N Colossal animal

Init.: +0 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +23

Defense

HP: 225

EAC: 27 KAC: 29

Fort: +17 Ref: +12 Will: +13

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: natural weapon +25 (3d12+21 P or S)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +8 Dex: +0 Con: +5 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +23

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or pack (3–4)

Description

From the vortex sharks of Kalo-Mahoi to the hoarbats of Verces’s Darkside, and from the dire tigers of Castrovel to the tremor worms of Akiton, predators abound in the Pact Worlds and on planets across the galaxy. What unites these disparate species is that their diets include the meat of other creatures and that they hunt and kill to acquire this food. On planets where sapient species are dominant, predators have learned that weapon-wielding creatures can be deadly prey. Other predators, deprived of such contact, often see sentient explorers as an unfamiliar form of potential sustenance, making confrontations inevitable.

Predators come in all shapes and sizes, limited only by the environment where they are found. Bigger predators rely on abundant food, cycles of inactivity, an omnivorous diet, or a combination of these. Smaller predators have fewer requirements and can be equally dangerous; even very small animals can evolve pack tactics to overwhelm larger and stronger creatures. Some of these swarms, such as the flying viper eels of Bretheda, strip flesh from bone as they move over and around prey.

The predators in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique predator, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, from claws to slams, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts. Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

The vortex shark is a slim, cartilaginous fish that lives in the depths of Kalo-Mahoi’s oceans. The creature is bioluminescent and has a four-part jaw with rows of hooked teeth. A vortex shark’s natural weapon is a bite that deals slashing damage, has the bleed 1d6 critical hit effect, and allows the shark’s teeth to grab ahold of a target. The female of the species grows larger than the male and lays eggs in pouches she leaves behind. Young fend for themselves when they hatch, catching weaker siblings for a first meal. An adult vortex shark is a Large aquatic predator, averaging 12 feet in length and 1,000 pounds in weight. The sharks can breathe only water and have a land speed of 0 feet and a swim speed of 60 feet. Living in Kalo-Mahoi’s seas has inured them to cold (resistance 5 to cold), and they have blindsense (scent) out to 30 feet and the tracking (scent) special ability for waterborne prey, which they use mostly to hunt bleeding creatures.

Colour out of Space

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 10 XP: 9,600

CN Huge ooze (incorporeal)

Init.: +8 Senses: blindsight (vibration) 120 ft. Perception: +24

Aura: lassitude (300 ft., DC 19)

Defense

HP: 140

EAC: 23 KAC: 24

Fort: +11 Ref: +11 Will: +7

Offense

Speed: fly 60 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: disintegrating touch +20 (1d10+10)

Offensive Abilities: feed

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +8 Con: +3 Wis: +3 Int: +2 Cha: +5

Skills: Acrobatics +24 (+32 to fly), Life Science +19, Physical Science +19, Stealth +24, Survival +24

Languages: Aklo (can’t speak any language)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Aura of Lassitude (Su) A creature within 300 feet of a colour out of space (even when the colour is hiding within a solid object) must succeed at a DC 19 Will save or become overwhelmed with listlessness and ennui. While under this effect, the creature takes a –4 penalty to Will saving throws and doesn’t willingly travel farther than 1 mile from the area where it failed its saving throw against that colour’s aura of lassitude. If the victim failed the saving throw while on a starship, it instead doesn’t willingly travel farther than 1 mile from the starship, nor does it willingly pilot that starship. A break enchantment spell (DC 19) ends the effect, as does moving the victim more than 1 mile from where it failed its save (or from the starship where it failed its save. Every 24 hours, a creature affected by an aura of lassitude can attempt a new DC 19 Will save to cast off the effects of the aura. A creature that succeeds at this saving throw is immune to that colour’s aura of lassitude for 24 hours. A creature under the effects of an aura of lassitude from a colour out of space can’t be further affected by this ability from other colours. This is a mind-affecting effect.

Disintegrating Touch (Su) A colour’s touch can disintegrate matter. This attack targets EAC and deals untyped damage; a creature that succeeds at a DC 19 Fortitude save takes half damage. A creature reduced to 0 Hit Points by this attack must succeed at a DC 19 Fortitude save or be immediately slain and reduced to a pile of fine ash.

Feed (Su) As a full action, a colour can attempt to feed on a living creature, a natural region of plant and animal life, or a Drift engine. If it feeds on a creature or a Drift engine, the colour must have line of sight to and be within 300 feet of the target. If it feeds on a region of plant and animal life, it needs only to be within that region. It can feed on a region once per week, a specific Drift engine once per day, and a specific living creature once per day.

Feeding on a region or a Drift engine is automatically successful. When the colour feeds on a region, it causes plant life there to grow brittle and sickly; undergrowth in a blighted region doesn’t provide concealment or function as difficult terrain, and small animals grow larger and deformed. When the colour feeds on a Drift engine, the ship becomes sluggish and awkward; all checks to maneuver the starship (including pilot actions during starship combat) take a –4 penalty, and the duration of travel through the Drift is doubled. A colour never completely consumes a region or a Drift engine. A region of nature recovers from these effects 1 year after the colour leaves the area, while a Drift engine recovers 24 hours after the colour’s feeding.

A creature can resist being fed upon by a colour out of space by succeeding at a DC 19 Will save, in which case the colour can’t attempt to feed on that creature again for 24 hours. If the victim fails this saving throw, it takes 1d4 Constitution drain and 1d4 Charisma drain. A creature whose Constitution score is drained to 0 this way immediately dies, crumbling into a mass of desiccated tissue. A creature whose Charisma score is drained to 0 this way gains the colour-blighted graft (see below).

Susceptible to Force Effects (Ex) A colour out of space takes half again as much damage (+50%) from force effects, and it takes a –4 penalty to saving throws to resist force effects. A colour out of space can’t damage targets protected by force effects with its disintegrating touch, and the aura of lassitude and feed abilities of a colour that is completely entrapped by force effects have no effect.

Description

The deepest reaches of space hold truly bizarre terrors, and few among them are more feared than the colour out of space. This entity is composed only of a malevolent hue that defies classification and eludes identification by most sensors. A colour’s presence manifests as an unsettling shifting of colors as it moves through an area. This distortion is enough to allow for targeting of a colour out of space, but the creature’s natural defenses and immunities still make it a high-risk target to engage.

A colour out of space arrives on a planet or other celestial body in embryonic form, infusing the inside of a dense meteorite. After the meteor lands, it crumbles, and the colour seeps out and begins to feed. Once it has fed sufficiently, often over many months, it launches into space again and seeks new feeding grounds. Sometimes, it leaves enough of itself behind to form a new embryonic colour, and the bizarre life cycle continues.

The energies Drift engines exude can nourish a colour out of space. Scholars are only starting to explore what this feeding implies about the nature of the Drift itself.

Comet Wasp Swarm

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 12 XP: 19,200

N Diminutive vermin (swarm)

Init.: +8 Senses: blindsight (vibration) 30 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +22

Defense

HP: 200

EAC: 26 KAC: 28

Fort: +14 Ref: +16 Will: +11

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 30 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: swarm attack (6d6 C & P plus chilling toxin)

Offensive Abilities: distraction (DC 19), implant

Statistics

Str: -2 Dex: +8 Con: +5 Wis: +0 Int:Cha: -3

Skills: Acrobatics +22 (+30 to fly)

Ecology

Environment: any vacuum

Organization: swarm, pair, or brood (3–6)

Special Abilities

Implant (Ex) A comet wasp swarm can choose not to use its swarm attack on (and deal no damage to) a helpless or paralyzed living creature in its space. Instead of doing so, the swarm implants eggs in that creature, afflicting it with comet wasp gestation.

Chilling Toxin

Type poison (injury); Save Fortitude DC 19
Track Dexterity (special); Frequency 1/round for 6 rounds
Effect progression track is Healthy—Sluggish—Stiffened— Staggered—Immobile; no end state
Cure 1 save

Comet Wasp Gestation

Type disease (injury); Save Fortitude DC 19
Track physical (special); Frequency 1/day
Effect no latent state; the victim dies on the fifth day as a new comet wasp swarm cuts itself free
Cure

Description

Even the vacuum of space has bugs. Most of these void-dwelling vermin are harmless, but some are dangerous or predatory.

Asteroid lice and planetoid beetles feed on minerals in the rock of their airless habitats. Asteroid lice are communal, but planetoid beetles are territorial, tolerating only one mate. These creatures and their eggs can float in space to a new home. However, careless quarrying and shipping have accelerated their spread through the galaxy.

Xenobiologists theorize many space vermin evolved in special circumstances. Necropedes were once centipede-like scavengers on Eox; they now have a bite that can digest undead flesh. A warpmoth is like a glowing blue-white speck attracted to moving light, such as other warpmoths or passing starships. Gathering in swarms and following ships helps the moths feed and mate. Comet wasps create nests in frozen interstellar bodies. These icy, venomous vespids lay their eggs in living creatures.

Computer Glitch Gremlin

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 200

LE Tiny fey

Init.: +2 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +4

Defense

HP: 5

EAC: 9 KAC: 10

Fort: +2 Ref: +2 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 20 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: bite +2 (1d4–1 P plus glitch module, DC 10)

Offensive Abilities: glitch module, networked technomancy

Statistics

Str: -1 Dex: +2 Con: +1 Wis: +1 Int: +3 Cha: -2

Skills: Computers +9, Engineering +4 (+9 to use computers), Stealth +9

Languages: Aklo, Common; digital telepathy 30 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: pair or infection (3–8)

Special Abilities

Digital Telepathy (Su) A computer glitch gremlin can communicate telepathically only with digital devices and with other creatures that can do so (such as other computer glitch gremlins). This allows the glitch gremlin to attempt Computers checks to access any computer within the telepathy’s range.

Glitch Module (Su) When a glitch gremlin succeeds at a Computers check to access a system or hits a foe with an attack or spell, the accessed system or one random computer held or carried by the struck creature glitches. An attended computer (including any computer on a creature hit by a computer glitch gremlin’s attack or spell) negate this effect by succeeding at a DC 10 Will save. The glitch causes one of the following effects, which functions as if the system had the indicated countermeasure (DC = 16 + the number of glitch gremlins within 30 feet when the glitch was added): a fake shell countermeasure that obstructs all users, an alarm that plays a loud and potentially embarrassing audio or holographic file when accessed by any user unless the user succeeds at a Computers check as if hacking the system, or one randomly determined countermeasure that applies even to users with root access. Disabling or removing this glitch requires a Computers check as if disabling or removing a module. A disabled glitch reactivates after 1d10 minutes if not removed. A system can have no more than one glitch per module.

Networked Technomancy (Sp) When gathered in groups, computer glitch gremlins share their magic. As long as a computer glitch gremlin is within 30 feet of another of its kind, it gains concealment thanks to erratic holograms that falteringly appear near it and emulate the appearance of surrounding objects. Groups of computer glitch goblins can also use more potent spell-like abilities; each gremlin in the group except for one takes a standard action to prepare the spell-like ability, and the final gremlin actually uses it. Two computer glitch gremlins can use implant data or logic bomb (DC 15), four can use holographic image (3rd level, DC 16) or instant virus (DC 16), and six can use destruction protocol

Description

Gremlins are fey spirits intimately tied to technological malfunctions. One variety of gremlin, called glitch gremlins, is especially common (and feared) in societies with advanced technology. Both computer glitch gremlins and ship glitch gremlins demonstrate remarkable single-mindedness in their pursuit of mayhem as they find new and more frustrating ways to make technology break, glitch, or fail.

A computer glitch gremlin’s appearance varies widely with the digital data it has eaten, but they average 1 foot in height and weigh around 4 pounds. Ship glitch gremlins have lamprey-like mouths and long, spidery arms and legs. They stand 2-1/2 feet tall and weigh approximately 20 pounds.

Corpsefolk Marine

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

NE Medium undead

Init.: +9 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +14

Defense

HP: 126

EAC: 19 KAC: 22

Fort: +9 Ref: +7 Will: +8

Offense

Speed: 30 ft. (20 ft. in armor)

Melee: LFD pulse gauntlet +14 (2d6+9 B & So; critical knockdown)

Ranged: dual acid dart rifle +17 (2d8+9 A & P; critical corrode 2d4) or frag grenade II +17 (explode [15 ft., 2d6 P, DC 15])

Offensive Abilities: fighting styles (sharpshoot), focus fire, sniper’s aim

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +5 Con:Wis: +4 Int: +0 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +19, Intimidate +14, Piloting +14

Languages: Common

Gear: elite defiance series, dual acid dart rifle with 48 darts, LFD pulse gauntlet with 2 batteries (20 charges each), frag grenades II (2)

Ecology

Environment: any (Eox)

Organization: solitary, pair, or elite squad (3–5)

Description

Bodies of the dead can, if in good enough condition, be magically made into corpsefolk: free-willed and intelligent undead who remember much of their past lives. For lone necromancers, this magic is possible only if the corpse is of the recently deceased or has been preserved shortly after death. However, the bone sages of Eox have learned to magically repair even badly damaged corpses and those decayed beyond what was usable for lesser necromancers. As a result, corpsefolk make up much of the population of Eox, some serving as indentured servants to pay off the cost of their creation. Undead creatures of this type were called zombie masters in ancient days, but as a class of normal citizens on Eox and soldiers in the Corpse Fleet, they have become known as corpsefolk, balancing their humble social status with their self-willed mentality. Corpsefolk look like zombies, but unlike those undead, corpsefolk retain memories of their previous lives, skills and abilities gained from classes and experience, and the will to make their own decisions. Initially, a corpsefolk’s physical form looks gaunt and dry, with sunken eyes and a hollow torso, but it begins as intact as its corpse was when it gained undeath.

As corpsefolk age, however, their bodies can become torn and tattered. Early in their undead years, corpsefolk use surgery and magic to adopt a more wholesome appearance, but after a few decades, most cease to care what they look like, focusing only on what they can do to increase their long-term wealth and power. Corpsefolk can benefit from cybernetic implants, though many prefer

, which blend more seamlessly with their animated forms.

Most living creatures see corpsefolk as walking corpses and as such fear or mistrust them, but other self-aware undead creatures treat corpsefolk as second-class undead. Bone sages view corpsefolk as barely better than zombies, while ghouls, vampires, and other undead treat them as peasants or wage slaves unworthy of respect. Because most corpsefolk exist as a result of being created specifically to serve, few enter their undead existence with wealth, power, or influence. Most corpsefolk also lack innate magic power or special abilities. Though they can learn and excel with time and practice, doing so is no easier for them than for living creatures. This fact, coupled with the prejudices they face, makes it difficult for corpsefolk to rise into important positions. Eox, for instance, has a vast corpsefolk underclass, and these ragged undead are rarely selected for any position calling for interaction with living citizens of the Pact Worlds.

Corpsefolk can be found in various roles in those societies that accept them: managers, soldiers, technicians, and workers. They can use equipment they mastered in life and gain new skills, though they vary in their ambition. Some corpsefolk lack the drive to do more than the minimum needed to maintain their existence, which is very little. Unlike undead that must consume materials from the living or those that hate the living and wish to destroy them, corpsefolk have no supernatural hunger or drive to kill. They don’t need air, food, sleep, or water, and the more apathetic corpsefolk also don’t need stimuli—when left alone, they can sit in silence for weeks or years with no sense of boredom or unease. Such corpsefolk carry out the tasks assigned to them and do little else.

Most corpsefolk, however, still experience emotions and desires, though they have duller passions than most of the living and take a long-term view. Even when tending to menial tasks, they assume their current positions are temporary, trusting that as time passes and their experience grows, they can at least improve their lot even if positions of power and influence are out of reach.

Some corpsefolk have great ambition. These drives can be tied to some aspect of a corpsefolk’s original life or an activity experienced early in their undeath that sparks significant interest. Such corpsefolk might settle old scores from their life, become fascinated with a specific kind of art, eagerly embrace new skills and opportunities, explore situations they feared in life, or seek to excel at assigned tasks as a way to track their progress through a potentially eternal unlife.

Corpsefolk Operative

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 3 XP: 800

NE Medium undead

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +14

Defense

HP: 42

EAC: 14 KAC: 15

Fort: +3 Ref: +6 Will: +7

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: survival knife +7 (1d4+4 S)

Ranged: static arc pistol +9 (1d6+3 E; critical arc 2) or tactical shirren-eye rifle +9 (1d10+3 P)

Offensive Abilities: trick attack +1d8

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +4 Con:Wis: +2 Int: +1 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +9, Intimidate +9, Sleight of Hand +14, Stealth +14

Languages: Common

Gear: graphite carbon skin, static arc pistol with 2 batteries (20 charges each), survival knife, tactical shirren-eye rifle with 25 sniper rounds

Ecology

Environment: any (Eox)

Organization: solitary, pair, or association (3–10)

Description

Bodies of the dead can, if in good enough condition, be magically made into corpsefolk: free-willed and intelligent undead who remember much of their past lives. For lone necromancers, this magic is possible only if the corpse is of the recently deceased or has been preserved shortly after death. However, the bone sages of Eox have learned to magically repair even badly damaged corpses and those decayed beyond what was usable for lesser necromancers. As a result, corpsefolk make up much of the population of Eox, some serving as indentured servants to pay off the cost of their creation. Undead creatures of this type were called zombie masters in ancient days, but as a class of normal citizens on Eox and soldiers in the Corpse Fleet, they have become known as corpsefolk, balancing their humble social status with their self-willed mentality. Corpsefolk look like zombies, but unlike those undead, corpsefolk retain memories of their previous lives, skills and abilities gained from classes and experience, and the will to make their own decisions. Initially, a corpsefolk’s physical form looks gaunt and dry, with sunken eyes and a hollow torso, but it begins as intact as its corpse was when it gained undeath.

As corpsefolk age, however, their bodies can become torn and tattered. Early in their undead years, corpsefolk use surgery and magic to adopt a more wholesome appearance, but after a few decades, most cease to care what they look like, focusing only on what they can do to increase their long-term wealth and power. Corpsefolk can benefit from cybernetic implants, though many prefer

, which blend more seamlessly with their animated forms.

Most living creatures see corpsefolk as walking corpses and as such fear or mistrust them, but other self-aware undead creatures treat corpsefolk as second-class undead. Bone sages view corpsefolk as barely better than zombies, while ghouls, vampires, and other undead treat them as peasants or wage slaves unworthy of respect. Because most corpsefolk exist as a result of being created specifically to serve, few enter their undead existence with wealth, power, or influence. Most corpsefolk also lack innate magic power or special abilities. Though they can learn and excel with time and practice, doing so is no easier for them than for living creatures. This fact, coupled with the prejudices they face, makes it difficult for corpsefolk to rise into important positions. Eox, for instance, has a vast corpsefolk underclass, and these ragged undead are rarely selected for any position calling for interaction with living citizens of the Pact Worlds.

Corpsefolk can be found in various roles in those societies that accept them: managers, soldiers, technicians, and workers. They can use equipment they mastered in life and gain new skills, though they vary in their ambition. Some corpsefolk lack the drive to do more than the minimum needed to maintain their existence, which is very little. Unlike undead that must consume materials from the living or those that hate the living and wish to destroy them, corpsefolk have no supernatural hunger or drive to kill. They don’t need air, food, sleep, or water, and the more apathetic corpsefolk also don’t need stimuli—when left alone, they can sit in silence for weeks or years with no sense of boredom or unease. Such corpsefolk carry out the tasks assigned to them and do little else.

Most corpsefolk, however, still experience emotions and desires, though they have duller passions than most of the living and take a long-term view. Even when tending to menial tasks, they assume their current positions are temporary, trusting that as time passes and their experience grows, they can at least improve their lot even if positions of power and influence are out of reach.

Some corpsefolk have great ambition. These drives can be tied to some aspect of a corpsefolk’s original life or an activity experienced early in their undeath that sparks significant interest. Such corpsefolk might settle old scores from their life, become fascinated with a specific kind of art, eagerly embrace new skills and opportunities, explore situations they feared in life, or seek to excel at assigned tasks as a way to track their progress through a potentially eternal unlife.

Damai Guardian

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 12 XP: 19,200

N Medium humanoid (damai)

Init.: +1 Senses: greater emotionsense, low-light vision Perception: +27

Defense

HP: 170 RP: 5

EAC: 25 KAC: 26

Fort: +11 Ref: +11 Will: +17

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: ultrathin dueling sword +21 (3d6+16 E & F)

Ranged: paragon semi-auto pistol +19 (4d6+12 P)

Offensive Abilities:

Spells Known: Known

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +1 Con: +5 Wis: +8 Int: +2 Cha: +4

Skills: Diplomacy +22, Mysticism +27, Sense Motive +27

Languages: Ancient Daimalkan, Common, Daimalkan

Gear: estex suit IV, paragon semi-auto pistol with 32 small arm rounds, ultrathin dueling sword

Ecology

Environment: any (Daimalko)

Organization: solitary, pair, or adjudication (3–7)

Special Abilities

Empathic Bond (Su) Damai Guardians have an empathic connection with each other that lasts for life. If a Guardian spends 1 round concentrating while thinking about another specific Guardian, she can learn that individual’s relative position and general condition, as per the status spell. Additionally, when she uses this ability, the Guardian learns the other individual’s general emotional state and its intensity, such as whether the target is mildly content, moderately worried, intensely distraught, or similar.

Scrappy (Ex) Generations of living together in underground shelters and under the constant threat of enormous creatures have taught damais to work together against all odds. Once per day, as long as an ally is within 10 feet, a damai can reroll a failed attack roll or saving throw.

Description

The people known throughout the galaxy as damais are survivors of a shattered planet who are at once hardy yet fragile, savvy yet foolish, prescient yet solipsistic. Their planet is ancient even on the scale of the vast universe, and yet for damais, modern history is merely 200 years old. Life on Daimalko, their dry, rocky planet in Near Space, transformed when an event called the Awakening wracked the land with earthquakes, evaporated the world’s oceans, and withered its greenery. Worse, the cataclysm awakened the terrible colossi at the heart of the people’s legends. Some of these monstrosities were

, though many were other, equally horrific beasts, and all rose from their slumber beneath the seabed to destroy most of the planet’s inhabitants in short order.

Prior to this disaster, the people of Daimalko were split between two advanced, warring societies: the holy Queendom of Ykarth, which claimed a divine mandate from the empyreal lord Duellona, and the psychic Confederation of Volkaria. But the Awakening drove most of the surviving damais underground, regardless of their allegiance, where they huddled in caverns they came to collectively call the Refuge. Nearly 150 years passed as the remaining damais and their descendants grappled with the cultural trauma of the Awakening. Originally a fragile people threaded with natural ribbons of psychic energy, empathic magic, or braids of both, damais adapted into the hardy and resourceful people they are today.

About 50 years ago, a wise leader in one of the deepest and largest pockets of the Refuge resolved to reunite damais for good. Reirali Kokolu sought to build solidarity among the refugees despite the fact that the colossi still rampaged on the surface above. At great personal risk, she traversed the lightless caverns to make contact with other refugee settlements, inviting their leaders to travel with her until they’d contacted each surviving damai and formulated a plan to keep them connected to one another, even if only spiritually.

Near the end of the leaders’ journey, they stumbled upon a curious cache of rune-scribed orbs. Though most of the leaders thought the objects mere baubles, useless remnants of the planet’s lost civilizations, Reirali Kokolu felt compelled to commune with the orbs. At first, touching them conveyed blasts of overwhelming emotion, fits of magical hubris, unnatural physical strength, and the darkest dread. However, after studying them at length—and convincing the other damai leaders to do the same—Kokolu found that the orbs, when bonded to a user, subtly conveyed vital information about the marauding colossi, such as their physical locations at any given time. Users of these orbs even seemed able to subtly influence the beasts’ behavior, though doing so caused tremendous stress, both mentally and physically. Communing with the orbs also fused the leaders to each other emotionally. As they learned to wield the orbs’ power, the leaders came to realize that with just a little concentration, they could inhabit each others’ minds and hearts.

These damai leaders became the first Guardians. Invigorated with the powers they’d unlocked, the Guardians returned to their respective settlements in the Refuge. Some died mysteriously along the way, and to this day it is unclear why, despite numerous attempts to discover the fates of these Guardians and any motive or meaning behind their deaths.

However, the rest returned to their enclaves. While some used the orbs merely to fortify their settlements, terrified of the power of the colossi they felt through their artifacts, other Guardians began ushering small colonies of damais aboveground, carefully using their bonded orbs to shield their people from harm. Now, the underground settlements have approached a stability that is just shy of thriving, though the aboveground colonies still struggle, thanks both to their youth and to colossi attacks that their Guardians have failed to thwart. Daimalkan Guardians command great power, found both within them and through their orbs, but they are no less mortal than their kin, who age much as humans do. Thus, each Guardian carefully chooses and trains her successor over about a dozen years, using her wits, her wisdom, and her bonded orb, which she transfers to her charge when the time is right.

Though some whisper that the magic flowing through the leaders is somehow tied to the force that sparked the Awakening, trust in the Guardians is nearly universal in damai settlements. Despite their different approaches to survival, the Guardians and everyday damais recognize how deeply tied to each other they are—or without the bonds of their people, damais would have nothing except the colossi that slaver for their end.

The average damai has gray skin, stands 6 feet tall, and weighs around 175 pounds.

Damai

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 200

N Medium humanoid (damai)

Init.: +3 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +9

Defense

HP: 12

EAC: 10 KAC: 11

Fort: +0 Ref: +2 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: survival knife +4 (1d4 S)

Ranged: tactical semi-auto pistol +2 (1d6 P)

Offensive Abilities:

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +3 Con: +1 Wis: +0 Int: +1 Cha: +2

Skills: Engineering +4, Medicine +9, Stealth +9, Survival +4

Languages: Common, Daimalkan

Gear: estex suit I, survival knife, tactical semiauto pistol with 18 small arm rounds, 6 field rations

Ecology

Environment: any (Daimalko)

Organization: solitary, pair, trio, or colony (10–350)

Special Abilities

Scrappy (Ex) Generations of living together in underground shelters and under the constant threat of enormous creatures have taught damais to work together against all odds. Once per day, as long as an ally is within 10 feet, a damai can reroll a failed attack roll or saving throw.

Description

The people known throughout the galaxy as damais are survivors of a shattered planet who are at once hardy yet fragile, savvy yet foolish, prescient yet solipsistic. Their planet is ancient even on the scale of the vast universe, and yet for damais, modern history is merely 200 years old. Life on Daimalko, their dry, rocky planet in Near Space, transformed when an event called the Awakening wracked the land with earthquakes, evaporated the world’s oceans, and withered its greenery. Worse, the cataclysm awakened the terrible colossi at the heart of the people’s legends. Some of these monstrosities were

, though many were other, equally horrific beasts, and all rose from their slumber beneath the seabed to destroy most of the planet’s inhabitants in short order.

Prior to this disaster, the people of Daimalko were split between two advanced, warring societies: the holy Queendom of Ykarth, which claimed a divine mandate from the empyreal lord Duellona, and the psychic Confederation of Volkaria. But the Awakening drove most of the surviving damais underground, regardless of their allegiance, where they huddled in caverns they came to collectively call the Refuge. Nearly 150 years passed as the remaining damais and their descendants grappled with the cultural trauma of the Awakening. Originally a fragile people threaded with natural ribbons of psychic energy, empathic magic, or braids of both, damais adapted into the hardy and resourceful people they are today.

About 50 years ago, a wise leader in one of the deepest and largest pockets of the Refuge resolved to reunite damais for good. Reirali Kokolu sought to build solidarity among the refugees despite the fact that the colossi still rampaged on the surface above. At great personal risk, she traversed the lightless caverns to make contact with other refugee settlements, inviting their leaders to travel with her until they’d contacted each surviving damai and formulated a plan to keep them connected to one another, even if only spiritually.

Near the end of the leaders’ journey, they stumbled upon a curious cache of rune-scribed orbs. Though most of the leaders thought the objects mere baubles, useless remnants of the planet’s lost civilizations, Reirali Kokolu felt compelled to commune with the orbs. At first, touching them conveyed blasts of overwhelming emotion, fits of magical hubris, unnatural physical strength, and the darkest dread. However, after studying them at length—and convincing the other damai leaders to do the same—Kokolu found that the orbs, when bonded to a user, subtly conveyed vital information about the marauding colossi, such as their physical locations at any given time. Users of these orbs even seemed able to subtly influence the beasts’ behavior, though doing so caused tremendous stress, both mentally and physically. Communing with the orbs also fused the leaders to each other emotionally. As they learned to wield the orbs’ power, the leaders came to realize that with just a little concentration, they could inhabit each others’ minds and hearts.

These damai leaders became the first Guardians. Invigorated with the powers they’d unlocked, the Guardians returned to their respective settlements in the Refuge. Some died mysteriously along the way, and to this day it is unclear why, despite numerous attempts to discover the fates of these Guardians and any motive or meaning behind their deaths.

However, the rest returned to their enclaves. While some used the orbs merely to fortify their settlements, terrified of the power of the colossi they felt through their artifacts, other Guardians began ushering small colonies of damais aboveground, carefully using their bonded orbs to shield their people from harm. Now, the underground settlements have approached a stability that is just shy of thriving, though the aboveground colonies still struggle, thanks both to their youth and to colossi attacks that their Guardians have failed to thwart. Daimalkan Guardians command great power, found both within them and through their orbs, but they are no less mortal than their kin, who age much as humans do. Thus, each Guardian carefully chooses and trains her successor over about a dozen years, using her wits, her wisdom, and her bonded orb, which she transfers to her charge when the time is right.

Though some whisper that the magic flowing through the leaders is somehow tied to the force that sparked the Awakening, trust in the Guardians is nearly universal in damai settlements. Despite their different approaches to survival, the Guardians and everyday damais recognize how deeply tied to each other they are—or without the bonds of their people, damais would have nothing except the colossi that slaver for their end.

The average damai has gray skin, stands 6 feet tall, and weighs around 175 pounds.

Dreamer

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

N Large aberration

Init.: +1 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +16

Defense

HP: 105 RP: 4

EAC: 19 KAC: 20

Fort: +7 Ref: +7 Will: +13

Offense

Speed: fly 30 ft. (Ex, average)

Melee: tentacle +15 (1d12+12 A & B plus synesthesia)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +1 Con: +0 Wis: +6 Int: -2 Cha: +2

Skills: Acrobatics +16, Mysticism +21

Languages: Brethedan; telepathy 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any sky (Liavara)

Organization: solitary, pair, or flotilla (3–5)

Special Abilities

Atavistic Fury (Ex) When a Dreamer is reduced to fewer than half its total Hit Points, it angrily awakens from its normal somnambulant state with a roar of psychic fury, at which point each non-Dreamer creature within 30 feet must succeed at a DC 18 Will save or become shaken for 2d4 rounds. This is a mind-affecting effect.

While it remains in its atavistic fury, the Dreamer gains a +2 bonus to melee attack and damage rolls and saving throws, and the save DC for its synesthesia ability increases by 2. While in this state of atavistic fury, a Dreamer cannot use its spell-like abilities. This state lasts for 1 minute, after which the Dreamer is fatigued for 1 hour.

Lulling Thoughts (Su) A Dreamer’s mind echoes with songs drawn from a planet’s fundamental vibrations, causing any creature that attempts to read its thoughts or use a mind-control or telepathic effect against it to become fascinated for 1d4+1 rounds (Will DC 18 negates). This is a mind-affecting effect.

Synesthesia (Su) When a Dreamer hits with its tentacle attack, it exposes its target to a focused blast of sensory overstimulation. The target can attempt a DC 18 Will save to negate the effect; if successful, it is off-target for 1 round. On a failed save, the target’s overloaded senses interfere with one another, such that sound is perceived as a swath of color, smells register as various sounds, and so on. The affected creature’s speeds are halved, and it takes a –4 penalty to AC, attack rolls, Reflex saves, and skill checks. These effects last for 1d4 rounds, and further applications of this ability increase the duration. This is a mind-affecting effect.

Description

Long before the Gap, the barathus of the gas giant Bretheda were sailing the stars within the enormous spacefaring creatures known as oma. One of their first destinations within the star system was their nearest neighbor, the peach-colored gas giant known as Liavara, and these pioneering barathus found the placid skies much to their liking. But something within Liavara’s composition affected the visiting barathus deeply, and the wheeling and trilling so common to the species took on a new and unique psychic significance. Over an astonishingly short span of time, at least on an evolutionary scale, these barathus underwent profound mental and physical changes. Their abilities to adapt and merge dwindled and ultimately vanished, and their intellect diminished even as their psychic prowess burgeoned. The Dreamers became psychically sensitive in ways their barathu progenitors could have never predicted.

By the time the second oma-ship of barathus arrived in Liavara’s skies, the first arrivals had become markedly different from the entities they once were: nearly feral, silent save for their crooning songs, seemingly oblivious to their surroundings, and yet commanding unparalleled powers of divination. Rather than renouncing their wayward kin, the barathus embraced them, calling them “Dreamers” due to their somnambulant behavior. Ever since, barathus have regarded their Dreamer cousins with a mix of reverence and protectiveness, an attitude that ultimately led to the barathus’ insistence upon administering Liavara as a protectorate within the Pact Worlds. This political status persists to this day, as the barathus continue to do everything in their power to protect the Dreamers.

Whether the Dreamers recognize or understand their progenitors’ attitudes toward them is unknown. Left to their own among Liavara’s gentle clouds, the Dreamers wheel and dance through the skies, mewling incomprehensible songs that nevertheless carry profound psychic power. While ancient pre-Gap records indicate that the Dreamers’ songs once predicted future events with unerring accuracy, their predictions are now less precise— though no less portentous. Even those who make only a passing study of Dreamers’ songs realize that the creatures continue to prophecy some monumental event to come; the lack of detail, however, leaves open questions of the nature of the event, its timing, and whether it will be for good or ill. Some more pessimistic denizens of the Pact Worlds grumble that the Dreamers simply babble nonsense with no real clairvoyance to support their claims. These naysayers are in the minority, though—most Pact Worlders believe and wildly speculate what significant future event the Dreamers might have sensed.

Dreamers pay little heed to their surroundings and other creatures. Even Dreamers within a single flotilla seem to ignore one another, though their flights through Liavara’s clouds weave complex but seemingly instinctive patterns. Those creatures that come to Liavara as supplicants to the Dreamers gain no special treatment; the fact that some such petitioners eventually manifest psychic abilities may simply be a result of exposure to the same phenomenon that converted the Dreamers into what they now are. Nonetheless, this occasional happening has earned the Dreamers a reputation among some in the Pact Worlds as the bestowers of psychic sensitivity, and increasing numbers of pilgrims have visited Liavara in recent years to search for these peaceful, floating sages.

A Dreamer’s defenses are almost entirely autonomic, but when seriously injured, a Dreamer erupts into a furious rage with a debilitating psychic blast. Shortly after such an outburst, however, the Dreamer slips back into its dreamlike trance as if nothing out of the ordinary had happened. Even so, the creatures’ barathu protectors are likely to arrest anyone they find harassing a Dreamer and sentence them to one of Bretheda’s prison moons. Barathus are eminently protective over the Dreamers, as their existence is both an artifact of both their home world and their culture.

Dromaeosaurid

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 3 XP: 800

N Medium animal

Init.: +3 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +8

Defense

HP: 45

EAC: 13 KAC: 15

Fort: +6 Ref: +7 Will: +2

Offense

Speed: 50 ft.

Melee: talons +11 (1d6+5 S; critical bleed 1d6) or bite +11 (1d6+5 P)

Offensive Abilities: pounce

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +3 Con: +1 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +8, Stealth +13

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or pack (3–12)

Special Abilities

Pounce (Ex)

Description

The term “dinosaur” refers to a category of reptilelike fauna associated with a planet’s prehistoric evolutionary scale. Dinosaurs vary in size, although many are quite large, and they come in a variety of forms. A ceratopsid is a quadruped that has bony frills extending from its head back over its shoulders, as well as horns that adorn its face; one example is the herbivorous triceratops. Dromaeosaurids are bipedal, feathered carnivores, like the pack-hunting deinonychus (also called a raptor). Plesiosaurs are marine reptiles with long necks and toothy mouths that dwell and hunt near the water’s surface. Pterosaurs are flying reptilian beasts with membranous wings and long, sharp, triangular beaks. Sauropods are immense, lumbering quadrupeds with long necks and tails and towering stature, such as brachiosaurus and diplodocus. Theropods are bipedal dinosaurs, generally carnivorous, with fearsome, fanged jaws and clawed digits, like the tyrannosaurus. Thyreophorans are quadrupedal dinosaurs with armor-plated backs and tails weaponized with bludgeoning bone or piercing spikes, including the ankylosaurus and the stegosaurus.

The dinosaurs in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique dinosaur, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts. Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

Dust Manta Monarch

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 12 XP: 19,200

N Huge magical (beast)

Init.: +8 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision, sense through (vision [sand only]) Perception: +22

Aura: sandstorm (120 ft., DC 19)

Defense

HP: 200

EAC: 26 KAC: 28

Fort: +16 Ref: +16 Will: +11

Offense

Speed: 15 ft., burrow 80 ft.

Melee: stinger +26 (6d4+17 P plus greater dust manta toxin)

Offensive Abilities: burrowing assault

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +8 Con: +4 Wis: +3 Int: +0 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +22, Athletics +22, Stealth +27

Ecology

Environment: warm deserts

Organization: solitary, pair, or fever (1 dust manta monarch plus 3–8 dust mantas)

Special Abilities

Burrowing Assault (Ex) A dust manta monarch that takes the charge action using its burrow speed can make a full attack at the end of its movement instead of a single melee attack. It doesn’t take the normal charge penalties to its attack rolls or its AC, and its targets must succeed at a DC 19 Perception check or they are flat-footed against the attacks.

Enhanced Desert Hide (Ex) A dust manta monarch has a tougher hide than that of a typical dust manta, granting it DR 10/— and resistance to fire 10. In addition, if a dust manta monarch is at least halfway buried in sand or any fine, similarly colored substance, it can attempt a Stealth check to hide as if it had cover or concealment.

Sandstorm Aura (Su) A dust manta monarch kicks up a magical localized sandstorm that provides concealment to anyone in a 120-foot-radius area around the dust manta monarch. The sandstorm also produces severe wind, imposing a –4 penalty to attack rolls with kinetic ranged weapons. Any creature in the area without environmental protections must hold its breath or risk suffocation. Dust mantas and dust manta monarchs are immune to this effect, and their sense through ability allows them to ignore concealment caused by the sandstorm.

Greater Dust Manta Toxin

Type poison (injury); Save Fortitude DC 19
Track Strength; Frequency 1/round for 6 rounds
Effect At the dead state, the victim’s body disintegrates into dust. A creature that dies as a result of greater dust manta toxin can only be brought back to life by spells such as miracle, wish, or another similarly powerful effect.
Cure

Description

On desert worlds throughout the galaxy, strange, ray-like creatures make their home in sand flats and dunes, moving through the terrain as if through liquid. On the tidally locked Verces in the Pact Worlds, these terrors are known as dust mantas, and they reside in the eternal sunlight of the planet’s Fullbright hemisphere. Those who observe dust mantas from afar might presume them to be peaceful creatures with an idyllic life, but scientists and adventurers who approach them without knowledge of their brutal ways often find this to be the last mistake they ever make.

Dust mantas closely resemble giant versions of common rays, with a beige coloration that allows them to blend in to their sandy surroundings and a nasty-looking tail capable of injecting a horrific toxin. Dust mantas burrow through sand as easily as their aquatic counterparts glide through water, which allows them to quickly close the distance to their prey. They attack with their stingers, injecting a dangerous toxin that quickly breaks the victim’s body down to dust; dust mantas are filter feeders, and they rely on this toxin to disintegrate food sources into filterable particles. To dust mantas, dissolving prey in this way is not cruel, but simply a matter of everyday survival. In Fullbright, dust mantas gravitate toward areas in which they can find prey, most notably the Outcast Peaks and the shirren colonies in the Temora Desert. Dust mantas are also known to frequent the Oasis Temples scattered across the desert, awaiting travelers who seek those lush and verdant anomalies.

The average dust manta stretches 10 feet across and weighs 1 ton.

On rare occasions, a dust manta can develop into the larger and more ferocious dust manta monarch. These enormous rays have three tails that allow them to inflict massive damage, as well as a more potent toxin when they deliver their deadly stings. Dust manta monarchs can create localized dust storms that choke and blind those creatures unlucky enough to be caught within, making it easier for the dust manta monarch and any accompanying dust mantas to ambush their unfortunate prey. When food is scarce, a single monarch might roam the desert with a pack of smaller dust mantas, scaring up enough prey to feed the whole fever.

The typical dust manta monarch stretches 20 feet across and weighs 8 tons.

In Fullbright, some brave-or perhaps foolish-game hunters in the Outlaw Kingdoms pursue dust mantas for their desertadapted hides, despite the inherent danger in doing so. Those fortunate enough to survive their hunts craft suits of

from the hides, using nanocarbon filaments to stitch the armor together.

Dust Manta

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

N Large magical (beast)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision, sense through (vision [sand only]) Perception: +13

Defense

HP: 90

EAC: 18 KAC: 20

Fort: +10 Ref: +10 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 15 ft., burrow 80 ft.

Melee: stinger +17 (1d8+9 P plus dust manta toxin)

Offensive Abilities: burrowing charge, sand spit

Statistics

Str: +3 Dex: +5 Con: +2 Wis: +1 Int: -1 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +13, Athletics +13, Stealth +18

Ecology

Environment: warm deserts

Organization: solitary, pair, pod (3–8), or fever (3–8 dust mantas plus 1 dust manta monarch)

Special Abilities

Burrowing Charge (Ex) A dust manta can leap into action at breathtaking speed. A dust manta that takes the charge action using its burrow speed doesn’t take the normal charge penalties to its attack roll or its AC, and its target must succeed at a DC 14 Perception check or the target is flat-footed against the attack.

Desert Hide (Ex) A dust manta’s tough, sand-colored hide protects it against the dangers of the desert, granting it DR 5/— and resistance to fire 5. In addition, if a dust manta is at least halfway buried in sand or any fine, similarly colored substance, it can attempt a Stealth check to hide as if it had cover or concealment.

Sand Spit (Ex) As a standard action, a dust manta can spew sand at its foes in a 30-foot cone. Each creature in the area must succeed at a DC 14 Reflex save or become blinded for 1 round.

Dust Manta Toxin

Type poison (injury); Save Fortitude DC 14
Track Strength; Frequency 1/round for 6 rounds
Effect At the dead state, the victim’s body disintegrates into dust. A creature that dies as a result of dust manta toxin can only be brought back to life by spells such as miracle, wish, or another similarly powerful effect.
Cure

Description

On desert worlds throughout the galaxy, strange, ray-like creatures make their home in sand flats and dunes, moving through the terrain as if through liquid. On the tidally locked Verces in the Pact Worlds, these terrors are known as dust mantas, and they reside in the eternal sunlight of the planet’s Fullbright hemisphere. Those who observe dust mantas from afar might presume them to be peaceful creatures with an idyllic life, but scientists and adventurers who approach them without knowledge of their brutal ways often find this to be the last mistake they ever make.

Dust mantas closely resemble giant versions of common rays, with a beige coloration that allows them to blend in to their sandy surroundings and a nasty-looking tail capable of injecting a horrific toxin. Dust mantas burrow through sand as easily as their aquatic counterparts glide through water, which allows them to quickly close the distance to their prey. They attack with their stingers, injecting a dangerous toxin that quickly breaks the victim’s body down to dust; dust mantas are filter feeders, and they rely on this toxin to disintegrate food sources into filterable particles. To dust mantas, dissolving prey in this way is not cruel, but simply a matter of everyday survival. In Fullbright, dust mantas gravitate toward areas in which they can find prey, most notably the Outcast Peaks and the shirren colonies in the Temora Desert. Dust mantas are also known to frequent the Oasis Temples scattered across the desert, awaiting travelers who seek those lush and verdant anomalies.

The average dust manta stretches 10 feet across and weighs 1 ton.

On rare occasions, a dust manta can develop into the larger and more ferocious dust manta monarch. These enormous rays have three tails that allow them to inflict massive damage, as well as a more potent toxin when they deliver their deadly stings. Dust manta monarchs can create localized dust storms that choke and blind those creatures unlucky enough to be caught within, making it easier for the dust manta monarch and any accompanying dust mantas to ambush their unfortunate prey. When food is scarce, a single monarch might roam the desert with a pack of smaller dust mantas, scaring up enough prey to feed the whole fever.

The typical dust manta monarch stretches 20 feet across and weighs 8 tons.

In Fullbright, some brave-or perhaps foolish-game hunters in the Outlaw Kingdoms pursue dust mantas for their desertadapted hides, despite the inherent danger in doing so. Those fortunate enough to survive their hunts craft suits of

from the hides, using nanocarbon filaments to stitch the armor together.

Embri Speaker

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 10 XP: 9,600

LE Medium aberration

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +19

Defense

HP: 140 RP: 5

EAC: 22 KAC: 23

Fort: +9 Ref: +9 Will: +15, +2 vs. enchantment

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: claw +16 (2d8+10 S) or buzzblade dueling sword +16 (2d6+10 S)

Ranged: aphelion laser pistol +18 (3d4+10 F; critical burn 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: echoes of obedience, greater forced amity (DC 21), inexplicable commands

Spells Known: Known

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +0 Con: +3 Wis: +8 Int: +0 Cha: +5

Skills: Diplomacy +19, Intimidate +24, Mysticism +24, Sense Motive +24

Languages: Common, Embri, Infernal

Gear: platinum AbadarCorp travel suit, aphelion laser pistol with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each), buzzblade dueling sword with 1 battery (20 charges), hivemask

Ecology

Environment: any (Embroi)

Organization: solitary or coterie (1 plus 4–15 embri)

Special Abilities

Masked Emotions (Ex) An embri loses its immunity to charm effects and its +2 racial bonus to saving throws against enchantment spells and effects when it isn’t wearing a mask over its face. In addition, while unmasked, it must roll twice for any Sense Motive check it attempts and take the lower result.

Description

The embri are highly evolved mollusks with an exceptionally rigid social order. Every embri knows its place among the hierarchy of embri society and performs the duties of its station without complaint. The society’s few rebels or free thinkers, when discovered, are exiled or executed. This rigid order has allowed embri society to excel in technological and magical development, although outsiders view embri creations as soulless or downright gruesome— their vast, fiery factory-forges ring with the rhythmic clang of machinery, and blood-fueled vermicular vessels heave across their world with peristaltic contractions.

Embri evolved from aquatic ancestors long ago, and their four strong limbs have sharp claws at the end allowing them to walk upright on land. These claws have significant flexibility, so embri can use tools and weapons. The average embri is 4 feet tall with a trailing tail that’s slightly longer, and most weigh around 200 pounds. Embri reproduce asexually, and while they once would bud young based on the seasons of their home world, budding is now rigidly controlled by embri bureaucracy and allowed only on schedules set by the office of the spawning administrator. Young embri are raised in institutional academies where they’re trained to be diligent and compliant and are rewarded for informing on classmates who demonstrate deviant thinking or “anomalous independence.”

Embri have a highly developed brain-sac at the top of their heads, and their faces consist of two small, closely set eyes above a slit that functions as a combination of nose and ears— they exhale from this orifice to produce a whistling speech. Embri mouths are used solely for eating and are tucked away on the underside of their bodies. Embri consider eating a private, embarrassing function, and they are repulsed at how openly and communally other races eat.

Culturally, embri long ago mastered social conditioning to eliminate all displays of emotion; they consider expressiveness to be barbaric, and the occasional embri who shows feelings openly is considered primitive and dangerous. As a side effect of keeping their own feelings in check, embri easily pick up on signs of emotions. To prevent inadvertent displays of emotion, embri wear ornate masks. These masks also denote social standing, civic responsibilities, and other designators that allow embri to immediately assess one another by sight. Embri wear their masks at all times, even when sleeping, and to be without a mask is a profound embarrassment—it evidences a gross exposure of an embri’s thoughts and feelings, rendering it unable to effectively protect its own emotions and too distracted to effectively read the expressions of others.

Few embri realize their rigid social hierarchy is controlled by the forces of Hell—scheming devils direct all embri activities from the secret tunnels beneath the mollusks’ home world. These dictates are conveyed by the small group of embri, known as Speakers, who communicate with the devils directly and enact their infernal designs. In exchange for this service, Speakers are granted magical powers and the secrets of diabolical manipulation. Some Speakers also serve as diplomats and envoys from the embri to the Pact Worlds. In these roles, they both shield their people from dangerously individualistic thinking and extend their masters’ designs to the rest of the galaxy. Speakers usually travel with a coterie of devoted embri servants who, in their uniquely expressionless way, idolize the Speaker as a celebrity.

The diabolic taint on embri society is pervasive, yet subtle. For example, the embri language now contains several Infernal words and phrases, and though embri shun symbols of deific obedience as an overemotional expression of connection to the divine, stylized iconography of infernal origin features prominently in modern embri architecture.

Many embri work hard to afford masks with magical abilities. In addition to the ordinary functions of displaying social status and shielding an embri’s emotions, these masks provide additional abilities to embri wearing them. One of the most common of these masks is the

.

Embri

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 3 XP: 800

LE Medium aberration

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +8

Defense

HP: 35

EAC: 14 KAC: 15

Fort: +2 Ref: +2 Will: +8, +2 vs. enchantment

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: claw +7 (1d4+5 S)

Ranged: tactical crossbolter +9 (1d10 P)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +0 Con: +4 Wis: +0 Int: +1 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +13, Computers +13, Engineering +8, Sense Motive +13, Stealth +8

Languages: Common, Embri

Gear: tactical crossbolter with 10 arrows, hivemask

Ecology

Environment: any (Embroi)

Organization: solitary, unit (2–10), or coterie (4–15 plus 1 embri Speaker)

Special Abilities

Masked Emotions (Ex) An embri loses its immunity to charm effects and its +2 racial bonus to saving throws against enchantment spells and effects when it isn’t wearing a mask over its face. In addition, while unmasked, it must roll twice for any Sense Motive check it attempts and take the lower result.

Description

The embri are highly evolved mollusks with an exceptionally rigid social order. Every embri knows its place among the hierarchy of embri society and performs the duties of its station without complaint. The society’s few rebels or free thinkers, when discovered, are exiled or executed. This rigid order has allowed embri society to excel in technological and magical development, although outsiders view embri creations as soulless or downright gruesome— their vast, fiery factory-forges ring with the rhythmic clang of machinery, and blood-fueled vermicular vessels heave across their world with peristaltic contractions.

Embri evolved from aquatic ancestors long ago, and their four strong limbs have sharp claws at the end allowing them to walk upright on land. These claws have significant flexibility, so embri can use tools and weapons. The average embri is 4 feet tall with a trailing tail that’s slightly longer, and most weigh around 200 pounds. Embri reproduce asexually, and while they once would bud young based on the seasons of their home world, budding is now rigidly controlled by embri bureaucracy and allowed only on schedules set by the office of the spawning administrator. Young embri are raised in institutional academies where they’re trained to be diligent and compliant and are rewarded for informing on classmates who demonstrate deviant thinking or “anomalous independence.”

Embri have a highly developed brain-sac at the top of their heads, and their faces consist of two small, closely set eyes above a slit that functions as a combination of nose and ears— they exhale from this orifice to produce a whistling speech. Embri mouths are used solely for eating and are tucked away on the underside of their bodies. Embri consider eating a private, embarrassing function, and they are repulsed at how openly and communally other races eat.

Culturally, embri long ago mastered social conditioning to eliminate all displays of emotion; they consider expressiveness to be barbaric, and the occasional embri who shows feelings openly is considered primitive and dangerous. As a side effect of keeping their own feelings in check, embri easily pick up on signs of emotions. To prevent inadvertent displays of emotion, embri wear ornate masks. These masks also denote social standing, civic responsibilities, and other designators that allow embri to immediately assess one another by sight. Embri wear their masks at all times, even when sleeping, and to be without a mask is a profound embarrassment—it evidences a gross exposure of an embri’s thoughts and feelings, rendering it unable to effectively protect its own emotions and too distracted to effectively read the expressions of others.

Few embri realize their rigid social hierarchy is controlled by the forces of Hell—scheming devils direct all embri activities from the secret tunnels beneath the mollusks’ home world. These dictates are conveyed by the small group of embri, known as Speakers, who communicate with the devils directly and enact their infernal designs. In exchange for this service, Speakers are granted magical powers and the secrets of diabolical manipulation. Some Speakers also serve as diplomats and envoys from the embri to the Pact Worlds. In these roles, they both shield their people from dangerously individualistic thinking and extend their masters’ designs to the rest of the galaxy. Speakers usually travel with a coterie of devoted embri servants who, in their uniquely expressionless way, idolize the Speaker as a celebrity.

The diabolic taint on embri society is pervasive, yet subtle. For example, the embri language now contains several Infernal words and phrases, and though embri shun symbols of deific obedience as an overemotional expression of connection to the divine, stylized iconography of infernal origin features prominently in modern embri architecture.

Many embri work hard to afford masks with magical abilities. In addition to the ordinary functions of displaying social status and shielding an embri’s emotions, these masks provide additional abilities to embri wearing them. One of the most common of these masks is the

.

Emotivore Mastermind

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 17 XP: 102,400

NE Medium undead (shapechanger)

Init.: +5 Senses: blindsense (emotion) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +29

Defense

HP: 285 RP: 6

EAC: 30 KAC: 31

Fort: +15 Ref: +15 Will: +20

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 30 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: claw +28 (8d6+17 S; critical shaken [see text])

Ranged: banshee sonic pistol +28 (4d8+17 So; critical deafen [DC 24])

Offensive Abilities: backlash (17 damage), feed, mental anguish (DC 26), mindbreaking link (DC 26), mindkiller (DC 26), sow doubt (DC 26, 8 rounds)

Spells Known: Known

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +5 Con:Wis: +8 Int: +3 Cha: +11

Skills: Acrobatics +29 (+37 to fly), Bluff +34, Culture +29, Intimidate +29, Mysticism +34, Sense Motive +29

Languages: Common

Gear: bespoke echelon fashion, banshee sonic pistol with 2 super-capacity batteries (80 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or cabal (1 plus 2–6 emotivores)

Special Abilities

Change Shape (Su) As a standard action, an emotivore can assume the shape of any Medium or Small humanoid, including specific individuals.

Emotionsense (Su) An emotivore constantly reads the surface emotions of creatures, providing the emotivore its blindsense. A creature can avoid detection by succeeding at a DC 27 Bluff check, but a creature under the influence of an emotion effect can’t avoid detection. Creatures affected by nondetection or similar effects automatically avoid detection. The emotivore can use this ability to focus on a creature it’s aware of, and if the creature fails a DC 22 Will saving throw, the emotivore learns that target’s desires, fears, and weaknesses, as well as its general disposition and attitude toward creatures within 30 feet of it. A creature’s weaknesses include physical vulnerabilities and inabilities. Unless otherwise stated, constructs and creatures with Intelligence scores of 2 or lower don’t have emotions and can’t be sensed this way.

Feed (Su) An emotivore can feed on a creature affected by the confused, cowering, fascinated, frightened, nauseated, panicked, shaken, or sickened conditions. To do so, the emotivore must make contact with the target by touching it (targeting an unwilling creature’s EAC), hitting the target with a claw attack, or casting mind thrust on the target (which must also fail the Will save against the spell). If the emotivore’s attempt succeeds, the target must succeed at a DC 22 Will saving throw or gain 1 temporary negative level. Upon imposing a negative level, the emotivore regains 10 Hit Points or gains 10 temporary Hit Points. If the emotivore dealt no damage when using this ability, feeding also subjects the target to a suggestion spell (Will DC 22 negates) asking the target to accept the emotivore’s touch again. An emotivore can gain a number of temporary Hit Points in this way equal to one-quarter of its maximum Hit Points (usually 30). Every 24 hours, an emotivore who has temporary Hit Points loses 10 of them. An emotivore who lacks temporary Hit Points usually seeks to feed. In addition, the emotivore mastermind can use the enervation spell to feed if the spell affects a creature already subjected to strong emotions.

Shaken (Su) On a critical hit, an emotivore’s claws can render a target shaken for 1d4 rounds (DC 18 Will save negates).

Description

Emotivores are undead that come into being when someone dies in the throes of intense feelings, especially among a large group of people experiencing similar emotions. An emotivore can take on a variety of anthropoid shapes, but its true form is a gaunt version of the creature whose death triggered its birth.

An emotivore manipulates and deceives to evoke feelings it can psychically feed upon. It chooses its appearance based on information it gleans from potential victims, assuming a shape that evokes a passionate response.

Emotivore

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 9 XP: 6,400

NE Medium undead (shapechanger)

Init.: +3 Senses: blindsense (emotion) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +17

Defense

HP: 120

EAC: 21 KAC: 22

Fort: +8 Ref: +8 Will: +12

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 30 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: claw +16 (3d4+9 S; critical shaken [see text])

Ranged: hailstorm-class zero pistol +16 (2d6+9 C; critical staggered [DC 18])

Offensive Abilities: feed

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +3 Con:Wis: +4 Int: +1 Cha: +6

Skills: Acrobatics +17 (+25 to fly), Bluff +22, Culture +17, Diplomacy +17, Intimidate +17, Sense Motive +17, Stealth +17

Languages: Common

Gear: d-suit III, hailstorm-class zero pistol with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or clique (3–6)

Special Abilities

Change Shape (Su) As a standard action, an emotivore can assume the shape of any Medium or Small humanoid, including specific individuals.

Emotionsense (Su) An emotivore constantly reads the surface emotions of creatures, providing the emotivore its blindsense. A creature can avoid detection by succeeding at a DC 27 Bluff check, but a creature under the influence of an emotion effect can’t avoid detection. Creatures affected by nondetection or similar effects automatically avoid detection. The emotivore can use this ability to focus on a creature it’s aware of, and if the creature fails a DC 18 Will saving throw, the emotivore learns that target’s desires, fears, and weaknesses, as well as its general disposition and attitude toward creatures within 30 feet of it. A creature’s weaknesses include physical vulnerabilities and inabilities. Unless otherwise stated, constructs and creatures with Intelligence scores of 2 or lower don’t have emotions and can’t be sensed this way.

Feed (Su) An emotivore can feed on a creature affected by the confused, cowering, fascinated, frightened, nauseated, panicked, shaken, or sickened conditions. To do so, the emotivore must make contact with the target by touching it (targeting an unwilling creature’s EAC), hitting the target with a claw attack, or casting mind thrust on the target (which must also fail the Will save against the spell). If the emotivore’s attempt succeeds, the target must succeed at a DC 18 Will saving throw or gain 1 temporary negative level. Upon imposing a negative level, the emotivore regains 10 Hit Points or gains 10 temporary Hit Points. If the emotivore dealt no damage when using this ability, feeding also subjects the target to a suggestion spell (Will DC 18 negates) asking the target to accept the emotivore’s touch again. An emotivore can gain a number of temporary Hit Points in this way equal to one-quarter of its maximum Hit Points (usually 30). Every 24 hours, an emotivore who has temporary Hit Points loses 10 of them. An emotivore who lacks temporary Hit Points usually seeks to feed.

Shaken (Su) On a critical hit, an emotivore’s claws can render a target shaken for 1d4 rounds (DC 18 Will save negates).

Description

Emotivores are undead that come into being when someone dies in the throes of intense feelings, especially among a large group of people experiencing similar emotions. An emotivore can take on a variety of anthropoid shapes, but its true form is a gaunt version of the creature whose death triggered its birth.

An emotivore manipulates and deceives to evoke feelings it can psychically feed upon. It chooses its appearance based on information it gleans from potential victims, assuming a shape that evokes a passionate response.

Feral Shotalashu

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

N Large magical (beast)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +18

Defense

HP: 90

EAC: 18 KAC: 20

Fort: +10 Ref: +10 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 60 ft.

Melee: claws +17 (1d8+8 S)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +5 Con: +3 Wis: +1 Int: -3 Cha: -1

Skills: Acrobatics +13, Perception +18, Stealth +13

Languages: Lashunta (can’t speak)

Ecology

Environment: warm forests (Castrovel)

Organization: solitary, pair, or pack (3–12)

Special Abilities

Jungle Strider (Ex) Shotalashus are adept at traversing all forms of forest terrain. While in forest terrain, a shotalashu’s speed is not impeded by natural difficult terrain such as undergrowth.

Pack Telepathy (Su) This functions as the shotalashu mount’s telepathic link ability (see the shotalashu

Description

For as long as lashuntas have been among the dominant species on Castrovel, shotalashus—the lashuntas’ traditional telepathic reptilian mounts—have served at their sides. Millennia of domestication and parallel evolution have strengthened the symbiotic bond between the two species, allowing lashuntas to form a close mental link with a chosen mount.

Shotalashus have rudimentary telepathic abilities similar to those of the lashuntas themselves, a fact that has contributed to their use as close pets and trusted mounts even in the modern day, when much more sophisticated and technologically advanced forms of both transportation and companionship exist. This tradition has lasted so long in part because of the kinship the lashuntas feel with their bonded shotalashus, but also because the symbiotic bond between the two species is deeply ingrained into lashunta culture. Shotalashu-mounted cavalry still serve as ceremonial honor guards for lashunta dignitaries, and members of all social stations regard their bonded mounts as occupying a cherished place in the family. Though shotalashus are seen less often in teeming metropolises than they are in smaller settlements, no city on Castrovel is devoid of at least basic amenities for the honored beasts, from training facilities to boarding services.

While it’s common for a lashunta to switch between shotalashus throughout her life, some bonds between beast and rider deepen over time, and it is not unheard of for a warrior to bond with a single shotalashu mount until death. Lashunta whose mounts die suffer psychic trauma and often require time to recover before they can bond with another mount, and shotalashus who lose their bonded riders have been known to grieve for months, or even years.

Though rare, some shotalashus still live in the wild, forming feral packs that use their telepathy to bond not with a rider, but with one another, forming a highly effective collective mind that makes them efficient and deadly hunters. Particularly adventurous lashuntas set out on solo quests into the most remote of Castrovel’s wilds in search of a potentially stronger mount from among untamed stock. These brave souls must first break an individual shotalashu away from its pack before attempting the long and arduous task of taming and eventually bonding with the creature.

A typical domesticated shotalashu is over 10 feet long from snout to tail-tip, and weighs more than 1,000 pounds, while wild specimens can grow as large as 12 feet in length and weigh a staggering 1,500 pounds.

As technology has advanced, telepathic bonding with shotalashus has become possible for those who aren’t lashunta. The lashuntas have also maintained traditional gear for shotalashu riding: the

and the

.

Formian Myrmarch

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 10 XP: 9,600

LN Large monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +3 (+7 with hive mind) Senses: blindsense (scent) 30 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +19 (+23 with hive mind)

Defense

HP: 165

EAC: 23 KAC: 25

Fort: +12 Ref: +14 Will: +11

Offense

Speed: 50 ft.

Melee: sting +23 (2d10+18 P plus myrmarch toxin)

Ranged: LFD sonic rifle +20 (2d10+10 So; critical deafen [DC 17])

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +8 Dex: +3 Con: +5 Wis: +2 Int: +2 Cha: +2

Skills: Diplomacy +24, Sense Motive +19, Stealth +19

Languages: Common; telepathy 150 ft.

Gear: LFD sonic rifle with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any land or underground (Castrovel)

Organization: solitary, team (2–4), platoon (1 plus 7–18 formian warriors and 6–12 formian workers), or royal guard (4 plus 12–20 formian warriors)

Special Abilities

Hive Mind (Ex) Formians operate from a shared hive intelligence that allows them to communicate nearly instantaneously. While within telepathic range of at least one other formian with this ability, a formian gains a +4 bonus to initiative and to Perception checks. If one formian is aware of a combatant, all members of the hive mind within range are aware of it, and a member of the hive mind cannot be surprised unless all members within range are surprised. If one member of the hive mind succeeds at a Will save to disbelieve an illusion effect, all members of that hive mind within telepathic range also disbelieve the effect.

Inspire Hive (Su) Once per day as a full action, a myrmarch can agitate the hive mind to empower all formian warriors and workers within range of its telepathy. For 10 minutes, each affected creature gains a +4 morale bonus to attack rolls, saving throws, and skill checks, as well as immunity to fear effects and temporary Hit Points equal to twice the creature’s CR. A creature can be affected by only one myrmarch’s inspire hive ability at a time.

Myrmarch Toxin

Type poison (injury); Save Fortitude DC 17
Track Dexterity; Frequency 1/round for 6 rounds
Effect The victim is also off-target while affected by this poison.
Cure 2 consecutive saves

Description

Formians resemble giant ants with humanoid upper bodies, and carve their chitinous plates with insignias reflecting their individual names and achievements. Members of a hive all share a telepathic link, allowing them to coordinate efficiently.

Within a hive are castes specialized to particular tasks. The queen leads the hive and is its sole means of propagation, while castes like the aristocratic myrmarchs and mercantile taskmasters direct lower castes like warriors and workers.

Formians are most common on Castrovel. For millennia they sought to eradicate the lashunta, their traditional foes, but their queens now instead focus on adopting other species’ technology to industrialize their traditional hive societies.

Formian Taskmaster

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

LN Medium monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +2 (+6 with hive mind) Senses: blindsense (scent) 30 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +14 (+18 with hive mind)

Defense

HP: 90

EAC: 18 KAC: 19

Fort: +6 Ref: +8 Will: +12

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: stinger +12 (1d8+8 P plus taskmaster toxin)

Ranged: thunderstrike streetsweeper +14 (1d10+7 So; critical knockdown)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +2 Con: +1 Wis: +5 Int: +2 Cha: +4

Skills: Diplomacy +19, Profession (merchant) +19, Sense Motive +14

Languages: Common; telepathy 120 ft.

Gear: thunderstrike streetsweeper with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any land or underground (Castrovel)

Organization: solitary, exchange (2–6), work crew (1 plus 6–12 formian workers), or band (1 plus 3–15 formian workers and 5–8 formian warriors)

Special Abilities

Hive Mind (Ex) Formians operate from a shared hive intelligence that allows them to communicate nearly instantaneously. While within telepathic range of at least one other formian with this ability, a formian gains a +4 bonus to initiative and to Perception checks. If one formian is aware of a combatant, all members of the hive mind within range are aware of it, and a member of the hive mind cannot be surprised unless all members within range are surprised. If one member of the hive mind succeeds at a Will save to disbelieve an illusion effect, all members of that hive mind within telepathic range also disbelieve the effect.

Mental Motivation (Su) As a move action, a taskmaster can inspire all other formians from the same hive within range of its telepathy, granting them a +2 morale bonus to attacks, skill checks, and saves against charm and fear effects for 1 minute. A creature can be affected by only one taskmaster’s mental motivation ability at a time.

Taskmaster Toxin

Type poison (injury); Save Fortitude DC 17
Track Dexterity; Frequency 1/round for 6 rounds
Cure 1 save

Description

Formians resemble giant ants with humanoid upper bodies, and carve their chitinous plates with insignias reflecting their individual names and achievements. Members of a hive all share a telepathic link, allowing them to coordinate efficiently.

Within a hive are castes specialized to particular tasks. The queen leads the hive and is its sole means of propagation, while castes like the aristocratic myrmarchs and mercantile taskmasters direct lower castes like warriors and workers.

Formians are most common on Castrovel. For millennia they sought to eradicate the lashunta, their traditional foes, but their queens now instead focus on adopting other species’ technology to industrialize their traditional hive societies.

Garaggakal Polymath

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 14 XP: 38,400

CE Large outsider (extraplanar)

Init.: +8 Senses: blindsight (emotion) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft., sense through (emotion) 60 ft. Perception: +25

Defense

HP: 255 RP: 5

EAC: 28 KAC: 30

Fort: +16 Ref: +16 Will: +14

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 60 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: bite +28 (8d6+20 P plus analyzed strike)

Offensive Abilities: leech life (DC 20)

Statistics

Str: +6 Dex: +8 Con: +4 Wis: +4 Int: +3 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +30 (+38 to fly), Athletics +25, Stealth +30, Survival +25

Languages: Garaggakal (can’t speak any language); telepathy 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any (the Drift)

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Analyzed Strike (Ex) A garaggakal polymath has spent centuries analyzing the species it has encountered in the Drift, and it uses this knowledge to target its prey’s most sensitive and vulnerable areas. Any creature that takes damage from the garaggakal’s bite attack must succeed at a DC 20 Fortitude save or become off-kilter (in zero gravity) or off-target for 1 round (in gravity).

Leech Life (Su) As a standard action, a garaggakal polymath can spend 1 Resolve Point to leech the life from one target within 30 feet. This deals 14d6 damage (Fortitude DC 20 half), and the garaggakal gains temporary Hit Points equal to the amount of damage dealt.

Phase Through (Su)

Description

The Drift remains very much a mystery to explorers and scholars in the Pact Worlds, and scientists have only recently discovered life-forms native to it. The garaggakal, sometimes called a “Drift wraith” by those spacefarers fortunate enough to have survived an encounter with these predators, is one such species. A garaggakal is mostly humanoid in form, with rubbery, yellowish skin, translucent wings, and a long reptilian tail. A garaggakal’s head is little more than a gaping, lamprey-like mouth filled with curved teeth. An average garaggakal has a 20-foot wingspan and stands around 8 feet tall, though its tail can more than double that length, and it weighs approximately 400 pounds. A garaggakal polymath can be 15 feet tall or more, weighing as much as 1,000 pounds.

Garaggakals freely roam the Drift on their diaphanous wings, hunting whatever living prey they can find. Garaggakals seem to divide all life into two categories: predators (such as themselves) and prey (everything else). To a garaggakal, the best way to learn more about a newly discovered species is to kill, dissect, and eat it—and not necessarily in that order.

Garaggakals are ambush predators. When a garaggakal encounters a living creature in the Drift, it stalks its prey, using stealth and its innate ability to phase through solid matter to approach undetected, before draining its victim’s life force from a distance. Garaggakals have been known to stalk entire starships, phasing through a vessel’s hull to hunt and feed on the crew inside.

When it comes time to reproduce, a garaggakal seeks out an area of intense radiation somewhere in the Drift, where it absorbs enough energy to undergo cytogenesis, literally creating new cells from the Drift’s planar energies to “build” its offspring. Upon completion, the process results in a fully grown adult garaggakal.

Garaggakals increase in size and strength as they age. A garaggakal can live for centuries, growing to more than twice its normal adult size. Called garaggakal polymaths, these elder creatures have a burning curiosity that drives them on ever-longer journeys through the Drift.

Garaggakal

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 5 XP: 1,600

CE Medium outsider (extraplanar)

Init.: +5 Senses: blindsight (emotion) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft., sense through (emotion) 60 ft. Perception: +11

Defense

HP: 75 RP: 4

EAC: 17 KAC: 19

Fort: +7 Ref: +7 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 60 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: bite +12 (2d6+9 P)

Offensive Abilities: leech life (DC 13)

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +5 Con: +3 Wis: +2 Int: +1 Cha: -2

Skills: Acrobatics +16 (+24 to fly), Athletics +11, Stealth +16, Survival +11

Languages: Garaggakal (can’t speak any language); telepathy 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any (the Drift)

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Leech Life (Su) As a standard action, a garaggakal can spend 1 Resolve Point to leech the life from one target within 30 feet. This deals 3d6 damage (Fortitude DC 13 half), and the garaggakal gains temporary Hit Points equal to the amount of damage dealt.

Phase Through (Su)

Description

The Drift remains very much a mystery to explorers and scholars in the Pact Worlds, and scientists have only recently discovered life-forms native to it. The garaggakal, sometimes called a “Drift wraith” by those spacefarers fortunate enough to have survived an encounter with these predators, is one such species. A garaggakal is mostly humanoid in form, with rubbery, yellowish skin, translucent wings, and a long reptilian tail. A garaggakal’s head is little more than a gaping, lamprey-like mouth filled with curved teeth. An average garaggakal has a 20-foot wingspan and stands around 8 feet tall, though its tail can more than double that length, and it weighs approximately 400 pounds. A garaggakal polymath can be 15 feet tall or more, weighing as much as 1,000 pounds.

Garaggakals freely roam the Drift on their diaphanous wings, hunting whatever living prey they can find. Garaggakals seem to divide all life into two categories: predators (such as themselves) and prey (everything else). To a garaggakal, the best way to learn more about a newly discovered species is to kill, dissect, and eat it—and not necessarily in that order.

Garaggakals are ambush predators. When a garaggakal encounters a living creature in the Drift, it stalks its prey, using stealth and its innate ability to phase through solid matter to approach undetected, before draining its victim’s life force from a distance. Garaggakals have been known to stalk entire starships, phasing through a vessel’s hull to hunt and feed on the crew inside.

When it comes time to reproduce, a garaggakal seeks out an area of intense radiation somewhere in the Drift, where it absorbs enough energy to undergo cytogenesis, literally creating new cells from the Drift’s planar energies to “build” its offspring. Upon completion, the process results in a fully grown adult garaggakal.

Garaggakals increase in size and strength as they age. A garaggakal can live for centuries, growing to more than twice its normal adult size. Called garaggakal polymaths, these elder creatures have a burning curiosity that drives them on ever-longer journeys through the Drift.

Gargantuan Herd Animal

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

N Gargantuan animal

Init.: +0 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +13

Defense

HP: 90

EAC: 18 KAC: 20

Fort: +11 Ref: +8 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: natural weapon +15 (2d4+12 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +6 Dex: +0 Con: +4 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +18

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or herd (3–12)

Description

From the ruthigs of Castrovel to the wollipeds of Triaxus, herd animals are beasts that gather in social groups comprised entirely of creatures of the same species. Herding behavior allows animals to gather and move together for protection from predators. Most commonly, herd animals are herbivores or docile omnivores.

better represent fiercer animals, including aggressive herbivores and omnivores that may or may not move in groups of their own kind.

In the Pact Worlds, the most common herd animals are domesticated. When various species took to exploring and colonizing the stars, they brought their livestock with them. For instance, cattle, goats, and sheep can be found on Absalom Station, as well as on any world where humans have a significant presence. Herd animals in the Pact Worlds serve a variety of purposes in the various societies that cultivate and support them. Farmers and engineers commonly maintain groups of herd animals to harvest their meat, though keeping herd animals for their shorn fur to create textiles is a more sustainable practice. Other cultivators leverage herd animals as mounts or pack animals, and training these docile creatures can result in large profits for professionals who are particularly skilled in this pursuit.

More rarely, some xenobiologists even cultivate groups of herd animals for scientists and corporations who wish to stabilize wild planets’ ecosystems. In this case, interested parties might place large numbers of pack animals in foreign locales to help tame rampant vegetation growth or provide prey for a dying species of predator. The goal of such projects is almost always to improve a planet’s suitability for colonization, mining, or farming. However, this practice is often controversial among ethnobiologists, who argue that introducing large populations of non-native species in this manner produces harmful and unforeseen results more often than it aids environments.

The herd animals in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique herd animal, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, from antlers to hooves, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts (see page 138). Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

The ruthig is a mammal with six legs, padded feet with toenails, a long and thin neck, an extended jaw with flat teeth, a lengthy and rough tongue, and two pairs of eyes. Its shaggy fur is home to a plethora of algae and moss species, giving the ruthig a mottled green color useful as camouflage in the herbivore’s native woodlands. Wild ruthigs travel in grazing herds, which are less camouflaged during the birthing season when gray-furred young are born. People of Castrovel domesticate the beasts for their honey-sweet milk and succulent meat.

A ruthig is a Medium herd animal that is about 4 feet tall at the withers and 6 feet tall with its head raised high. On average, a ruthig weighs about 250 pounds. A ruthig can use its bludgeoning kick as a natural weapon, and it has camouflage when in forested terrain.

Gargantuan Predator

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 10 XP: 9,600

N Gargantuan animal

Init.: +1 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +19

Defense

HP: 165

EAC: 23 KAC: 25

Fort: +14 Ref: +9 Will: +10

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: natural weapon +21 (2d10+17 P or S)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +7 Dex: +1 Con: +4 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +19

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or pack (3–6)

Description

From the vortex sharks of Kalo-Mahoi to the hoarbats of Verces’s Darkside, and from the dire tigers of Castrovel to the tremor worms of Akiton, predators abound in the Pact Worlds and on planets across the galaxy. What unites these disparate species is that their diets include the meat of other creatures and that they hunt and kill to acquire this food. On planets where sapient species are dominant, predators have learned that weapon-wielding creatures can be deadly prey. Other predators, deprived of such contact, often see sentient explorers as an unfamiliar form of potential sustenance, making confrontations inevitable.

Predators come in all shapes and sizes, limited only by the environment where they are found. Bigger predators rely on abundant food, cycles of inactivity, an omnivorous diet, or a combination of these. Smaller predators have fewer requirements and can be equally dangerous; even very small animals can evolve pack tactics to overwhelm larger and stronger creatures. Some of these swarms, such as the flying viper eels of Bretheda, strip flesh from bone as they move over and around prey.

The predators in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique predator, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, from claws to slams, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts. Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

The vortex shark is a slim, cartilaginous fish that lives in the depths of Kalo-Mahoi’s oceans. The creature is bioluminescent and has a four-part jaw with rows of hooked teeth. A vortex shark’s natural weapon is a bite that deals slashing damage, has the bleed 1d6 critical hit effect, and allows the shark’s teeth to grab ahold of a target. The female of the species grows larger than the male and lays eggs in pouches she leaves behind. Young fend for themselves when they hatch, catching weaker siblings for a first meal. An adult vortex shark is a Large aquatic predator, averaging 12 feet in length and 1,000 pounds in weight. The sharks can breathe only water and have a land speed of 0 feet and a swim speed of 60 feet. Living in Kalo-Mahoi’s seas has inured them to cold (resistance 5 to cold), and they have blindsense (scent) out to 30 feet and the tracking (scent) special ability for waterborne prey, which they use mostly to hunt bleeding creatures.

Ghost

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

CE Medium undead (incorporeal)

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +19

Defense

HP: 90 RP: 3

EAC: 18 KAC: 19

Fort: +7 Ref: +7 Will: +11

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 60 ft. (Su, average)

Melee: corrupting touch +11 (7d6, DC 17)

Offensive Abilities: backlash, corrupting gaze (DC 17), corrupting touch (DC 17), distraction (DC 17), frightful moan (DC 17), share pain, sow doubt

Spells Known: Known

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +2 Con:Wis: +5 Int: +1 Cha: +4

Skills: Acrobatics +14, Disguise +19, Intimidate +14, Mysticism +19, Sense Motive +19, Stealth +19

Languages: Common, 1 other language known in life

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Corrupting Gaze (Su) The ghost has a gaze ability with a range of 30 feet that deals 1d4 Charisma damage plus 1d10 cold damage per 3 CR (a Fortitude save negates the Charisma damage, but not the physical damage).

Corrupting Touch (Su) As a standard action, the ghost can make a single melee attack against EAC. On a hit, this attack deals 7d6 damage. This damage has no type—it manifests in the form of aches from supernatural aging. Creatures immune to magical aging are immune to this damage, but otherwise the damage bypasses all forms of damage reduction. A Fortitude save halves the damage dealt.

Frightful Moan (Su) The ghost can emit a frightful moan as a standard action. All living creatures within a 30-foot radius of the ghost must succeed at a Will save or become frightened for 2d4 rounds. Ghosts of CR 10 or higher cause creatures that fail the save to gain the paralyzed condition for 1 round. Ghosts of CR 15 or higher also cause creatures that fail the save to gain the cowering condition for 1d4 rounds. This is a hearing-dependent, mind-affecting fear effect. A creature that successfully saves against frightful moan cannot be affected by the same ghost’s moan for 24 hours.

Rejuvenation (Su) In most cases, ghosts cannot be destroyed by violence—a “destroyed” spirit dematerializes, but restores itself in 2d4 days. The only way to permanently destroy a ghost is to determine the reason for its existence and set right whatever prevents it from resting in peace. The exact means varies with each spirit and should be determined by the GM when creating the ghost.

Description

In most cases, when a creature dies, its soul is severed from its physical body and sent on to its fate in the afterlife. However, sometimes souls are bound to the physical world by powerful emotion and cannot move on. While ghosts bound by positive emotions do exist, in most cases horrendous injustice creates ghosts. A ghost’s every action and thought is devoted to the emotion that bound it to the physical world, such that most ghosts become hateful mockeries of their mortal selves.

Ghoul Shock Trooper

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 11 XP: 12,800

CE Medium undead

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +20

Defense

HP: 180

EAC: 25 KAC: 26

Fort: +13 Ref: +11 Will: +14

Offense

Speed: 30 ft. (20 ft. in armor)

Melee: bite +23 (4d6+16 P plus ghoul fever and paralysis) or claw +23 (4d6+16 S plus paralysis)

Ranged: perihelion artillery laser +21 (3d8+11 F; critical burn 2d6) or tactical autobeam rifle +21 (3d8+11 F; critical burn 2d6) or frag grenade IV +20 (explode [15 ft., 6d6 P, DC 18])

Offensive Abilities: fighting styles (guard, hit-and-run), nimble fusillade, opening volley, soldier’s onslaught

Statistics

Str: +8 Dex: +5 Con:Wis: +2 Int: +3 Cha: +3

Skills: Acrobatics +25, Athletics +20, Stealth +20

Languages: Common, Eoxian

Gear: golemforged plating IV, perihelion artillery laser with 1 ultra-capacity battery (100 charges), tactical autobeam rifle with 1 high-capacity battery (40 charges), frag grenades IV (2)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, gang (2–6), or pack (7–12)

Special Abilities

Paralysis (Ex) When a ghoul shock trooper deals damage to a creature with its bite or claw attack, the target must succeed at a DC 18 Fortitude saving throw or gain the paralyzed condition for 1d4+1 rounds. As a full action, the target can attempt a new saving throw to end the condition. Creatures with the elf subtype are immune to a ghoul’s paralysis.

Description

In ages past, ghouls shunned society and haunted cemeteries and city sewers. However, ghouls in the Pact Worlds are more likely to live in cities, especially settlements inhabited primarily by undead. Ghouls are resourceful and hardy, and make good workers across a variety of industries. Their adaptability is striking even for undead creatures, and ghouls who are patient and dedicated can become excellent researchers, scholars, soldiers, laborers, and more. Ghouls of all proficiencies and backgrounds are especially populous on the undead planet of Eox.

Ghouls spread—sometimes purposefully—a virulent disease known as ghoul fever through their saliva. As creatures that die of ghoul fever often rise as ghouls themselves, a population explosion can easily result. However, even in ghoul society, it is frowned upon to inflict ghoul fever on large numbers of living creatures. Such behavior leads to unwanted attention from authorities, particularly on worlds adjacent to or in the Pact Worlds.

Rather than spread the undead scourge they carry inside them, ambitious ghouls instead seek training and selfimprovement in pursuits that interest them. Many of these ghouls become ghoul shock troopers. Others find that technology suits them and become mechanics or technomancers, fusing their shrewd understanding of their own organic biology with the elegance of machinery. Ghoul envoys are rare, since undead are stubbornly independent as a rule, and few living crew members would follow the commands of someone so off-putting as a ghoul.

Whether on Eox or beyond, certain powerful ghouls known as ghasts can affect even elves with their paralysis, and exude a powerful stench; these undead usually hold important positions in ghoul society. Ghouls that lurk underwater and in coastal areas are called lacedons. In many cases, powerful ghouls and lacedons are high-ranking members of the military on Eox or even the Corpse Fleet.

Ghoul

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 400

CE Medium undead

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 18

EAC: 12 KAC: 12

Fort: +3 Ref: +3 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: bite +5 (1d6+3 P plus ghoul fever and paralysis) or claw +5 (1d6+3 S plus paralysis)

Ranged: azimuth laser pistol +8 (1d4+1 F; critical burn 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +4 Con:Wis: +0 Int: +1 Cha: +1

Skills: Acrobatics +5, Athletics +5, Stealth +10

Languages: Common, Eoxian

Gear: azimuth laser pistol with 1 battery (20 charges)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, gang (2–6), or pack (7–12)

Special Abilities

Paralysis (Ex) When a ghoul deals damage to a creature with its bite or claw attack, the target must succeed at a DC 12 Fortitude saving throw or gain the paralyzed condition for 1d4+1 rounds. As a full action, the target can attempt a new saving throw to end the condition. Creatures with the elf subtype are immune to a ghoul’s paralysis.

Ghoul Fever

Type disease (injury); Save Fortitude DC 12
Track physical; Frequency 1/day
Effect A creature that dies of ghoul fever rises as a ghoul within 24 hours.
Cure 1 save

Description

In ages past, ghouls shunned society and haunted cemeteries and city sewers. However, ghouls in the Pact Worlds are more likely to live in cities, especially settlements inhabited primarily by undead. Ghouls are resourceful and hardy, and make good workers across a variety of industries. Their adaptability is striking even for undead creatures, and ghouls who are patient and dedicated can become excellent researchers, scholars, soldiers, laborers, and more. Ghouls of all proficiencies and backgrounds are especially populous on the undead planet of Eox.

Ghouls spread—sometimes purposefully—a virulent disease known as ghoul fever through their saliva. As creatures that die of ghoul fever often rise as ghouls themselves, a population explosion can easily result. However, even in ghoul society, it is frowned upon to inflict ghoul fever on large numbers of living creatures. Such behavior leads to unwanted attention from authorities, particularly on worlds adjacent to or in the Pact Worlds.

Rather than spread the undead scourge they carry inside them, ambitious ghouls instead seek training and selfimprovement in pursuits that interest them. Many of these ghouls become ghoul shock troopers. Others find that technology suits them and become mechanics or technomancers, fusing their shrewd understanding of their own organic biology with the elegance of machinery. Ghoul envoys are rare, since undead are stubbornly independent as a rule, and few living crew members would follow the commands of someone so off-putting as a ghoul.

Whether on Eox or beyond, certain powerful ghouls known as ghasts can affect even elves with their paralysis, and exude a powerful stench; these undead usually hold important positions in ghoul society. Ghouls that lurk underwater and in coastal areas are called lacedons. In many cases, powerful ghouls and lacedons are high-ranking members of the military on Eox or even the Corpse Fleet.

Glass Serpent

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 5 XP: 1,600

N Gargantuan magical (beast)

Init.: +3 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +16

Defense

HP: 77

EAC: 16 KAC: 20

Fort: +9 Ref: +9 Will: +4

Offense

Speed: 60 ft., climb 30 ft., swim 30 ft.

Melee: tentacle +15 (1d6+11 S plus swallow whole)

Offensive Abilities: swallow whole (1d6+5 A, EAC 16, KAC 16, 19 HP)

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +3 Con: +1 Wis: +2 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +13 (+21 to climb or swim), Stealth +13, Survival +13

Ecology

Environment: any (Eox)

Organization: solitary, rival pair, or brood family (2–3 adults and 3–5 juveniles)

Special Abilities

Ravenous Invisibility (Ex) A glass serpent can become invisible as part of any other action. Each time it successfully damages a creature while invisible, it must attempt a DC 14 Will save. If it fails, this ability is suspended and the glass serpent becomes visible for 1 round (though it can turn invisible again at the start of its next turn). A glass serpent that has swallowed a creature cannot turn invisible using this ability until 1 week after it swallowed the creature, when its meal has been completely digested. (If the swallowed creature escapes or is otherwise removed, the glass serpent can use this ability again immediately.) An invisible glass serpent can resume being visible as part of any other action.

Description

The terrifying ambush predators known as glass serpents are some of the most notorious beasts to roam the blasted wastelands of Eox, preying on local fauna and unwary undead alike. Similar creatures have been found on dozens of planets, including those outside the Pact Worlds, leading scholars to speculate that glass serpents may have been brought to Eox in its ancient past through magical means, or that they may represent a natural case of parallel evolution on worlds that have suffered massive catastrophes.

Glass serpents have long, undulating bodies that bulge and narrow at regular intervals, giving them a shape almost like a chain of thick links. Their heads are much different from those of traditional snakes, with a row of eyes peering out from beneath an armored, helmetlike crest, and long feeding tentacles each tipped with a glowing, crystalline tooth dangling from their mouths. Yet, the most fearsome aspect of glass serpents must be their legendary scales: smooth crystalline structures that warp and wrap light around the serpents, turning them invisible and making them terrifying combatants. This invisibility isn’t entirely voluntary and requires enough energy from a serpent that it can activate the ability only when it is hungry and hunting. When well fed, the serpent becomes visible once more, its body appearing partially translucent and strewn with shimmering rainbows. This weakness is of no comfort to those creatures that become the serpent’s prey and provide it with sustenance, pieces of which are visible as they pass through the serpent’s translucent digestive system. An adult glass serpent can grow to be 60 feet long and up to 5,000 pounds.

Hermaphroditic and capable of mating as long as they’re sufficiently nourished, glass serpents have a fascinating courtship process. A glass serpent looking to mate seeks out another glass serpent of roughly its own size and ability level and challenges it in an elaborate ritual. Once this challenge is accepted, the two become a “rival pair.” For the next 6 weeks, the two travel together, hunting in tandem but violently attempting to keep the other from eating a share of any slain prey. At the end of this period, they seek out the largest and most powerful glass serpent they can find and attempt to woo this third serpent into accepting the mantle of motherhood via displays of their prowess and gifts of regurgitated food. If this third serpent agrees, it and the larger, better-fed member of the rival pair—called the “bull”—mate. The bull then departs, and the other member of the rival pair—the “guard”—remains to serve the pregnant serpent, bringing food and providing defense until the young are born. Young glass serpents are capable of hunting on their own within a month, at which point all members of the family go their separate ways.

Not intelligent enough to be considered truly sentient, glass serpents are nevertheless cunning hunters and opportunists, with natural curiosity and adaptability in addition to their predatory instincts. Although glass serpents can diminish the glow in their tentacles’ crystalline teeth to better preserve their invisibility, they understand that the light itself remains visible even when their bodies are not. As such, many will purposefully illuminate these lures while invisible, creating delicate, dancing displays of light or even mimicking signal beacons, hoping to draw prey near. Glass serpents have learned that creatures from other worlds often require air, and they specifically target such creatures, ripping open environment suits, vehicles, or structures to asphyxiate their prey.

For all the danger they present, glass serpents have long been a part of Eoxian culture, taking on the cultural role of noble predator that other groups often ascribe to wolves, lions, eagles, or dragons. Domesticated glass serpents are the chosen hunting beasts of both the planet’s nobility and its criminal organizations. Several Bone Sages and ancient organizations have glass serpents on their coats of arms or corporate logos, and execution by glass serpent is an ancient practice that still continues. In recent centuries, the creatures have been heavily exported to other planets, partially for their status in Eoxian culture but more often because their scales can be commercially harvested for illusion magic and a wide variety of optical technologies. The challenge of imprisoning smart animals that can turn invisible and don’t need to breathe means that wild glass serpent populations can now be found on nearly every terrestrial or aquatic planet in the Pact Worlds and many colony worlds beyond. Most notably, the Diaspora has seen significant problems with glass serpents adapting to the highly trafficked waterways of the River Between, where despite their slight disadvantage in movement and stealth, they still prove devastating to travelers. Many crèche worlds regularly hire mercenaries and adventurers to hunt down and eradicate these serpents, but the population keeps mysteriously bouncing back.

Haeshi-Shaa (Haeshi Form)

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 12 XP: 19,200

CE Large aberration

Init.: +5 Senses: blindsight (life) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +22

Aura: stench (10 ft., DC 19)

Defense

HP: 200

EAC: 26 KAC: 28

Fort: +14 Ref: +11 Will: +16

Offense

Speed: fly 60 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: slam +25 (6d4+20 B plus viral vapor)

Ranged: sonic bolt +22 (6d4+12 So)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +8 Dex: +5 Con: +4 Wis: +4 Int: +2 Cha: +2

Skills: Acrobatics +22 (+30 to fly), Life Science +22, Mysticism +27, Physical Science +22

Languages: Abyssal, Aklo, Common; telepathy 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Death Throes (Su) When killed, a haeshi explodes in a frenetic wave of psychic energy that assaults the minds of creatures within 20 feet, dealing 6d6 damage (Will DC 19 half). This is a mind-affecting effect.

Sonic Bolt (Ex) A haeshi-shaa can fire a beam of disruptive sound at a target within 100 feet.

Stench Aura (Ex) Haeshi-shaas exude a horrible stench. An affected creature must succeed at a Fortitude save with the listed DC or be sickened while within the aura’s effect. Sickened creatures become nauseated on subsequent failed saving throws.

Viral Vapor

Type disease (contact, inhaled, or injury); Save Fortitude DC 18
Track physical; Frequency 1/day
Effect At the debilitated state, the victim becomes partially vaporous. Attacks made by or targeting the victim have a 25% miss chance. At bedridden, this effect ends and the victim is incorporeal. At dead, the victim’s form completely dissipates into fine particles.
Cure

Description

Serving as part of the priestly caste for the Dominion of the Black, haeshi-shaas are longlived creatures that shift between a liquid and a gaseous form many times over their long lives. Their liquid form, commonly referred to simply as haeshi, appears as a constantly churning, chunky fluid, while their vaporous form, known as shaa, appears as a hazy brown fog. Both forms hum with atonal harmonies that are unnerving, sometimes nauseating, to others.

While both forms of haeshi-shaas constantly preach a doctrine of annihilation, each form takes a slightly different approach. The attitudes of an individual haeshi-shaa change as the creature shifts forms. Liquid haeshi are more aggressive, while vaporous shaa are more introspective.

The creatures’ dogma of obliteration and their reverence for black holes stem from their belief that all cosmic complexity should be reduced to its most basic particles, because only in that state can a being be truly one with the universe.

Haeshi-shaas serve as oracles, as they claim the ability to see the invisible pathways through the universe connecting particles spiraling toward entropy. Though this claim is dubious, other creatures that serve the Dominion heed the lessons of both haeshi-shaas and chyzaedus, another member of its priestly caste.

Haeshi-shaas and chyzaedus are relatively recent assimilations into the Dominion, given its galactic time scale, and each species has claimed a different role within the nightmarish collective. The Dominion of the Black doesn’t concern itself with faith and religion, but the coalition seems to have a use for these strange creatures that preach its philosophy.

Many believe that the two species came into the role of priests among the Dominion because they are linked in destruction. Forgotten records claim that the tonal resonance that all chyzaedus experienced when their home planet was devoured by a black hole was a result of creatures that would become the haeshi-shaas. These creatures were known in ancient history as beings of pure sound whose strange, farreaching tones conveyed a slightly different message of consumption and destruction.

Haeshi-shaas can’t predict when they might shift into their variant form. Some seek out events that might serve as a catalyst, while others wait for the change to occur naturally. These creatures can exist for ages, shifting thousands of times, but over time, the bonds that cause the cyclical shifts of a haeshi-shaa’s form deteriorate. A haeshi-shaa can live for as long as 25,000 years before its final shift comes to pass and it completely dissipates among the winds of the universe.

Haeshi-Shaa (Shaa Form)

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 16 XP: 76,800

NE Large aberration

Init.: +10 Senses: blindsight (life) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +28

Aura: stench (10 ft., DC 22)

Defense

HP: 300

EAC: 29 KAC: 30

Fort: +14 Ref: +14 Will: +20

Offense

Speed: fly 60 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: touch +25 (viral vapor)

Ranged: sonic bolt +27 (6d4+16 So)

Offensive Abilities: expand, thicken

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +10 Con: +7 Wis: +5 Int: +3 Cha: +5

Skills: Acrobatics +28 (+36 to fly), Life Science +28, Mysticism +33, Physical Science +28

Languages: Abyssal, Aklo, Common; telepathy 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Expand (Ex) As a full action, a shaa can spread its matter thin, increasing its size to Gargantuan and gaining a space and reach of 20 feet. A shaa can maintain this ability as long as it concentrates, but it can take only purely mental actions or its thicken ability while in this state. A shaa can return to its normal size as a move action.

Sonic Bolt (Su) A haeshi-shaa can fire a beam of disruptive sound at a target within 100 feet.

Stench Aura (Ex) Haeshi-shaas exude a horrible stench. An affected creature must succeed at a Fortitude save with the listed DC or be sickened while within the aura’s effect. Sickened creatures become nauseated on subsequent failed saving throws.

Thicken (Ex) A shaa can agitate its molecules and assume a nearly impenetrable, semitransparent form. As a full action, a shaa can become solid for 1d6 rounds. In this form, the shaa is not incorporeal, gains DR 30/— and 100 temporary Hit Points, can take no actions, and is immovable. The shaa reverts to its natural form at the end of the duration and loses any remaining temporary Hit Points.

Viral Vapor

Type disease (contact, inhaled, or injury); Save Fortitude DC 18
Track physical; Frequency 1/day
Effect At the debilitated state, the victim becomes partially vaporous. Attacks made by or targeting the victim have a 25% miss chance. At bedridden, this effect ends and the victim is incorporeal. At dead, the victim’s form completely dissipates into fine particles.
Cure

Description

Serving as part of the priestly caste for the Dominion of the Black, haeshi-shaas are longlived creatures that shift between a liquid and a gaseous form many times over their long lives. Their liquid form, commonly referred to simply as haeshi, appears as a constantly churning, chunky fluid, while their vaporous form, known as shaa, appears as a hazy brown fog. Both forms hum with atonal harmonies that are unnerving, sometimes nauseating, to others.

While both forms of haeshi-shaas constantly preach a doctrine of annihilation, each form takes a slightly different approach. The attitudes of an individual haeshi-shaa change as the creature shifts forms. Liquid haeshi are more aggressive, while vaporous shaa are more introspective.

The creatures’ dogma of obliteration and their reverence for black holes stem from their belief that all cosmic complexity should be reduced to its most basic particles, because only in that state can a being be truly one with the universe.

Haeshi-shaas serve as oracles, as they claim the ability to see the invisible pathways through the universe connecting particles spiraling toward entropy. Though this claim is dubious, other creatures that serve the Dominion heed the lessons of both haeshi-shaas and chyzaedus, another member of its priestly caste.

Haeshi-shaas and chyzaedus are relatively recent assimilations into the Dominion, given its galactic time scale, and each species has claimed a different role within the nightmarish collective. The Dominion of the Black doesn’t concern itself with faith and religion, but the coalition seems to have a use for these strange creatures that preach its philosophy.

Many believe that the two species came into the role of priests among the Dominion because they are linked in destruction. Forgotten records claim that the tonal resonance that all chyzaedus experienced when their home planet was devoured by a black hole was a result of creatures that would become the haeshi-shaas. These creatures were known in ancient history as beings of pure sound whose strange, farreaching tones conveyed a slightly different message of consumption and destruction.

Haeshi-shaas can’t predict when they might shift into their variant form. Some seek out events that might serve as a catalyst, while others wait for the change to occur naturally. These creatures can exist for ages, shifting thousands of times, but over time, the bonds that cause the cyclical shifts of a haeshi-shaa’s form deteriorate. A haeshi-shaa can live for as long as 25,000 years before its final shift comes to pass and it completely dissipates among the winds of the universe.

Hashukayak

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 5 XP: 1,600

N Large animal

Init.: +0 Senses: blindsense (scent) 60 ft., low-light vision; see sexual dimorphism Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 70

EAC: 17 KAC: 19, see sexual dimorphism

Fort: +9 Ref: +8 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., see sexual dimorphism

Melee: slam +14 (2d6+7 B; critical knockdown) or gore +13 (3d6+6 P; critical bleed 1d6); see sexual dimorphism

Offensive Abilities: trample (2d6+7 B, DC 13)

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +0 Con: +4 Wis: +2 Int: -4 Cha: -1

Skills: Athletics +10; see sexual dimorphism

Ecology

Environment: temperate plains or hills (Orikolai)

Organization: solitary, gang (2–9 males), or herd (5–20 females and young)

Special Abilities

Sexual Dimorphism (Ex) Male and female hashukayaks manifest different physical traits during adolescence, and an adult gains several additional abilities that modify the statistics above.

Males develop a voluminous ruff of fur along their necks, front shoulder joints, and humps. They are also heavier, with stout horns growing from their heads and front shoulders. These adaptations grant a male hashukayak a gore attack (included in the statistics above), a +1 bonus to KAC, and a +15 bonus to Intimidate checks.

Female hashukayaks are less massive, more adaptable, and far swifter. Their fur ruffs extend only across their necks but connect to dense arrays of nerve cells that help detect smells, wind, and movement. These adaptations grant a female hashukayak a +1 bonus to EAC, a 40-foot land speed, blindsense (vibration) with a range of 30 feet, and a +10 bonus to Survival checks.

Description

Due to its rare ring shape, the planet Orikolai is a place of diverse environments, variable gravity, and extreme seasons where one side of the planet is in constant light for hundreds of days at a time while the other side is in perpetual gloom. Whereas some species hibernate or have evolved to spend months at a time in darkness, hashukayaks tirelessly migrate from one side of the ring to the other in pursuit of sunlight and the lush plants on which they feed. These massive beasts are a keystone species, serving as prey for many of the planet’s large carnivores, dispersing seeds over huge areas, and cropping grasses to make way for new growth.

Although hashukayaks demonstrate considerable sexual dimorphism, they have many traits in common. Each is an eight-legged herbivore about 10 feet long and 5 feet tall at the shoulder, weighing about 4,000 pounds in a normal gravity environment (though the gravity on Orikolai is irregular). Hashukayaks store excess fat and water in a double hump at the base of the neck, which they use to store nutrients when crossing less hospitable terrain. A hashukayak’s eight eyes can focus independently, and each perceives a different spectrum of light, allowing the animal to see in dim conditions as well as sense subtle cues in the atmosphere that signal the changing seasons. To handle the reduced oxygen levels and air density toward the planet’s rim, these creatures have a second set of lungs that can inflate and more efficiently process thin air. These lungs also help to keep the animals buoyant in water, making them clumsy but capable swimmers.

A hashukayak primarily feeds on grasses, which it plucks with eight feeding tentacles arrayed around its mouth. The animal relies on its gizzard and a series of five stomachs to break down the vegetation in several cycles of fermentation aided by its rich, digestive microbiome. Hashukayaks diversify their diet as opportunities allow, digging up roots, breaking into insect colonies to snatch up larvae, or even consuming the occasional carrion. Only in three documented cases have the creatures actively chased down larger fauna to consume, and each incident seemed to be aberrant behavior associated with nutritional deficiencies or high stress.

Adult male and female hashukayaks live different lifestyles and inhabit different territories that overlap only periodically. When most amateur xenobiologists think of hashukayaks, they imagine the female adult, bald but for a narrow band of long hairs around the neck. These sensitive whiskers allow female hashukayaks to sense an array of stimuli, and their leaner bodies allow them to cover large distances to find food or escape predators. Female hashukayaks gather in large herds for protection, traveling with their young. As the long summer ends, these herds migrate from the higher-gravity equator toward the rim, where the planet’s divergent tectonic plates form warm lakes and fertile grasslands.

There, the males live year round in the low-gravity plains. Male hashukayaks grow bulkier in this environment, but for all the competitive advantages their mass provides, they have a limited range. In an area with normal gravity, a male moves at half speed and gradually becomes sick and dies as its weight compresses its digestive tract. The front third of a male’s body is covered in dense hair, with the greatest concentration around its neck and hump. This shields the animal from the broad horns that males grow and use to battle one another for dominance during the long summers. For all their brutal competition, male hashukayaks become much more docile during the transitional season, when the migratory females and juveniles travel to the rim. At that time, dominant males use their feeding tentacles to build elaborate altars or bowers made of logs, dried grasses, and smoothed pebbles. The fancier the installation and its contents, the more attractive the male, and accomplished architects can mate numerous times in a season.

Hobgoblin Lieutenant

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

LE Medium humanoid (goblinoid)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +14

Defense

HP: 105

EAC: 19 KAC: 21, +1 vs. combat maneuvers

Fort: +9 Ref: +7 Will: +8

Offense

Speed: 30 ft. (25 ft. in armor)

Melee: sintered longsword +14 (2d8+13 S)

Ranged: corona laser rifle +18 (2d6+7 F; critical burn 1d6) or stickybomb grenade II +17 (explode [15 ft., entangle 2d4 rounds, DC 15])

Offensive Abilities: fighting styles (hit-and-run), furious combatant, nimble fusillade, opening volley

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +5 Con: +2 Wis: +0 Int: +0 Cha: +1

Skills: Athletics +14, Intimidate +14, Stealth +19

Languages: Common, Goblin

Gear: golemforged plating III, corona laser rifle with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each), sintered longsword, stickybomb grenades II (2)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, small command (1–2 plus 4–10 hobgoblin troopers), command unit (3–6 plus 1

Special Abilities

Battle Hardened (Ex) Hobgoblins are trained for combat from an early age, and they quickly learn that a foe can do much more than just hurt you. Hobgoblins gain a +1 racial bonus to AC against combat maneuvers.

Furious Combatant (Ex) When a hobgoblin lieutenant scores a critical hit against a foe, the hobgoblin can attempt an Intimidate check to demoralize that foe as a reaction.

Description

Hobgoblins are a militant and merciless species that organizes quickly, reproduces rapidly, and adapts well to changing conditions. They are similar in appearance to goblins but are significantly taller and more muscled. While goblins are anarchic and gleefully destructive, though, hobgoblins are highly ordered and do nothing without a purpose.

Most hobgoblin societies are paramilitary states, with no distinction between the government and the chain of command. They can be as small as a single starship crew or as large as a conquered world. However, these governments grant nothing unearned to any hobgoblin, and only those who show an aptitude for more advanced knowledge are given access to it. The young are considered fully trained junior soldiers as young as 14 years old, while some receive secondary education to become technicians, spies, or engineers at 16 years old.

Hobgoblins are believed to have originated on lost Golarion. When the Gap ended, though, hobgoblins already dwelled in numerous solar systems, which suggests that they might have engaged in dangerous generation-ship or suspendedanimation expeditions of expansion, or that they had access to powerful interstellar transportation magic.

While many societies were confused and shaken by the Gap, the disparate and widespread hobgoblin nations were almost entirely unaffected by it, and in some cases grew even stronger due to its amnesic effects. When the Gap ended, all hobgoblins still knew their own names and those of their superiors, their military rank and position, that they had earned those ranks through merit, and that their superiors had similarly earned their positions. This formed a strong common attitude that allowed many hobgoblin groups to work together, taking advantage of the confusion and consternation of their neighbors to wage quick, brutal wars of expansion against regions still coming to grips with the Gap.

Additionally, most hobgoblin societies and groups immediately analyzed such things as their religions and social codes, and discarded anything that did not immediately make sense. For example, many hobgoblin societies found they had strict rules forbidding the pursuit of spellcasting knowledge and the use of magic, but this prohibition seemed needlessly limiting after the Gap. Similarly, many hobgoblin groups saw no advantage in worshiping their old gods. For example, many hobgoblin mercenary companies who work for the Veskarium have adopted the worship of Damoritosh.

However, other ancient prohibitions remain to this day, though their origins are lost to the Gap. Whenever hobgoblins and elves first encountered one another in the years after the Gap, violence invariably ensued. Individual hobgoblins sometimes have no special hatred of elves, but for most of the race, elves are reviled and mistrusted creatures not even fit for use as slave labor.

A typical hobgoblin is 5 feet tall and weighs 160 pounds.

Hobgoblin Trooper

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 400

LE Medium humanoid (goblinoid)

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +5

Defense

HP: 20

EAC: 11 KAC: 13, +1 vs. combat maneuvers

Fort: +3 Ref: +5 Will: +1

Offense

Speed: 30 ft. (25 ft. in armor)

Melee: standard taclash +5 (1d4+3 S nonlethal)

Ranged: azimuth laser rifle +8 (1d8+1 F; critical burn 1d6) or stickybomb grenade I +8 (explode [10ft., entangled 2d4 rounds, DC 10])

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +4 Con: +1 Wis: +0 Int: +0 Cha: +1

Skills: Athletics +5, Intimidate +5, Stealth +10

Languages: Common, Goblin

Gear: lashunta ringwear I, azimuth laser rifle with 2 batteries (20 charges each), standard taclash, stickybomb grenades I (2)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, advance unit (3–6 plus 1

Special Abilities

Battle Hardened (Ex) Hobgoblins are trained for combat from an early age, and they quickly learn that a foe can do much more than just hurt you. Hobgoblins gain a +1 racial bonus to AC against combat maneuvers.

Description

Hobgoblins are a militant and merciless species that organizes quickly, reproduces rapidly, and adapts well to changing conditions. They are similar in appearance to goblins but are significantly taller and more muscled. While goblins are anarchic and gleefully destructive, though, hobgoblins are highly ordered and do nothing without a purpose.

Most hobgoblin societies are paramilitary states, with no distinction between the government and the chain of command. They can be as small as a single starship crew or as large as a conquered world. However, these governments grant nothing unearned to any hobgoblin, and only those who show an aptitude for more advanced knowledge are given access to it. The young are considered fully trained junior soldiers as young as 14 years old, while some receive secondary education to become technicians, spies, or engineers at 16 years old.

Hobgoblins are believed to have originated on lost Golarion. When the Gap ended, though, hobgoblins already dwelled in numerous solar systems, which suggests that they might have engaged in dangerous generation-ship or suspendedanimation expeditions of expansion, or that they had access to powerful interstellar transportation magic.

While many societies were confused and shaken by the Gap, the disparate and widespread hobgoblin nations were almost entirely unaffected by it, and in some cases grew even stronger due to its amnesic effects. When the Gap ended, all hobgoblins still knew their own names and those of their superiors, their military rank and position, that they had earned those ranks through merit, and that their superiors had similarly earned their positions. This formed a strong common attitude that allowed many hobgoblin groups to work together, taking advantage of the confusion and consternation of their neighbors to wage quick, brutal wars of expansion against regions still coming to grips with the Gap.

Additionally, most hobgoblin societies and groups immediately analyzed such things as their religions and social codes, and discarded anything that did not immediately make sense. For example, many hobgoblin societies found they had strict rules forbidding the pursuit of spellcasting knowledge and the use of magic, but this prohibition seemed needlessly limiting after the Gap. Similarly, many hobgoblin groups saw no advantage in worshiping their old gods. For example, many hobgoblin mercenary companies who work for the Veskarium have adopted the worship of Damoritosh.

However, other ancient prohibitions remain to this day, though their origins are lost to the Gap. Whenever hobgoblins and elves first encountered one another in the years after the Gap, violence invariably ensued. Individual hobgoblins sometimes have no special hatred of elves, but for most of the race, elves are reviled and mistrusted creatures not even fit for use as slave labor.

A typical hobgoblin is 5 feet tall and weighs 160 pounds.

Huge Herd Animal

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 4 XP: 1,200

N Huge animal

Init.: +0 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 50

EAC: 16 KAC: 18

Fort: +9 Ref: +6 Will: +4

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: natural weapon +11 (1d6+9 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +0 Con: +3 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +15

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or herd (3–18)

Description

From the ruthigs of Castrovel to the wollipeds of Triaxus, herd animals are beasts that gather in social groups comprised entirely of creatures of the same species. Herding behavior allows animals to gather and move together for protection from predators. Most commonly, herd animals are herbivores or docile omnivores.

better represent fiercer animals, including aggressive herbivores and omnivores that may or may not move in groups of their own kind.

In the Pact Worlds, the most common herd animals are domesticated. When various species took to exploring and colonizing the stars, they brought their livestock with them. For instance, cattle, goats, and sheep can be found on Absalom Station, as well as on any world where humans have a significant presence. Herd animals in the Pact Worlds serve a variety of purposes in the various societies that cultivate and support them. Farmers and engineers commonly maintain groups of herd animals to harvest their meat, though keeping herd animals for their shorn fur to create textiles is a more sustainable practice. Other cultivators leverage herd animals as mounts or pack animals, and training these docile creatures can result in large profits for professionals who are particularly skilled in this pursuit.

More rarely, some xenobiologists even cultivate groups of herd animals for scientists and corporations who wish to stabilize wild planets’ ecosystems. In this case, interested parties might place large numbers of pack animals in foreign locales to help tame rampant vegetation growth or provide prey for a dying species of predator. The goal of such projects is almost always to improve a planet’s suitability for colonization, mining, or farming. However, this practice is often controversial among ethnobiologists, who argue that introducing large populations of non-native species in this manner produces harmful and unforeseen results more often than it aids environments.

The herd animals in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique herd animal, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, from antlers to hooves, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts (see page 138). Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

The ruthig is a mammal with six legs, padded feet with toenails, a long and thin neck, an extended jaw with flat teeth, a lengthy and rough tongue, and two pairs of eyes. Its shaggy fur is home to a plethora of algae and moss species, giving the ruthig a mottled green color useful as camouflage in the herbivore’s native woodlands. Wild ruthigs travel in grazing herds, which are less camouflaged during the birthing season when gray-furred young are born. People of Castrovel domesticate the beasts for their honey-sweet milk and succulent meat.

A ruthig is a Medium herd animal that is about 4 feet tall at the withers and 6 feet tall with its head raised high. On average, a ruthig weighs about 250 pounds. A ruthig can use its bludgeoning kick as a natural weapon, and it has camouflage when in forested terrain.

Huge Predator

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

N Huge animal

Init.: +2 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +14

Defense

HP: 105

EAC: 19 KAC: 21

Fort: +9 Ref: +7 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: natural weapon +16 (2d6+12 P or S)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +2 Con: +4 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +14

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or pack (3–8)

Description

From the vortex sharks of Kalo-Mahoi to the hoarbats of Verces’s Darkside, and from the dire tigers of Castrovel to the tremor worms of Akiton, predators abound in the Pact Worlds and on planets across the galaxy. What unites these disparate species is that their diets include the meat of other creatures and that they hunt and kill to acquire this food. On planets where sapient species are dominant, predators have learned that weapon-wielding creatures can be deadly prey. Other predators, deprived of such contact, often see sentient explorers as an unfamiliar form of potential sustenance, making confrontations inevitable.

Predators come in all shapes and sizes, limited only by the environment where they are found. Bigger predators rely on abundant food, cycles of inactivity, an omnivorous diet, or a combination of these. Smaller predators have fewer requirements and can be equally dangerous; even very small animals can evolve pack tactics to overwhelm larger and stronger creatures. Some of these swarms, such as the flying viper eels of Bretheda, strip flesh from bone as they move over and around prey.

The predators in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique predator, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, from claws to slams, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts. Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

The vortex shark is a slim, cartilaginous fish that lives in the depths of Kalo-Mahoi’s oceans. The creature is bioluminescent and has a four-part jaw with rows of hooked teeth. A vortex shark’s natural weapon is a bite that deals slashing damage, has the bleed 1d6 critical hit effect, and allows the shark’s teeth to grab ahold of a target. The female of the species grows larger than the male and lays eggs in pouches she leaves behind. Young fend for themselves when they hatch, catching weaker siblings for a first meal. An adult vortex shark is a Large aquatic predator, averaging 12 feet in length and 1,000 pounds in weight. The sharks can breathe only water and have a land speed of 0 feet and a swim speed of 60 feet. Living in Kalo-Mahoi’s seas has inured them to cold (resistance 5 to cold), and they have blindsense (scent) out to 30 feet and the tracking (scent) special ability for waterborne prey, which they use mostly to hunt bleeding creatures.

Ja Noi

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 5 XP: 1,600

LE Medium outsider (goblinoid)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +11

Defense

HP: 84

EAC: 17 KAC: 19

Fort: +7 Ref: +7 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 30 ft. (25 ft. in armor)

Melee: tactical swoop hammer +15 (1d10+10 B; critical knockdown)

Ranged: thunderstrike sonic rifle +12 (1d10+5 So; critical deafen [DC 13])

Offensive Abilities:

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +3 Con: +2 Wis: +0 Int: +1 Cha: +1

Skills: Acrobatics +16, Intimidate +11, Stealth +11

Languages: Common, Goblin

Gear: lashunta ringwear II, tactical swoop hammer, thunderstrike sonic rifle with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, patrol (2–4), or warband (5–7 plus 8–15 hobgoblin troopers)

Special Abilities

Serene Fighter (Ex) A ja noi is an experienced combatant and can remain calm even in the face of great adversity. Once per day, a ja noi can reroll a Will saving throw.

Description

Oni are a race of malevolent spirits given physical form. Most oni begin their existence as kami, spirits tasked with the protection of a specific part of the natural world, but for some reason reject their duties and turn to evil. Less often, the souls of particularly vile mortals can become oni upon death. When oni first form, they are intangible, powerless spirits. In places with strong connections to evil, or as a result of unspeakable rituals, these formless spirits can gain physical bodies drawn from a humanoid species, often one predisposed to war— though their spiritual origins also give them the power to shapeshift. There are known to be oni that resemble drow, humans, giants, shirrens, and vesk, but among the most common oni are the ja noi, who have ties to the violent and militarist race of hobgoblins.

Ja noi are distinct from hobgoblins in appearance due to their bright-red color, prominent ridges on their brow and forehead, a near-permanent facial grimace, and even greater size and muscular frames. Ja noi stand over 6 feet tall and weigh roughly 220 pounds. A ja noi is particularly driven to experience the sensations of battle, actively seeking to lead armies and build empires. Ja noi fight in close combat if possible, and while perfectly capable of reveling in victory won with starships and huge fighting machines, they take every opportunity to lead infantry assaults and fight in face-to-face confrontations. Ja noi often gather hobgoblin soldiers to fulfill their need to command troops. For their part, hobgoblins normally embrace the presence of a ja noi within their ranks, seeing them as among the most perfect expressions of the hobgoblin form and treating them as mighty heroes.

Some hobgoblin groups interact so closely with ja noi that children are sometimes born to one ja noi parent and one hobgoblin parent. Known as kanabo, a term that means “the strongest,” these oni-blooded goblinoids breed true with both ja noi and other goblinoids. They have innate powers that often make them champions of their people, though they also often develop an independent streak that causes them to reject hobgoblin rules and society. Kanabo share the size of their oni ancestors, but their appearance is much more variable, ranging from stout hobgoblins to forms closer to half-orcs, and some even appear nearly human. The average kanabo is over 6 feet tall and weighs 250 pounds.

Juvenile Nyssholora

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 4 XP: 1,200

N Large magical (beast)

Init.: +0 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision, telepathy sense 60 ft. Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 50

EAC: 16 KAC: 18

Fort: +8 Ref: +3 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: bite +13 (1d6+9 P) or phasic claws +13 (1d4+9 So) or tail scourge +13 (1d4+9 E)

Offensive Abilities: breath weapon (15-ft. cone, 4d6 So [see text], Reflex DC 13 half, usable every 1d6 rounds)

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +0 Con: +3 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +15

Ecology

Environment: temperate or warm plains (Castrovel)

Organization: solitary, pair, or pack (3–6)

Special Abilities

Breath Weapon (Su) A creature that fails its saving throw against the breath weapon is also staggered for 1 round. This breath weapon ignores an object’s hardness.

Phasic Claws (Su) A nyssholora’s claws ignore half an object’s hardness.

Telepathy Sense (Su)

Description

Among the most feared and deadly apex predators on Castrovel, a nyssholora is a dinosaur-like monster that stalks the wilderness across both Asana and the Colonies. These fearless hunters eat whatever they can catch and kill. They have plagued lashuntas and formians enough to figure prominently in the mythology of both species for millennia.

A nyssholora resembles a tyrannosaur, standing on its hind legs and counterbalancing its massive head with a long, muscular tail. A nyssholora has a pair of upper appendages with claws that resemble scythe blades, as well as a smaller pair of similar arms the creature uses to mark its territory and communicate its location to offspring, hunting partners, or a mate. A wide maw filled with two rows of fangs dominates the creature’s head, and eight beady eyes run in two vertical rows along the bridge of its nose. A wide, flat crest tops its skull, behind which writhe a mass of short, smooth tentacles. A smaller bundle of tentacles tips the nyssholora’s tail. These tentacles serve two purposes. First, the nyssholora uses them to collect energy from the atmosphere. Second, they aid the nyssholora in sensing the presence of telepathic prey, including formians and lashuntas. Stealth in the plains is all but impossible for a creature the size of a nyssholora, and it makes little effort to camouflage itself, sporting bright neon striations of yellow and orange across its thick purple or pink hide.

Nyssholoras nest and lay eggs, and both parents keep watch over unhatched young in the treacherous Castrovelian wilderness. Brooding nyssholoras are particularly aggressive, due to hunger and the desire to protect their offspring. When young nyssholoras hatch, they remain in the nest for only a day. They then stay near a parent, learning how to hunt. Juvenile nyssholoras become more and more independent over the course of a month and then set out on their own or in small groups that typically end up breaking up a couple months later. Adult nyssholoras have been known to respond to distress calls of their own offspring up to a year after separation.

The people of Castrovel hunt nyssholoras to keep their numbers down. Big-game hunters collect the beasts’ phasic claws, the third segment of the creature’s forearms. These bladed talons are sharp, but their real danger is that they vibrate at ultrasonic speeds, creating a blade of concentrated sound waves that precedes the physical structure of the claw as it swipes through the air. This can cut through even extremely dense materials. Because of these adaptations, Castrovelian scientists have long believed that nyssholoras evolved to hunt prey that had both telepathy and preternaturally strong armor. This hypothetical prey has long since vanished from Castrovel, but the nyssholora, lacking predators to challenge its position at the top of the food chain, has remained. More than one nyssholora has used its talons to carve open vehicle hulls or cut into city walls to get at prey.

Similarly, the volume and force with which a nyssholora releases its low, resonant roar are enough to weaken the structural integrity of buildings and concuss the bodies of other creatures. This mighty bellow offers potential prey an early warning to the beast’s approach since, in the absence of overwhelming ambient noise, a nyssholora’s cry can be heard as far as 20 miles away. The beast’s roar is so iconic that an entire genre of loud, growling music popular among korasha lashuntas adopted its name—originally as an insult from the style’s detractors, but quickly embraced by fans. Nyssholoran roar performances can be heard in counterculture hot spots throughout the Pact Worlds.

In its horizontal walking pose, an adult nyssholora is 15 feet tall at the hip but can stand upright to over 20 feet. The typical adult nyssholora stretches as much as 40 feet from the tip of its tail to its nose and weighs 15 tons, although formian and lashunta legends tell of epic specimens two or three times recorded sizes. Juvenile nyssholoras are less than half the size and weigh almost 2 tons.

Juvenile Solar Wisp

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 5 XP: 1,600

N Huge outsider (air)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +11

Defense

HP: 63

EAC: 17 KAC: 19

Fort: +9 Ref: +7 Will: +4

Offense

Speed: fly 30 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: slam +15 (1d6+8 F)

Offensive Abilities: engulf (1d6+8 F, DC 13)

Statistics

Str: +3 Dex: +5 Con: +2 Wis: +0 Int: -3 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +16 (+24 to fly)

Ecology

Environment: temperate or warm land or vacuum

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Aglow (Ex)

Description

Life exists in myriad forms across the universe, dwelling everywhere from the vast depths of space to the heart of a star—and the places in between. Solar wisps are blobs of ejecta from a sun’s corona that have taken on a modicum of sentience. No one is exactly sure how solar wisps originate, though some believe it is Sarenrae’s divine will, while others point toward a consciousness similar to that of elementals, claiming that solar wisps are nothing more than cousins of fire elementals. But while it is true solar wisps are amorphous orbs of burning plasma with almost animal-level intelligence, the similarities end there. These creatures have a long and unique life cycle that begins in a star and can end in calamity.

When a solar wisp is “born,” it measures about 20 feet in diameter, but the material of its being is loosely held together by minor gravitational forces. At this point, a solar wisp isn’t much more than a red-hot cloud of colloidal matter. Driven by instinct, the solar wisp attaches itself to a nearby fast-moving celestial body (usually a comet), which eventually takes it close to a planet or moon containing the minerals on which the solar wisp feeds. As it burns its way across such a landscape, the solar wisp gains more mass but shrinks in size. Responding to unknown stimuli, the solar wisp launches itself back into space to latch onto another comet or meteor to repeat the process.

As a solar wisp feeds and ages, it increases in density but decreases in diameter. Despite its reduction in size to a mere few feet in diameter, a mature solar wisp burns with far greater intensity and is much more dangerous than a juvenile. A solar wisp of any age and size can pose a threat, however, as it is unwavering in its pursuit of food, consuming the minerals it seeks out in its internal furnace. This can be a destructive process that puts it in conflict with other species—especially if those species also rely on the same minerals for economic stability. Most creatures that attempt to stop a mature solar wisp underestimate its abilities thanks to its small size. Its effects on local gravity and its intense heat mean that most who confront a solar wisp are lucky if they get away with only severe burns.

Though it has a life span measured in centuries—and sometimes multiple thousands of years—a solar wisp does eventually die. An elderly solar wisp is a tiny ball that burns like a nuclear explosion, and when it expires, it implodes into a gravitational singularity that affects a half-mile radius. Though this miniature black hole lasts for less than an hour, it poses a great danger to those caught in its pull. A recent report from Near Space tells of an entire nascent colony wiped out by a dying solar wisp that, until then, had served as a kind of mascot and beacon for the unfortunate settlers.

In their travels, solar wisps sometimes shed portions of themselves, which cool rapidly into a glittering stream of beautiful bright-orange jewels called

that are used throughout the Pact Worlds (and beyond) as naturally occurring solarian weapon crystals. A few small starship crews make a dangerous living by following wisps— at a great distance—and waiting for this molting, scooping up the resulting jewels until their cargo holds are full, and then returning to a safer location to sort them by quality. Despite the danger inherent in collecting the gems, these solarian weapon crystals are widely available, especially in the sun’s Burning Archipelago in the Pact Worlds; aboard the kasathan worldship the

; and in Fullbright, Verces’s scorched, sun-facing hemisphere.

Kanabo Commando

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 3 XP: 800

LE Medium outsider (goblinoid)

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +8

Defense

HP: 40

EAC: 15 KAC: 18

Fort: +5 Ref: +5 Will: +4

Offense

Speed: 30 ft. (20 ft. in armor)

Melee: carbon steel curveblade +12 (1d10+7 S; critical bleed 1d6)

Ranged: autotarget rifle +9 (1d6+3 P) or flash grenade I +9 (explode [5 ft., blinded 1d4 rounds, DC 12])

Offensive Abilities: fighting styles (arcane assailant)

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +2 Con: +1 Wis: +0 Int: +0 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +13, Intimidate +8, Stealth +8

Languages: Common, Goblin

Gear: golemforged plating II, autotarget rifle with 50 longarm rounds, carbon steel curveblade, flash grenades I (2)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, strike vanguard (1 with 2–12 hobgoblin troopers), or elite squad (2–5)

Special Abilities

Armor Savant (Ex) Kanabo have an innate mastery of the use of armor. When wearing armor, they gain a +1 racial bonus to AC. When wearing heavy armor, their armor check penalty is 1 less severe than normal.

Description

Oni are a race of malevolent spirits given physical form. Most oni begin their existence as kami, spirits tasked with the protection of a specific part of the natural world, but for some reason reject their duties and turn to evil. Less often, the souls of particularly vile mortals can become oni upon death. When oni first form, they are intangible, powerless spirits. In places with strong connections to evil, or as a result of unspeakable rituals, these formless spirits can gain physical bodies drawn from a humanoid species, often one predisposed to war— though their spiritual origins also give them the power to shapeshift. There are known to be oni that resemble drow, humans, giants, shirrens, and vesk, but among the most common oni are the ja noi, who have ties to the violent and militarist race of

.

Ja noi are distinct from hobgoblins in appearance due to their bright-red color, prominent ridges on their brow and forehead, a near-permanent facial grimace, and even greater size and muscular frames. Ja noi stand over 6 feet tall and weigh roughly 220 pounds. A ja noi is particularly driven to experience the sensations of battle, actively seeking to lead armies and build empires. Ja noi fight in close combat if possible, and while perfectly capable of reveling in victory won with starships and huge fighting machines, they take every opportunity to lead infantry assaults and fight in face-to-face confrontations. Ja noi often gather hobgoblin soldiers to fulfill their need to command troops. For their part, hobgoblins normally embrace the presence of a ja noi within their ranks, seeing them as among the most perfect expressions of the hobgoblin form and treating them as mighty heroes.

Some hobgoblin groups interact so closely with ja noi that children are sometimes born to one ja noi parent and one hobgoblin parent. Known as kanabo, a term that means “the strongest,” these oni-blooded goblinoids breed true with both ja noi and other goblinoids. They have innate powers that often make them champions of their people, though they also often develop an independent streak that causes them to reject hobgoblin rules and society. Kanabo share the size of their oni ancestors, but their appearance is much more variable, ranging from stout hobgoblins to forms closer to half-orcs, and some even appear nearly human. The average kanabo is over 6 feet tall and weighs 250 pounds.

Large Herd Animal

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 2 XP: 600

N Large animal

Init.: +2 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +7

Defense

HP: 25

EAC: 13 KAC: 15

Fort: +6 Ref: +6 Will: +1

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: natural weapon +9 (1d6+5 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +3 Dex: +2 Con: +2 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +7

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or herd (3–30)

Description

From the ruthigs of Castrovel to the wollipeds of Triaxus, herd animals are beasts that gather in social groups comprised entirely of creatures of the same species. Herding behavior allows animals to gather and move together for protection from predators. Most commonly, herd animals are herbivores or docile omnivores.

better represent fiercer animals, including aggressive herbivores and omnivores that may or may not move in groups of their own kind.

In the Pact Worlds, the most common herd animals are domesticated. When various species took to exploring and colonizing the stars, they brought their livestock with them. For instance, cattle, goats, and sheep can be found on Absalom Station, as well as on any world where humans have a significant presence. Herd animals in the Pact Worlds serve a variety of purposes in the various societies that cultivate and support them. Farmers and engineers commonly maintain groups of herd animals to harvest their meat, though keeping herd animals for their shorn fur to create textiles is a more sustainable practice. Other cultivators leverage herd animals as mounts or pack animals, and training these docile creatures can result in large profits for professionals who are particularly skilled in this pursuit.

More rarely, some xenobiologists even cultivate groups of herd animals for scientists and corporations who wish to stabilize wild planets’ ecosystems. In this case, interested parties might place large numbers of pack animals in foreign locales to help tame rampant vegetation growth or provide prey for a dying species of predator. The goal of such projects is almost always to improve a planet’s suitability for colonization, mining, or farming. However, this practice is often controversial among ethnobiologists, who argue that introducing large populations of non-native species in this manner produces harmful and unforeseen results more often than it aids environments.

The herd animals in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique herd animal, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, from antlers to hooves, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts (see page 138). Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

The ruthig is a mammal with six legs, padded feet with toenails, a long and thin neck, an extended jaw with flat teeth, a lengthy and rough tongue, and two pairs of eyes. Its shaggy fur is home to a plethora of algae and moss species, giving the ruthig a mottled green color useful as camouflage in the herbivore’s native woodlands. Wild ruthigs travel in grazing herds, which are less camouflaged during the birthing season when gray-furred young are born. People of Castrovel domesticate the beasts for their honey-sweet milk and succulent meat.

A ruthig is a Medium herd animal that is about 4 feet tall at the withers and 6 feet tall with its head raised high. On average, a ruthig weighs about 250 pounds. A ruthig can use its bludgeoning kick as a natural weapon, and it has camouflage when in forested terrain.

Large Predator

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 4 XP: 1,200

N Large animal

Init.: +2 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 50

EAC: 16 KAC: 18

Fort: +6 Ref: +6 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: natural weapon +11 (1d8+7 P or S)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +2 Con: +2 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +10

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or pack (3–12)

Description

From the vortex sharks of Kalo-Mahoi to the hoarbats of Verces’s Darkside, and from the dire tigers of Castrovel to the tremor worms of Akiton, predators abound in the Pact Worlds and on planets across the galaxy. What unites these disparate species is that their diets include the meat of other creatures and that they hunt and kill to acquire this food. On planets where sapient species are dominant, predators have learned that weapon-wielding creatures can be deadly prey. Other predators, deprived of such contact, often see sentient explorers as an unfamiliar form of potential sustenance, making confrontations inevitable.

Predators come in all shapes and sizes, limited only by the environment where they are found. Bigger predators rely on abundant food, cycles of inactivity, an omnivorous diet, or a combination of these. Smaller predators have fewer requirements and can be equally dangerous; even very small animals can evolve pack tactics to overwhelm larger and stronger creatures. Some of these swarms, such as the flying viper eels of Bretheda, strip flesh from bone as they move over and around prey.

The predators in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique predator, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, from claws to slams, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts. Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

The vortex shark is a slim, cartilaginous fish that lives in the depths of Kalo-Mahoi’s oceans. The creature is bioluminescent and has a four-part jaw with rows of hooked teeth. A vortex shark’s natural weapon is a bite that deals slashing damage, has the bleed 1d6 critical hit effect, and allows the shark’s teeth to grab ahold of a target. The female of the species grows larger than the male and lays eggs in pouches she leaves behind. Young fend for themselves when they hatch, catching weaker siblings for a first meal. An adult vortex shark is a Large aquatic predator, averaging 12 feet in length and 1,000 pounds in weight. The sharks can breathe only water and have a land speed of 0 feet and a swim speed of 60 feet. Living in Kalo-Mahoi’s seas has inured them to cold (resistance 5 to cold), and they have blindsense (scent) out to 30 feet and the tracking (scent) special ability for waterborne prey, which they use mostly to hunt bleeding creatures.

Living Apocalypse

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 20 XP: 307,200

CE Colossal ooze

Init.: +12 Senses: blindsight (wireless signal) 60 ft., sense through (blindsight) 60 ft., sightless Perception: +34

Defense

HP: 405

EAC: 34 KAC: 35

Fort: +19 Ref: +15 Will: +20

Offense

Speed: 60 ft., fly 60 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: None

Ranged: apocalypse beam +30 (12d6+20 B plus radioactive exposure)

Offensive Abilities: radioactive, radioactive exposure

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +12 Con: +6 Wis: +4 Int:Cha: +9

Skills: Acrobatics +34 (+42 to fly), Intimidate +39, Mysticism +39 (to identify spells and other magic effects only)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Apocalypse Beam (Ex) As an attack, a living apocalypse can blast a target with a focused beam of radiation. This beam has a range increment of 120 feet.

Broadcast (Ex) A living apocalypse can receive and transmit wireless signals as if it had a system-wide comm unit; this also grants the creature its blindsight and sense through abilities. Though a living apocalypse cannot understand or speak any language, it is capable of remembering complex broadcasts it has received and repeating them, though often in a jumbled order or in short snippets, which it sometimes does in an attempt to lure creatures closer to it. A creature attempting to determine the nature of a living apocalypse’s broadcast must succeed at a DC 45 Engineering or Sense Motive check, or it misinterprets the signal as an improvised distress call.

Destructive Intuition (Ex) A living apocalypse has an intuitive understanding of magical energy and its own spell-like abilities, despite its otherwise mindless nature. A living apocalypse has a +39 bonus to Mysticism checks to identify spells and other magic effects.

Pure Energy (Ex) A living apocalypse subsists on pure energy that it creates, making it self-sufficient. It does not age, and it does not need to breathe, eat, or sleep. It can survive extremes of cold, heat, pressure, and even the vacuum of outer space.

Radioactive (Ex) The area within 20 feet of a living apocalypse is suffused with high radiation. The area within 20 to 40 feet is suffused with medium radiation, and the area within 40 to 60 feet is suffused with low radiation. If a living apocalypse stays within a 1-square-mile area for 24 hours, that area becomes suffused with low radiation for as long as the living apocalypse stayed there, even after the creature leaves. If it stays in such an area for 2 days or longer, the area becomes suffused with medium radiation for as long as the living apocalypse was there, which then downgrades to low radiation that lasts for the same duration. If a living apocalypse stays in such an area for a week or more, the area becomes suffused with high radiation, which downgrades to medium and then low radiation after time periods equal to the time the living apocalypse was in the area.

Radioactive Exposure (Ex) A creature struck by the apocalypse beam of a living apocalypse must succeed at a DC 27 Fortitude save or treat all areas of radiation as being one level stronger (from no radiation to low radiation, low to medium, medium to high, or high to severe) for 1 round.

Description

The horrific creature known as a living apocalypse is created when the most powerful destructive energies known to the galaxy are unleashed without constraint or limitation, especially in acts of malice or as a result of criminal negligence. A living apocalypse can be the result of powerful energy generators melting down, the use of doomsday weapons, or even magic experimentation gone horribly awry. The creature is driven by an instinctive need to destroy, and it often takes the form of a massive cloud of impenetrable oily smoke, lit from within by pulsing bolts of green radioactive discharge. A living apocalypse is drawn to high concentrations of life and complex structures, from vibrant rainforests to bustling cities, and attacks them without warning or remorse. Though mindless, a living apocalypse is driven by a supernatural force of anarchic evil to enact ruin. It has been suggested that a living apocalypse is an agent of the Devourer, but even if this is true, Devourer cultists are incapable of intentionally creating or controlling them. Some lifeless worlds are the burned-out remains of civilizations that created a living apocalypse and were totally destroyed by it.

As a creature that is infused with incredible destructive energies, a living apocalypse commands energy rays of pure radioactive force and powerful magic abilities it can employ with instinctual cunning. Though it is unable to form complex plans or comprehend complex chains of cause and effect, a living apocalypse is able to apply its ability to manipulate energy to deal with immediate threats with what seem like carefully considered tactics. Once a living apocalypse is unleashed in a region, it destroys everything in its path until there is not a complex structure or significant life-form left within hundreds of miles. Because it is mindless, the ooze follows a path dictated by what it can sense at any given moment. If it can’t detect anything nearby, it settles in one place, using its broadcast ability both to listen for wireless signals and to send signals out in the hopes of drawing in more victims.

When there is nothing left to destroy and no change for centuries, a living apocalypse eventually goes into a dormant state, often at the bottom of a chasm or within the stormiest region of a world, waiting for centuries for someone to find it. A typical living apocalypse is 30 feet in diameter and weighs 187 tons.

Mature Solar Wisp

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 19 XP: 204,800

N Small outsider (air)

Init.: +11 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +32

Aura: gravitational pull aura (120 ft.)

Defense

HP: 400

EAC: 34 KAC: 35

Fort: +22 Ref: +20 Will: +16

Offense

Speed: fly 60 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: slam +31 (15d6+28 F)

Ranged: solar ray +34 (8d8+19 F; critical burn 6d6)

Offensive Abilities: conflagration, stellar heat

Statistics

Str: +9 Dex: +11 Con: +6 Wis: +0 Int: -3 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +37 (+45 to fly)

Ecology

Environment: temperate or warm land or vacuum

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Aglow (Ex) A solar wisp increases the light level by one step out to a radius of 10 feet × half the solar wisp’s CR.

Conflagration (Ex) Once every 1d4 rounds as a standard action, a mature solar wisp can hurl a portion of its burning form at a grid intersection within 120 feet, at which point the flames detonate, dealing 10d6 fire damage to all creatures within a 20-foot-radius burst. An affected creature can attempt a DC 24 Reflex saving throw to halve the damage.

Gravitational Pull Aura (Ex) A creature within 120 feet of a mature solar wisp has its speed reduced by half when it moves away from the solar wisp, and can move at double its speed when moving toward the solar wisp.

Solar Ray (Ex) A mature solar wisp can project an intense ray of light as a ranged attack against a target within 240 feet.

Stellar Heat (Ex)

Description

Life exists in myriad forms across the universe, dwelling everywhere from the vast depths of space to the heart of a star—and the places in between. Solar wisps are blobs of ejecta from a sun’s corona that have taken on a modicum of sentience. No one is exactly sure how solar wisps originate, though some believe it is Sarenrae’s divine will, while others point toward a consciousness similar to that of elementals, claiming that solar wisps are nothing more than cousins of fire elementals. But while it is true solar wisps are amorphous orbs of burning plasma with almost animal-level intelligence, the similarities end there. These creatures have a long and unique life cycle that begins in a star and can end in calamity.

When a solar wisp is “born,” it measures about 20 feet in diameter, but the material of its being is loosely held together by minor gravitational forces. At this point, a solar wisp isn’t much more than a red-hot cloud of colloidal matter. Driven by instinct, the solar wisp attaches itself to a nearby fast-moving celestial body (usually a comet), which eventually takes it close to a planet or moon containing the minerals on which the solar wisp feeds. As it burns its way across such a landscape, the solar wisp gains more mass but shrinks in size. Responding to unknown stimuli, the solar wisp launches itself back into space to latch onto another comet or meteor to repeat the process.

As a solar wisp feeds and ages, it increases in density but decreases in diameter. Despite its reduction in size to a mere few feet in diameter, a mature solar wisp burns with far greater intensity and is much more dangerous than a juvenile. A solar wisp of any age and size can pose a threat, however, as it is unwavering in its pursuit of food, consuming the minerals it seeks out in its internal furnace. This can be a destructive process that puts it in conflict with other species—especially if those species also rely on the same minerals for economic stability. Most creatures that attempt to stop a mature solar wisp underestimate its abilities thanks to its small size. Its effects on local gravity and its intense heat mean that most who confront a solar wisp are lucky if they get away with only severe burns.

Though it has a life span measured in centuries—and sometimes multiple thousands of years—a solar wisp does eventually die. An elderly solar wisp is a tiny ball that burns like a nuclear explosion, and when it expires, it implodes into a gravitational singularity that affects a half-mile radius. Though this miniature black hole lasts for less than an hour, it poses a great danger to those caught in its pull. A recent report from Near Space tells of an entire nascent colony wiped out by a dying solar wisp that, until then, had served as a kind of mascot and beacon for the unfortunate settlers.

In their travels, solar wisps sometimes shed portions of themselves, which cool rapidly into a glittering stream of beautiful bright-orange jewels called

that are used throughout the Pact Worlds (and beyond) as naturally occurring solarian weapon crystals. A few small starship crews make a dangerous living by following wisps— at a great distance—and waiting for this molting, scooping up the resulting jewels until their cargo holds are full, and then returning to a safer location to sort them by quality. Despite the danger inherent in collecting the gems, these solarian weapon crystals are widely available, especially in the sun’s Burning Archipelago in the Pact Worlds; aboard the kasathan worldship the

; and in Fullbright, Verces’s scorched, sun-facing hemisphere.

Medium Herd Animal

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 200

N Medium animal

Init.: +2 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +4

Defense

HP: 13

EAC: 10 KAC: 12

Fort: +3 Ref: +4 Will: +1

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: natural weapon +4 (1d6+1 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +2 Con: +1 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +4

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or herd (3–30)

Description

From the ruthigs of Castrovel to the wollipeds of Triaxus, herd animals are beasts that gather in social groups comprised entirely of creatures of the same species. Herding behavior allows animals to gather and move together for protection from predators. Most commonly, herd animals are herbivores or docile omnivores.

better represent fiercer animals, including aggressive herbivores and omnivores that may or may not move in groups of their own kind.

In the Pact Worlds, the most common herd animals are domesticated. When various species took to exploring and colonizing the stars, they brought their livestock with them. For instance, cattle, goats, and sheep can be found on Absalom Station, as well as on any world where humans have a significant presence. Herd animals in the Pact Worlds serve a variety of purposes in the various societies that cultivate and support them. Farmers and engineers commonly maintain groups of herd animals to harvest their meat, though keeping herd animals for their shorn fur to create textiles is a more sustainable practice. Other cultivators leverage herd animals as mounts or pack animals, and training these docile creatures can result in large profits for professionals who are particularly skilled in this pursuit.

More rarely, some xenobiologists even cultivate groups of herd animals for scientists and corporations who wish to stabilize wild planets’ ecosystems. In this case, interested parties might place large numbers of pack animals in foreign locales to help tame rampant vegetation growth or provide prey for a dying species of predator. The goal of such projects is almost always to improve a planet’s suitability for colonization, mining, or farming. However, this practice is often controversial among ethnobiologists, who argue that introducing large populations of non-native species in this manner produces harmful and unforeseen results more often than it aids environments.

The herd animals in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique herd animal, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, from antlers to hooves, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts (see page 138). Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

The ruthig is a mammal with six legs, padded feet with toenails, a long and thin neck, an extended jaw with flat teeth, a lengthy and rough tongue, and two pairs of eyes. Its shaggy fur is home to a plethora of algae and moss species, giving the ruthig a mottled green color useful as camouflage in the herbivore’s native woodlands. Wild ruthigs travel in grazing herds, which are less camouflaged during the birthing season when gray-furred young are born. People of Castrovel domesticate the beasts for their honey-sweet milk and succulent meat.

A ruthig is a Medium herd animal that is about 4 feet tall at the withers and 6 feet tall with its head raised high. On average, a ruthig weighs about 250 pounds. A ruthig can use its bludgeoning kick as a natural weapon, and it has camouflage when in forested terrain.

Medium Predator

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 400

N Medium animal

Init.: +2 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +5

Defense

HP: 20

EAC: 11 KAC: 13

Fort: +3 Ref: +3 Will: +1

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: natural weapon +7 (1d6+2 P or S)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +2 Con: +2 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Acrobatics +5, Athletics +5, Stealth +5

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or pack (3–12)

Description

From the vortex sharks of Kalo-Mahoi to the hoarbats of Verces’s Darkside, and from the dire tigers of Castrovel to the tremor worms of Akiton, predators abound in the Pact Worlds and on planets across the galaxy. What unites these disparate species is that their diets include the meat of other creatures and that they hunt and kill to acquire this food. On planets where sapient species are dominant, predators have learned that weapon-wielding creatures can be deadly prey. Other predators, deprived of such contact, often see sentient explorers as an unfamiliar form of potential sustenance, making confrontations inevitable.

Predators come in all shapes and sizes, limited only by the environment where they are found. Bigger predators rely on abundant food, cycles of inactivity, an omnivorous diet, or a combination of these. Smaller predators have fewer requirements and can be equally dangerous; even very small animals can evolve pack tactics to overwhelm larger and stronger creatures. Some of these swarms, such as the flying viper eels of Bretheda, strip flesh from bone as they move over and around prey.

The predators in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique predator, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, from claws to slams, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts. Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

The vortex shark is a slim, cartilaginous fish that lives in the depths of Kalo-Mahoi’s oceans. The creature is bioluminescent and has a four-part jaw with rows of hooked teeth. A vortex shark’s natural weapon is a bite that deals slashing damage, has the bleed 1d6 critical hit effect, and allows the shark’s teeth to grab ahold of a target. The female of the species grows larger than the male and lays eggs in pouches she leaves behind. Young fend for themselves when they hatch, catching weaker siblings for a first meal. An adult vortex shark is a Large aquatic predator, averaging 12 feet in length and 1,000 pounds in weight. The sharks can breathe only water and have a land speed of 0 feet and a swim speed of 60 feet. Living in Kalo-Mahoi’s seas has inured them to cold (resistance 5 to cold), and they have blindsense (scent) out to 30 feet and the tracking (scent) special ability for waterborne prey, which they use mostly to hunt bleeding creatures.

Mi-Go High Priest

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 11 XP: 12,800

NE Medium plant

Init.: +3 Senses: blindsight (vibration) 30 ft., low-light vision Perception: +20

Defense

HP: 155 RP: 5

EAC: 23 KAC: 24

Fort: +12 Ref: +10 Will: +14

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 50 ft. (Su, average)

Melee: claw +19 (2d10+12 S plus grab)

Ranged: mi-go hailstorm-class zero pistol +19 (2d6+13 C; critical staggered [DC 20])

Offensive Abilities: evisceration

Spells Known: Known

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +3 Con: +2 Wis: +8 Int: +5 Cha: +1

Skills: Acrobatics +20, Bluff +25, Life Science +20, Medicine +20, Mysticism +25

Languages: Aklo, Common, Mi-Go

Gear: mi-go hailstorm-class zero pistol with 2 mi-go high-capacity batteries (40 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, cult (1 plus 3.9 mi.go), or invasion (1.4 plus 6.15 mi-go)

Special Abilities

Evisceration (Ex) A mi-go is capable of performing swift surgical operations upon targets that are helpless or that the mi-go currently has grappled. Against such a target, any hit with the mi-go’s claw counts as a critical hit that has the severe wound critical hit effect with a save DC of 20. If the mi-go actually scores a critical hit against such a target, the mi-go rolls the damage three times instead of twice, and the save DC increases to 22.

Mi-Go Technology (Ex)

Description

Mi-go are scientists, explorers, inventors, and colonists, as well as eerie servitors of the Outer Gods and Great Old Ones. These creatures come from deep space and view the universe as a canvas to be controlled and mastered. Their population on any one planet varies, but when counted across the entire galaxy, their numbers are mind-numbing in scale.

Although a mi-go resembles an arthropod, the creature is actually a highly evolved form of fungus. Mi-go can speak in a buzzing voice, but their own language consists of the complex shifting of color patterns upon their bulbous heads. This communication allows for the dissemination of astounding amounts of information quickly, but for those other than mi-go, speaking the language requires special equipment.

Mi-go meld faith and science, magic and technology, and other themes together into an unsettling whole. Most mi-go serve Nyarlathotep or other entities of the Elder Mythos, and their minds work in a fashion alien to typical humanoid thinking. To migo, their devotion to their gods isn’t admiration, slavery, or worship—it’s akin to the relationship between a student and a professor.

Other minions of the Elder Mythos might be allies, but mi-go consider themselves to be superior to most living things. Gifted with supernatural skill in surgery and biotechnology, mi-go can rework the flesh of those they capture with precision, remaking their victims into forms more appropriate for servitude or for truly alien aesthetics. These alien fungi can also keep creatures alive through the most invasive surgical procedures, so those who fall prey to mi-go don’t retain their sanity for long. Using their technology and ability to squeeze into a tighter shape, mi-go construct cunning disguises, replacing those whose brains they’ve harvested in order to invade societies from within. Only the mi-go know the extent to which they’ve infiltrated societies throughout the galaxy. A mi-go is the size of a human but weighs only 90 pounds.

Mi-Go

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

NE Medium plant

Init.: +3 Senses: blindsight (vibration) 30 ft., low-light vision Perception: +13

Defense

HP: 80

EAC: 18 KAC: 19

Fort: +11 Ref: +5 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 50 ft. (Su, average)

Melee: claw +14 (1d6+7 S plus grab)

Ranged: mi-go frostbite-class zero rifle +14 (1d8+5 C; critical staggered [DC 16])

Offensive Abilities: evisceration

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +3 Con: +2 Wis: +2 Int: +5 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +13, Bluff +18, Engineering +13, Life Science +18, Medicine +13, Mysticism +18

Languages: Aklo, Common, Mi-Go

Gear: mi-go frostbite-class zero rifle with 2 mi-go high-capacity batteries (40 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or scouting party (3–9)

Special Abilities

Evisceration (Ex) A mi-go is capable of performing swift surgical operations upon targets that are helpless or that the mi-go currently has grappled. Against such a target, any hit with the mi-go’s claw counts as a critical hit that has the severe wound critical hit effect with a save DC of 16. If the mi-go actually scores a critical hit against such a target, the mi-go rolls the damage three times instead of twice, and the save DC increases to 18.

Mi-Go Technology (Ex)

Description

Mi-go are scientists, explorers, inventors, and colonists, as well as eerie servitors of the Outer Gods and Great Old Ones. These creatures come from deep space and view the universe as a canvas to be controlled and mastered. Their population on any one planet varies, but when counted across the entire galaxy, their numbers are mind-numbing in scale.

Although a mi-go resembles an arthropod, the creature is actually a highly evolved form of fungus. Mi-go can speak in a buzzing voice, but their own language consists of the complex shifting of color patterns upon their bulbous heads. This communication allows for the dissemination of astounding amounts of information quickly, but for those other than mi-go, speaking the language requires special equipment.

Mi-go meld faith and science, magic and technology, and other themes together into an unsettling whole. Most mi-go serve Nyarlathotep or other entities of the Elder Mythos, and their minds work in a fashion alien to typical humanoid thinking. To migo, their devotion to their gods isn’t admiration, slavery, or worship—it’s akin to the relationship between a student and a professor.

Other minions of the Elder Mythos might be allies, but mi-go consider themselves to be superior to most living things. Gifted with supernatural skill in surgery and biotechnology, mi-go can rework the flesh of those they capture with precision, remaking their victims into forms more appropriate for servitude or for truly alien aesthetics. These alien fungi can also keep creatures alive through the most invasive surgical procedures, so those who fall prey to mi-go don’t retain their sanity for long. Using their technology and ability to squeeze into a tighter shape, mi-go construct cunning disguises, replacing those whose brains they’ve harvested in order to invade societies from within. Only the mi-go know the extent to which they’ve infiltrated societies throughout the galaxy. A mi-go is the size of a human but weighs only 90 pounds.

Moon Giant

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 15 XP: 51,200

LN Huge humanoid (giant)

Init.: +4 Senses: low-light vision, sense through (vision, 60 ft.) Perception: +31

Aura: lunar (60 ft., DC 21)

Defense

HP: 330

EAC: 29 KAC: 31

Fort: +17 Ref: +17 Will: +19

Offense

Speed: 50 ft.

Melee: slam +25 (8d6+24 B)

Ranged: hurled debris +28 (8d6+30 B plus 10-ft.-radius area of difficult terrain around the spot where the debris hit)

Offensive Abilities: crush (8d6+24 B)

Statistics

Str: +9 Dex: +4 Con: +7 Wis: +5 Int: +3 Cha: +3

Skills: Intimidate +31, Life Science +26, Mysticism +31, Sense Motive +26

Languages: Common, Terran

Ecology

Environment: any lunar

Organization: solitary, pair, or cult (3–6)

Special Abilities

Hurl Debris (Ex) The mighty strength of a giant allows it to turn nearly anything into a ranged weapon. A giant is assumed to have such debris available (either loose or readily torn from the environment without requiring an extra action) unless the GM rules otherwise. Hurled debris has a range increment equal to the giant’s Strength modifier × 5 feet. Such attacks also create difficult terrain in a 5-foot-radius area around the target, or a 10-foot-radius area for Huge and larger giants.

Lunar Aura (Su) Creatures within 60 feet of a moon giant are affected by its lunar aura as long as they remain within range. A creature that succeeds at its save against the aura is immune to that particular moon giant’s lunar aura for 24 hours. A moon giant can change the effect of the aura as a swift action, and the giant can choose whether to include itself as part of the same swift action. The giant can choose one of the following effects.

Waning: Affected creatures fall asleep as deep slumber. The giant’s lunar aura is not limited by CR or Hit Dice.
Waxing: Affected creatures gain a number of temporary Hit Points equal to the giant’s CR and gain the ability to make three attacks during a full attack, though each attack takes a –5 penalty (instead of a –4 penalty).

Description

Giants are humanoid creatures with great strength and mighty stature, standing from 9 feet to over 25 feet tall. They often live apart from other races, as even space stations intended to be inclusive of multiple species are often too small to comfortably accommodate a giant’s massive size. How welcoming these giants are to non-giant visitors depends on the specific giant society, though all giants can be unpredictable and dangerous to others.

Moonflower Titan

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 16 XP: 76,800

N Gargantuan plant

Init.: -1 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +28

Defense

HP: 300

EAC: 30 KAC: 32

Fort: +20 Ref: +14 Will: +18

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: bite +30 (6d10+26 B plus swallow whole)

Offensive Abilities: moon pulse, swallow whole (0 or 10d6 A & B [see text], EAC 30, KAC 28, 75 HP)

Statistics

Str: +10 Dex: -1 Con: +7 Wis: +5 Int: -2 Cha: +0

Skills: Stealth +28 (+33 in dense vegetation)

Languages: telepathy (10 miles, other moonflowers only)

Ecology

Environment: any land

Organization: solitary, pair, or grove (1 plus 2–8 moonflowers)

Special Abilities

Moon Pulse (Su) As a standard action, a moonflower titan can emit a pulse of bright light and psychic static from its body. Each creature within a 50-foot spherical spread originating from the moonflower’s space must attempt a DC 22 Fortitude save. Those that fail are blinded, deafened, and unable to use any other sense for 1d4 rounds. Other than the blinding affect, this ability is a mind-affecting effect. A creature that is immune to mind-affecting effects but in the area and able to see the moonflower can be blinded by this effect.

Pod Spawn (Ex) A Small or larger living creature that dies while enclosed in a digestive pod is digested, its body completely destroyed in 1 hour. Another hour later, the pod sprouts into a new moonflower. This new moonflower has features that bear a minor resemblance to the digested creature. Any equipment the digested creature carried remains inside the new moonflower. A Huge creature transforms into a moonflower titan instead of a moonflower.

Root Tremor (Ex) As a full action, a moonflower titan can thrust its roots and tentacles into the ground, causing a violent tremor. Each creature within a 50-foot-radius spread originating in the moonflower’s space must attempt a DC 22 Reflex saving throw. Those that fail take 10d6 bludgeoning damage and fall prone. Creatures that succeed take half the damage and remain standing.

Swallow Whole (Ex)

Description

A moonflower is an enormous plant with a twisted, knotted trunk that reaches a height of 20 feet or more. Atop this stem is a maw capable of swallowing large prey. Powerful tendrils at the base of the creature dig deeply into the ground beneath, but these can quickly uproot, allowing the moonflower to move.

Despite their presence on many worlds, moonflowers are poorly understood. They aren’t known to communicate with other living creatures, but they do use a bizarre form of telepathy that allows them to communicate with one another. When someone has managed to intrude upon a moonflower’s strange thoughts, the only images to be found are of dense forests, jungles, or swamps ruled by sentient plant life. Whether these images mean the creatures share a consciousness, have some type of genetic memory, or portend something entirely different remains unclear.

What is clear is that all moonflowers feed and reproduce through similar means. Biotechnologists have long studied moonflower reproduction for its cloning ramifications and possible application to other fields. The researchers who observe moonflowers usually do so remotely to remain safe, but they have managed to learn quite a bit about the plant’s curious life cycle. When a moonflower creates a pod spawn, the root systems of the progenitor and its offspring become intertwined and share the nutrients of the digested creature. In this way, several groves in the Pact Worlds have flourished in areas rich with animal life. The island of Feylonar on Castrovel is home to one of the most well-known groves. Xenobotanists assume some mechanism keeps moonflowers from eating all available life and running out of food, while others speculate that moonflowers “manage” the animal population where they live. However, the truth is unknown.

Some massive moonflower specimens have been dubbed “titans” for their prodigious size and appetites. Growing up to 50 feet in height, these creatures tower over their smaller kin while maintaining a similar overall appearance. The nutrition such creatures need to sustain themselves makes them quite rare. On the planet Galvix, however, where the primary sentient population is humanoid giants, a significant population of moonflower titans thrives. As a response, the native giants have developed hunting traditions around pruning the moonflowers every decade or so to keep their numbers in check. During these times, human-sized and smaller offworlders are invited to try their hands at moonflower hunts.

Xenobotanists have long been intrigued by the moonflower’s ability to produce powerful bursts of light. After many unsuccessful attempts to harness this capability from moonflower tissue alone, they discovered that grafting a bioengineered light-producing nodule to another living creature could give that host the ability to activate a similar light-burst effect. Given the strange thoughts of moonflowers, however, few customers elect to have such an

installed.

Moonflower

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

N Huge plant

Init.: +0 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +16

Defense

HP: 125

EAC: 20 KAC: 22

Fort: +12 Ref: +7 Will: +10

Offense

Speed: 20 ft.

Melee: bite +19 (2d6+14 B plus swallow whole)

Offensive Abilities: light pulse, swallow whole (0 or 4d6 A [see text], EAC 20, KAC 18, 31 HP)

Statistics

Str: +6 Dex: +0 Con: +4 Wis: +2 Int: -3 Cha: +0

Skills: Stealth +16 (+21 in dense vegetation)

Languages: telepathy (1 mile, other moonflowers only)

Ecology

Environment: any land

Organization: solitary, pair, or cluster (3–8)

Special Abilities

Light Pulse (Su) As a standard action, a moonflower can emit a pulse of bright light from its body. Creatures within 50 feet of and able to see the moonflower must succeed at a DC 16 Fortitude save or be blinded for 1d4 rounds.

Pod Spawn (Ex) A Small or larger living creature that dies while enclosed in a digestive pod is digested, its body completely destroyed in 1 hour. Another hour later, the pod sprouts into a new moonflower. This new moonflower has features that bear a minor resemblance to the digested creature. Any equipment the digested creature carried remains inside the new moonflower.

Swallow Whole (Ex)

Description

A moonflower is an enormous plant with a twisted, knotted trunk that reaches a height of 20 feet or more. Atop this stem is a maw capable of swallowing large prey. Powerful tendrils at the base of the creature dig deeply into the ground beneath, but these can quickly uproot, allowing the moonflower to move.

Despite their presence on many worlds, moonflowers are poorly understood. They aren’t known to communicate with other living creatures, but they do use a bizarre form of telepathy that allows them to communicate with one another. When someone has managed to intrude upon a moonflower’s strange thoughts, the only images to be found are of dense forests, jungles, or swamps ruled by sentient plant life. Whether these images mean the creatures share a consciousness, have some type of genetic memory, or portend something entirely different remains unclear.

What is clear is that all moonflowers feed and reproduce through similar means. Biotechnologists have long studied moonflower reproduction for its cloning ramifications and possible application to other fields. The researchers who observe moonflowers usually do so remotely to remain safe, but they have managed to learn quite a bit about the plant’s curious life cycle. When a moonflower creates a pod spawn, the root systems of the progenitor and its offspring become intertwined and share the nutrients of the digested creature. In this way, several groves in the Pact Worlds have flourished in areas rich with animal life. The island of Feylonar on Castrovel is home to one of the most well-known groves. Xenobotanists assume some mechanism keeps moonflowers from eating all available life and running out of food, while others speculate that moonflowers “manage” the animal population where they live. However, the truth is unknown.

Some massive moonflower specimens have been dubbed “titans” for their prodigious size and appetites. Growing up to 50 feet in height, these creatures tower over their smaller kin while maintaining a similar overall appearance. The nutrition such creatures need to sustain themselves makes them quite rare. On the planet Galvix, however, where the primary sentient population is humanoid giants, a significant population of moonflower titans thrives. As a response, the native giants have developed hunting traditions around pruning the moonflowers every decade or so to keep their numbers in check. During these times, human-sized and smaller offworlders are invited to try their hands at moonflower hunts.

Xenobotanists have long been intrigued by the moonflower’s ability to produce powerful bursts of light. After many unsuccessful attempts to harness this capability from moonflower tissue alone, they discovered that grafting a bioengineered light-producing nodule to another living creature could give that host the ability to activate a similar light-burst effect. Given the strange thoughts of moonflowers, however, few customers elect to have such an

installed.

Old Void Dragon

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 18 XP: 153,600

NE Gargantuan dragon

Init.: +7 Senses: blindsense (vibration) 60 ft., darkvision 120 ft., low-light vision, see in darkness Perception: +31

Aura: alien presence (240 ft., sickened 2d4 rounds, DC 25)

Defense

HP: 350

EAC: 32 KAC: 33

Fort: +18 Ref: +18 Will: +22

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., fly 250 ft. (Su, clumsy)

Melee: bite +31 (8d8+29 P plus obliterate)

Offensive Abilities: breath weapon (60-ft. cone, 19d10 E, DC 25, usable every 1d4 rounds), crush (8d8+29 B), suffocating breath (DC 25)

Statistics

Str: +11 Dex: +3 Con: +8 Wis: +3 Int: +6 Cha: +3

Skills: Acrobatics +31 (+23 to fly), Bluff +31, Computers +31, Culture +36, Diplomacy +36, Mysticism +36, Piloting +31, Sense Motive +31

Languages: Abyssal, Aklo, Auran, Common, Draconic, Ignan, Infernal, Terran

Ecology

Environment: any vacuum

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Obliterate (Su) A creature that is reduced to 0 Hit Points by a void dragon’s bite attack must spend 1 Resolve point or be immediately slain and reduced to dust.

Suffocating Breath (Su) Instead of a cone of cold, a void dragon can breathe a 30-foot cone of energy that suffocates those it touches. Air-breathing creatures within the cone must succeed at a Fortitude save or begin attempting Constitution checks to avoid suffocation, even if they have environmental protections.

An affected creature can attempt a new Fortitude saving throw at the beginning of each turn to shake off this effect and regain its air supply.

Description

Rarer than chromatic and metallic dragons, outer dragons are born and live in the vast depths of space, generally serving either their own inscrutable interests or those of some unknowable galactic force. As such, their actions can be especially frightening to the everyday citizens of the Pact Worlds and beyond. Even the methods by which outer dragons are born are shrouded in mystery. Some believe that outer dragons burst forth fully formed from the galaxy’s stars, with the void’s magic and energy coalescing into one mighty creature in an instantaneous moment of creation. Others think that outer dragons are manifestations of the universe’s will and come into being slowly, over the course of centuries, like a mote of matter might eventually become a star.

Outer dragons have forms similar to those of other true dragons, though their bodies are covered with more spiky protrusions, and their coloration patterns fluctuate as they move. Outer dragons have wings that allow them to move through vacuums and areas of no gravity with ease, thanks to some supernatural process that has yet to be fully understood.

Orc Technician

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 200

CE Medium humanoid (orc)

Init.: +0 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +4

Defense

HP: 12

EAC: 10 KAC: 11

Fort: +3 Ref: +0 Will: +0

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: tactical baton +4 (1d4+1 B)

Ranged: azimuth laser pistol +3 (1d4 F; critical burn 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +0 Con: +3 Wis: +0 Int: +2 Cha: -1

Skills: Computers +9, Engineering +9, Intimidate +4, Survival +9

Languages: Common, Drow, Orc

Gear: estex suit I, azimuth laser pistol with 1 battery (20 charges), tactical baton

Ecology

Environment: any (Apostae)

Organization: solitary, pair, or team (3–6)

Special Abilities

Light Sensitivity (Ex) An orc is dazzled as long as she remains in an area of bright light.

Description

Orcs are rare, although records suggest they were numerous on lost Golarion. Today, they can be found in greatest numbers on Apostae, where most are drow-held slaves. Over the ages, however, some orcs have gained freedom, creating formidable armed clans on Apostae and a few other worlds in the galaxy, though many free orcs of Apostae remain second-class citizens who still serve the drow as mercenaries, technicians, and laborers.

Few people of the Pact Worlds have ever seen an orc up close, but most people know their reputation as brutal monsters. Even the free orcs on Apostae suffer from isolation and drow propaganda, remaining ignorant of wider possibilities. On average, orcs have difficulty with attention, memory, and impulse control. Drow care little for where these tendencies come from, but their centuries-long influence has changed the orcs from the brutes described in pre-Gap histories. The drow have socially engineered their orc chattel to make them useful servants. From an early age, capable orc youngsters have a duty to care for any orcs who require help to survive. Aged or feeble orcs are permitted to endure only to teach the young valuable skills while indoctrinating them with the appropriate regard for their betters. Drow overseers keep watch over these enclaves, with the aid of half-orcs and a few elder orcs rewarded for loyal service with the right to “retire” to teaching positions.

Within orc enclaves on Apostae, a specialized program of reward and punishment accompanies education and tempers orcs for the jobs they are expected to perform. For example, an orc anticipated to be a technician might be conditioned to respond well and even take pleasure in technical work, such that her skill seems abnormally good. A bodyguard could be habituated to extreme ferocity in defense of a ward, belied by an otherwise composed demeanor. When an orc becomes an adult, she moves on to serve the drow house to which she belongs in her trained capacity. There, her conditioned mind keeps her bound better than any chains could.

This social engineering took place for long enough that free orcs display a similar cultural structure. These orcs teach their young with analogous and comparably brutal methods of reward and punishment. The young and weak take on jobs that tougher orcs have the clout and muscle to refuse. Eventually, a young orc might join the ranks of the strong and earn the right to take on responsibilities that garner more prestige. She then sloughs off tasks she considers to be beneath her onto the shoulders of those she sees as lower than her in status.

An orc is ideally suited to her prescribed duties thanks to the extensive conditioning she receives. Her confidence in such areas is also high. An orc trained to scout the caves of Apostae, for instance, is likely to be a sharp climber and shrewd explorer. She also knows enough about the ilee (a lost race native to Apostae) to know when she has made an important discovery.

The social conditions in which most orcs exist often make it challenging for them to assimilate into other cultures. Orcs are gruff and terse, interacting with others only when necessary. An orc without a hierarchy to embrace or reject often struggles to find her position in a pecking order that might not exist.

An orc has large and imposing tusks that jut from her mouth, as well as pointed ears. Most orcs stand around 6 feet tall and weigh 200 pounds or more, with welldefined musculature.

Orc Trooper

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 5 XP: 1,600

CE Medium humanoid (orc)

Init.: +7 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +11

Defense

HP: 70

EAC: 17 KAC: 19

Fort: +7 Ref: +7 Will: +4

Offense

Speed: 45 ft. (40 ft. in armor)

Melee: fangblade +14 (1d12+7 S; critical bleed 1d8)

Ranged: thunderstrike sonic rifle +13 (1d10+3 So; critical deafen [DC 13])

Offensive Abilities: charge attack, fighting styles (blitz), rapid response

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +2 Con: +3 Wis: +0 Int: +0 Cha: -1

Skills: Intimidate +11, Survival +16

Languages: Common, Orc

Gear: officer ceremonial plate, fangblade with 1 battery (20 charges), thunderstrike sonic rifle with 1 highcapacity battery (40 charges)

Ecology

Environment: any (Apostae)

Organization: solitary, pair, or squad (3–4)

Special Abilities

Light Sensitivity (Ex) An orc is dazzled as long as she remains in an area of bright light.

Description

Orcs are rare, although records suggest they were numerous on lost Golarion. Today, they can be found in greatest numbers on Apostae, where most are drow-held slaves. Over the ages, however, some orcs have gained freedom, creating formidable armed clans on Apostae and a few other worlds in the galaxy, though many free orcs of Apostae remain second-class citizens who still serve the drow as mercenaries, technicians, and laborers.

Few people of the Pact Worlds have ever seen an orc up close, but most people know their reputation as brutal monsters. Even the free orcs on Apostae suffer from isolation and drow propaganda, remaining ignorant of wider possibilities. On average, orcs have difficulty with attention, memory, and impulse control. Drow care little for where these tendencies come from, but their centuries-long influence has changed the orcs from the brutes described in pre-Gap histories. The drow have socially engineered their orc chattel to make them useful servants. From an early age, capable orc youngsters have a duty to care for any orcs who require help to survive. Aged or feeble orcs are permitted to endure only to teach the young valuable skills while indoctrinating them with the appropriate regard for their betters. Drow overseers keep watch over these enclaves, with the aid of half-orcs and a few elder orcs rewarded for loyal service with the right to “retire” to teaching positions.

Within orc enclaves on Apostae, a specialized program of reward and punishment accompanies education and tempers orcs for the jobs they are expected to perform. For example, an orc anticipated to be a technician might be conditioned to respond well and even take pleasure in technical work, such that her skill seems abnormally good. A bodyguard could be habituated to extreme ferocity in defense of a ward, belied by an otherwise composed demeanor. When an orc becomes an adult, she moves on to serve the drow house to which she belongs in her trained capacity. There, her conditioned mind keeps her bound better than any chains could.

This social engineering took place for long enough that free orcs display a similar cultural structure. These orcs teach their young with analogous and comparably brutal methods of reward and punishment. The young and weak take on jobs that tougher orcs have the clout and muscle to refuse. Eventually, a young orc might join the ranks of the strong and earn the right to take on responsibilities that garner more prestige. She then sloughs off tasks she considers to be beneath her onto the shoulders of those she sees as lower than her in status.

An orc is ideally suited to her prescribed duties thanks to the extensive conditioning she receives. Her confidence in such areas is also high. An orc trained to scout the caves of Apostae, for instance, is likely to be a sharp climber and shrewd explorer. She also knows enough about the ilee (a lost race native to Apostae) to know when she has made an important discovery.

The social conditions in which most orcs exist often make it challenging for them to assimilate into other cultures. Orcs are gruff and terse, interacting with others only when necessary. An orc without a hierarchy to embrace or reject often struggles to find her position in a pecking order that might not exist.

An orc has large and imposing tusks that jut from her mouth, as well as pointed ears. Most orcs stand around 6 feet tall and weigh 200 pounds or more, with welldefined musculature.

Osharu Headteacher

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

LN Medium monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +16

Defense

HP: 105 RP: 4

EAC: 19 KAC: 20

Fort: +7 Ref: +9 Will: +13

Offense

Speed: 25 ft., swim 25 ft.

Melee: carbon staff +14 (1d8+9 B; critical knockdown)

Ranged: corona laser pistol +16 (2d4+8 F; critical burn 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: None

Spells Known: Known

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +2 Con: +0 Wis: +6 Int: +4 Cha: +2

Skills: Culture +16, Life Science +21, Medicine +16, Mysticism +21, Physical Science +21, Profession (professor) +16

Languages: Common, Osharu

Gear: advanced lashunta tempweave, carbon staff, corona laser pistol with 2 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: pair or expedition (1 headteacher plus 3–6 osharus)

Special Abilities

Slime (Ex) As a swift action, an osharu can excrete slime into an empty adjacent square, causing that square to become difficult terrain. An osharu can use this ability 1d4 times per day before she must rest for at least 8 hours to replenish her slime stores.

Susceptible to Salt (Ex) A handful or more of salt or a splash of salt water deals 1d6 damage to an osharu, and full immersion in salt water deals 4d6 damage per round. These effects are negated by the environmental protections built into most armor.

Description

To the slug-like osharus, religion and science are two sides of the same coin—concepts with the same intrinsic dependencies as life and death. These timid monk-scientists dedicate their lives to studying various fields of science, sharing their discoveries with their fellow osharus and other races that express a passion for epiphany. They dedicate their discoveries to their deity Yaraesa, patron of learning and science.

Osharu settlements are essentially citysized universities. Individuals involved in similar fields of study group together so they can aid in each others’ research, and entire districts spring up naturally around these congregations of higher learning, equipped with canteens, vast libraries, living quarters, and workstations relevant to their field.

This ultimate quest for knowledge knows no planetary bounds; osharus often embark on fieldwork expeditions to other star systems in order to study foreign planets, stars, or even the emptiness of space itself. They also frequently go on diplomatic missions to exchange knowledge with other intelligent, enlightenment-minded races.

Thought stalwart in mind and faith, osharus are physically delicate. They are harmed not only by salt and salt water, but also have a cumbersome dependence on moisture and humid environments. Exposure to extreme heat or direct sunlight for extended amounts of time without protective magic or armor makes them extremely uncomfortable. Those who aren’t magically inclined might even resort to soaking their clothes and carrying large canteens of water for rehydration when exploring even mildly arid biomes.

Despite the osharus’ willingness to face great dangers, they are a timid and paranoid race. Their most common fear is that their desire to explore the galaxy and exchange knowledge with other species could ultimately result in their exploitation—or even their eradication. To cope with this paranoia, they flatly refuse to travel beyond the safety of their university-cities while alone, always accompanying at least one other osharu so they can protect and comfort one another. Osharus sometimes develop such a bond with equally sensitive members of other species, establishing a similar system of mutual support.

The average osharu is 4 feet tall and weighs 140 pounds, though members of the species have a wide variety of colors and patterns. Even two parents with similar patterns or colors can have completely different-looking offspring—it is not unusual for a beige, leopard-spotted osharu to give birth to bright-pink or green tiger-striped progeny. This diversity is celebrated among osharu, and they find the predictability of hereditary outcomes among other humanoid species to be both unusual and fascinating—most of their university-cities have a district dedicated to the study of xenogenetics as a result.

Osharu

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 200

LG Medium monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +1 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +4

Defense

HP: 10

EAC: 10 KAC: 11

Fort: +0 Ref: +2 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 25 ft., swim 25 ft.

Melee: unarmed strike +3 (1d3 B nonlethal)

Ranged: pulsecaster pistol +5 (1d4 E nonlethal)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +1 Con: -1 Wis: +2 Int: +3 Cha: +0

Skills: Culture +4, Life Science +9, Medicine +4, Mysticism +9, Physical Science +9

Languages: Common, Osharu

Gear: pulsecaster pistol with 2 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: pair or expedition (3–6 plus 1 headteacher)

Special Abilities

Slime (Ex) As a swift action, an osharu can excrete slime into an empty adjacent square, causing that square to become difficult terrain. An osharu can use this ability 1d4 times per day before she must rest for at least 8 hours to replenish her slime stores.

Susceptible to Salt (Ex) A handful or more of salt or a splash of salt water deals 1d6 damage to an osharu, and full immersion in salt water deals 4d6 damage per round. These effects are negated by the environmental protections built into most armor.

Description

To the slug-like osharus, religion and science are two sides of the same coin—concepts with the same intrinsic dependencies as life and death. These timid monk-scientists dedicate their lives to studying various fields of science, sharing their discoveries with their fellow osharus and other races that express a passion for epiphany. They dedicate their discoveries to their deity Yaraesa, patron of learning and science.

Osharu settlements are essentially citysized universities. Individuals involved in similar fields of study group together so they can aid in each others’ research, and entire districts spring up naturally around these congregations of higher learning, equipped with canteens, vast libraries, living quarters, and workstations relevant to their field.

This ultimate quest for knowledge knows no planetary bounds; osharus often embark on fieldwork expeditions to other star systems in order to study foreign planets, stars, or even the emptiness of space itself. They also frequently go on diplomatic missions to exchange knowledge with other intelligent, enlightenment-minded races.

Thought stalwart in mind and faith, osharus are physically delicate. They are harmed not only by salt and salt water, but also have a cumbersome dependence on moisture and humid environments. Exposure to extreme heat or direct sunlight for extended amounts of time without protective magic or armor makes them extremely uncomfortable. Those who aren’t magically inclined might even resort to soaking their clothes and carrying large canteens of water for rehydration when exploring even mildly arid biomes.

Despite the osharus’ willingness to face great dangers, they are a timid and paranoid race. Their most common fear is that their desire to explore the galaxy and exchange knowledge with other species could ultimately result in their exploitation—or even their eradication. To cope with this paranoia, they flatly refuse to travel beyond the safety of their university-cities while alone, always accompanying at least one other osharu so they can protect and comfort one another. Osharus sometimes develop such a bond with equally sensitive members of other species, establishing a similar system of mutual support.

The average osharu is 4 feet tall and weighs 140 pounds, though members of the species have a wide variety of colors and patterns. Even two parents with similar patterns or colors can have completely different-looking offspring—it is not unusual for a beige, leopard-spotted osharu to give birth to bright-pink or green tiger-striped progeny. This diversity is celebrated among osharu, and they find the predictability of hereditary outcomes among other humanoid species to be both unusual and fascinating—most of their university-cities have a district dedicated to the study of xenogenetics as a result.

Pahtra Inquisitive

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 2 XP: 600

N Medium humanoid (pahtra)

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +7

Defense

HP: 20

EAC: 12 KAC: 13

Fort: +1 Ref: +3 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: tactical baton +4 (1d4+2 B)

Ranged: static arc pistol +6 (1d6+2 E; critical arc 2)

Offensive Abilities: None

Spells Known: Spells Known

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +2 Con: +0 Wis: +1 Int: +4 Cha: +1

Skills: Acrobatics +12, Computers +12, Mysticism +7, Profession (dancer) +7, Stealth +12

Languages: Common, Pahtra, Vesk

Gear: kasatha microcord I, static arc pistol with 2 batteries (20 charges each), tactical baton

Ecology

Environment: any (Vesk-6)

Organization: solitary, pair, or clowder (3–8)

Special Abilities

Nimble (Ex) An off-kilter pahtra doesn’t gain the flat-footed condition or take the normal penalty to attacks, and she can steady herself as a swift action instead of a move action.

Description

The catlike pahtras are one of the most prominent species of the Veskarium, natives of a lush world they call Pulonis but that the Veskarium designates as Vesk-6. Their home planet’s relatively low gravity and fast predatory species resulted in the pahtras evolving into a lean race with elongated humanoid bodies and limbs. Pahtras’ fur ranges in color from tawny brown to shades of black and gray, while their eyes can be virtually any color of the visible spectrum. According to ancient traditions, a pahtra’s unique facial pattern indicates her character and potential for achievement. Some pahtra societies still assign adolescent pahtras to a specific social role after a reading of her face patterns by a pahtra mystic. However, the most recent generations of pahtras have begun to resist this often-superficial classification, especially as news reaches Vesk-6 of prominent offworld pahtras who break their supposed type.

While the tradition of assigning status based on facial fur patterns is fading, similarly ancient rites requiring all pahtras, regardless of status, to participate in a dangerous, weeks-long competition in their 15th year are still very common. Such competitions involve dividing the adolescents into groups of a dozen each and sending them into the jungle. There, they face both natural threats and their peers in survival challenges and war games that result in more than a few casualties each year. The performance of a pahtra in this rite often dictates the trajectory of their social standing thereafter.

Most pahtras are asexual, and a relatively small number of breeding couples bolster the population with litters of six to eight kits at a time. While pahtras frequently form lifelong, loving relationships with a single partner or small set of partners, they cherish individualism above all else. From their first steps, they strive to distinguish themselves from their siblings by developing and perfecting a unique ability. This inclination also makes pahtras highly suspicious of conformism—including that demanded by their vesk overseers—and while they can be deeply distrustful of strangers, they are also very protective of those they consider friends.

Pahtra culture sees music and battle as the two greatest possible career paths, defining all other activities by how they relate to these callings. They also see strong synergies in the two pursuits, using music not just for artistic expression but also to coordinate battles and intimidate their enemies. Pahtras have perfect pitch and are natural musicians, and their music plays a central role in their society. They use arias, ballads, and elaborate musicals to tell the stories of their most legendary warriors, and they play bass- and percussion-heavy music to bolster their morale on the battlefield.

When the first wave of vesk forces arrived on Vesk-6, pahtras were much less advanced technologically, and though their many nations had significant similarities in culture, they were in no way united or uniform. They were ultimately unable to resist the vesk’s advanced weapons, starships, and interplanetary empire, but their warrior traditions, knowledge of local terrain, and willingness to fight for their homelands ensured the vesk conquest was neither swift nor easy. Their bold resistance won the pahtras no small amount of respect from the lizard-like race. While some smaller pahtra collectives were destroyed in the war, others formed coalitions and grew into larger and more varied nation-states. In time, all these major pahtra nations signed treaties with the Veskarium, accepting vesk rule and a host of Veskarium regulations in return for largely maintaining self-rule in local matters. Only the enormous Command 6 military base that serves as the capital of Vesk-6 and base of operations for the planet’s vesk high despot is ruled entirely by vesk officers and officials; more remote regions are generally overseen by a consul who works with local pahtra governments. While most such consuls are retired vesk officers, a few pahtra consuls also exist.

Vesk-6 and its people are now unquestionably part of the Veskarium, but most pahtra uphold their cultural traditions, trusting in their ancient ways of life to keep them distinct (and often far away) from the vesk ruling class. Some groups seek to punish the vesk for their conquest, even seeking to expel their conquerors and reclaim Pulonis as their own, but such efforts rarely do more than draw the ire of legions of Veskarium peacekeepers.

Most pahtras who refuse to live under vesk rule instead take advantage of the opportunities presented by the Veskarium’s alliance with the Pact Worlds, and travel far from their home planet to try their luck as explorers, mercenaries, musicians, or seers.

Pahtra Stalker

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

N Medium humanoid (pahtra)

Init.: +7 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +14

Defense

HP: 82 RP: 4

EAC: 18 KAC: 19

Fort: +5 Ref: +8 Will: +9

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: tactical knife +12 (2d4+6 S)

Ranged: advanced semi-auto pistol +14 (2d6+6 P) or tactical shirren-eye rifle +14 (1d10+6 P)

Offensive Abilities: debilitating trick, trick attack +3d8

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +5 Con: +0 Wis: +2 Int: +3 Cha: +1

Skills: Acrobatics +14, Athletics +19, Bluff +14, Culture +19, Profession (mercenary) +19, Sense Motive +19, Stealth +19

Languages: Common, Pahtra, Vesk

Gear: elite stationwear, advanced semi-auto pistol with 24 small arm rounds, tactical knife, tactical shirren-eye rifle with 25 sniper rounds

Ecology

Environment: any (Vesk-6)

Organization: solitary or pair

Special Abilities

Nimble (Ex) An off-kilter pahtra doesn’t gain the flat-footed condition or take the normal penalty to attacks, and she can steady herself as a swift action instead of a move action.

Description

The catlike pahtras are one of the most prominent species of the Veskarium, natives of a lush world they call Pulonis but that the Veskarium designates as Vesk-6. Their home planet’s relatively low gravity and fast predatory species resulted in the pahtras evolving into a lean race with elongated humanoid bodies and limbs. Pahtras’ fur ranges in color from tawny brown to shades of black and gray, while their eyes can be virtually any color of the visible spectrum. According to ancient traditions, a pahtra’s unique facial pattern indicates her character and potential for achievement. Some pahtra societies still assign adolescent pahtras to a specific social role after a reading of her face patterns by a pahtra mystic. However, the most recent generations of pahtras have begun to resist this often-superficial classification, especially as news reaches Vesk-6 of prominent offworld pahtras who break their supposed type.

While the tradition of assigning status based on facial fur patterns is fading, similarly ancient rites requiring all pahtras, regardless of status, to participate in a dangerous, weeks-long competition in their 15th year are still very common. Such competitions involve dividing the adolescents into groups of a dozen each and sending them into the jungle. There, they face both natural threats and their peers in survival challenges and war games that result in more than a few casualties each year. The performance of a pahtra in this rite often dictates the trajectory of their social standing thereafter.

Most pahtras are asexual, and a relatively small number of breeding couples bolster the population with litters of six to eight kits at a time. While pahtras frequently form lifelong, loving relationships with a single partner or small set of partners, they cherish individualism above all else. From their first steps, they strive to distinguish themselves from their siblings by developing and perfecting a unique ability. This inclination also makes pahtras highly suspicious of conformism—including that demanded by their vesk overseers—and while they can be deeply distrustful of strangers, they are also very protective of those they consider friends.

Pahtra culture sees music and battle as the two greatest possible career paths, defining all other activities by how they relate to these callings. They also see strong synergies in the two pursuits, using music not just for artistic expression but also to coordinate battles and intimidate their enemies. Pahtras have perfect pitch and are natural musicians, and their music plays a central role in their society. They use arias, ballads, and elaborate musicals to tell the stories of their most legendary warriors, and they play bass- and percussion-heavy music to bolster their morale on the battlefield.

When the first wave of vesk forces arrived on Vesk-6, pahtras were much less advanced technologically, and though their many nations had significant similarities in culture, they were in no way united or uniform. They were ultimately unable to resist the vesk’s advanced weapons, starships, and interplanetary empire, but their warrior traditions, knowledge of local terrain, and willingness to fight for their homelands ensured the vesk conquest was neither swift nor easy. Their bold resistance won the pahtras no small amount of respect from the lizard-like race. While some smaller pahtra collectives were destroyed in the war, others formed coalitions and grew into larger and more varied nation-states. In time, all these major pahtra nations signed treaties with the Veskarium, accepting vesk rule and a host of Veskarium regulations in return for largely maintaining self-rule in local matters. Only the enormous Command 6 military base that serves as the capital of Vesk-6 and base of operations for the planet’s vesk high despot is ruled entirely by vesk officers and officials; more remote regions are generally overseen by a consul who works with local pahtra governments. While most such consuls are retired vesk officers, a few pahtra consuls also exist.

Vesk-6 and its people are now unquestionably part of the Veskarium, but most pahtra uphold their cultural traditions, trusting in their ancient ways of life to keep them distinct (and often far away) from the vesk ruling class. Some groups seek to punish the vesk for their conquest, even seeking to expel their conquerors and reclaim Pulonis as their own, but such efforts rarely do more than draw the ire of legions of Veskarium peacekeepers.

Most pahtras who refuse to live under vesk rule instead take advantage of the opportunities presented by the Veskarium’s alliance with the Pact Worlds, and travel far from their home planet to try their luck as explorers, mercenaries, musicians, or seers.

Phentomite Bridger

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

NG Medium humanoid (phentomite)

Init.: +7 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +19

Defense

HP: 80

EAC: 18 KAC: 19

Fort: +5 Ref: +12 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., climb 30 ft., swim 30 ft.

Melee: tactical knife +12 (2d4+8 S)

Ranged: tactical semi-auto pistol +14 (1d6+6 P) or tactical shirren-eye rifle +14 (1d10+6 P)

Offensive Abilities: debilitating trick, trick attack +3d8

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +5 Con: +0 Wis: +3 Int: +2 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +19, Athletics +19 (+27 to climb or swim), Culture +14, Engineering +14, Survival +19

Languages: Orrian

Gear: elite stationwear, tactical knife, tactical semi-auto pistol with 27 small arm rounds, tactical shirren-eye rifle with 20 sniper rounds

Ecology

Environment: any (Orry)

Organization: solitary or pair

Special Abilities

Acclimated (Ex) Phentomites are acclimated to thin atmospheres and high altitudes, and they count as Small creatures for the purpose of slow suffocation.

Heat Tracker (Ex) As a full action, a phentomite can alter her vision to detect the latent heat trails left by passing creatures. This allows the phentomite to use the Perception skill to perform the follow tracks task of the Survival skill and also functions as the tracking universal creature rule. While this ability is active, the phentomite takes a –1 penalty to Reflex saving throws. The phentomite can deactivate this ability as a move action.

Description

Phentomites are native inhabitants of Orry, an unusual cluster of landmasses floating in regular orbits around a gravitational anomaly in Near Space. Thousands of years ago, the planet Orry was a technomagical utopia, but a massive industrial accident caused much of the world’s mass to explode into space. However, mystical gravitational forces created in this disaster allowed the land that survived to remain inhabitable, albeit with a thin atmosphere. Orry now consists of 10 country-sized landmasses, along with several dozen smaller formations, that slowly rotate around a central point—sometimes coming within mere feet of one another but never colliding.

Orry’s surviving population continued on in the subsequent centuries, though the society lost much of the scientific and magical advancement of its forebears. The phentomites of today live in nations engaged in relatively low-tech artisanship, farming, and trading. They adapted to the low-oxygen environment much as creatures who live their whole lives at high altitudes do. Their eyes have adjusted to be able to see in the dark, and they’ve developed specialized nerves that grant limited thermographic vision; the latter might be a mutation caused by arcane fallout from Orry’s planet-breaking accident.

The typical phentomite is 7 feet tall and weighs 175 pounds. Though mostly blue, a phentomite’s skin is striated with other colors, especially across the chest and arms. These streaks vary in coloration between phentomites from different areas of the planet; some have green and yellow bands, while others have red and purple lines of color. Their backward-bending legs give them a natural ability to jump farther than most humanoids, and their ungual feet grant them purchase on rocky slopes. Phentomites often decorate their large forehead ridges with dangling charms of religious or personal significance.

The farmlands of Orry provide the phentomites with the majority of that world’s important resources, food and natural fibers, while the largest landmasses each contain at least a few mines. Phentomite cities range from the idyllic Niyriki, an artists’ enclave on the shores of Lake Eclipse, to the industrious Qabu, full of bustling factories. Roads of an unknown material crisscross each land formation; these remnants of Orry’s past have withstood the test of time and are now used by travelers on foot and by wagons pulled by hefty six-legged draft animals.

Travel between the floating islands is made possible by an elite class of phentomites called bridgers, who use death-defying acrobatics to cross the gaps between landmasses and erect temporary rope-and-wood structures. Even with the assistance of bridgers, these trips can take several months to complete, and the largest, slowest-moving islands come close to one another for only a short time each year. Such a journey is incredibly hazardous, as a single slip can send an unfortunate traveler plummeting toward Orry’s gravitational anomaly—a certain death.

The Pact Worlds only recently made contact with phentomites. AbadarCorp has constructed a small space station named Harmony-One that orbits Orry. Due to the gravitational anomaly at the heart of the cluster, landing starships on any of the Orry’s surfaces is incredibly hazardous. Orry’s trade partners have agreed to land offworld vessels only in a phentomitedesignated area outside of Zisfahani, Orry’s largest city. Travel to other landmasses must then proceed along terrestrial routes, with the aid of local phentomite bridgers.

Phentomite

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 200

NG Medium humanoid (phentomite)

Init.: +3 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +9

Defense

HP: 12

EAC: 10 KAC: 11

Fort: +0 Ref: +3 Will: +2

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: club +2 (1d6+1 B)

Ranged: tactical semi-auto pistol +4 (1d6 P)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +3 Con: +0 Wis: +2 Int: +1 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +9, Athletics +9, Culture +4, Engineering +4, Survival +9

Languages: Orrian

Gear: club, tactical semi-auto pistol with 18 small arm rounds

Ecology

Environment: any (Orry)

Organization: solitary or raft (2–5)

Special Abilities

Acclimated (Ex) Phentomites are acclimated to thin atmospheres and high altitudes, and they count as Small creatures for the purpose of slow suffocation.

Heat Tracker (Ex) As a full action, a phentomite can alter her vision to detect the latent heat trails left by passing creatures. This allows the phentomite to use the Perception skill to perform the follow tracks task of the Survival skill and also functions as the tracking universal creature rule. While this ability is active, the phentomite takes a –1 penalty to Reflex saving throws. The phentomite can deactivate this ability as a move action.

Description

Phentomites are native inhabitants of Orry, an unusual cluster of landmasses floating in regular orbits around a gravitational anomaly in Near Space. Thousands of years ago, the planet Orry was a technomagical utopia, but a massive industrial accident caused much of the world’s mass to explode into space. However, mystical gravitational forces created in this disaster allowed the land that survived to remain inhabitable, albeit with a thin atmosphere. Orry now consists of 10 country-sized landmasses, along with several dozen smaller formations, that slowly rotate around a central point—sometimes coming within mere feet of one another but never colliding.

Orry’s surviving population continued on in the subsequent centuries, though the society lost much of the scientific and magical advancement of its forebears. The phentomites of today live in nations engaged in relatively low-tech artisanship, farming, and trading. They adapted to the low-oxygen environment much as creatures who live their whole lives at high altitudes do. Their eyes have adjusted to be able to see in the dark, and they’ve developed specialized nerves that grant limited thermographic vision; the latter might be a mutation caused by arcane fallout from Orry’s planet-breaking accident.

The typical phentomite is 7 feet tall and weighs 175 pounds. Though mostly blue, a phentomite’s skin is striated with other colors, especially across the chest and arms. These streaks vary in coloration between phentomites from different areas of the planet; some have green and yellow bands, while others have red and purple lines of color. Their backward-bending legs give them a natural ability to jump farther than most humanoids, and their ungual feet grant them purchase on rocky slopes. Phentomites often decorate their large forehead ridges with dangling charms of religious or personal significance.

The farmlands of Orry provide the phentomites with the majority of that world’s important resources, food and natural fibers, while the largest landmasses each contain at least a few mines. Phentomite cities range from the idyllic Niyriki, an artists’ enclave on the shores of Lake Eclipse, to the industrious Qabu, full of bustling factories. Roads of an unknown material crisscross each land formation; these remnants of Orry’s past have withstood the test of time and are now used by travelers on foot and by wagons pulled by hefty six-legged draft animals.

Travel between the floating islands is made possible by an elite class of phentomites called bridgers, who use death-defying acrobatics to cross the gaps between landmasses and erect temporary rope-and-wood structures. Even with the assistance of bridgers, these trips can take several months to complete, and the largest, slowest-moving islands come close to one another for only a short time each year. Such a journey is incredibly hazardous, as a single slip can send an unfortunate traveler plummeting toward Orry’s gravitational anomaly—a certain death.

The Pact Worlds only recently made contact with phentomites. AbadarCorp has constructed a small space station named Harmony-One that orbits Orry. Due to the gravitational anomaly at the heart of the cluster, landing starships on any of the Orry’s surfaces is incredibly hazardous. Orry’s trade partners have agreed to land offworld vessels only in a phentomitedesignated area outside of Zisfahani, Orry’s largest city. Travel to other landmasses must then proceed along terrestrial routes, with the aid of local phentomite bridgers.

Plasma Ooze

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 16 XP: 76,800

N Gargantuan ooze

Init.: +5 Senses: blindsight (thought) 60 ft., sightless Perception: +28

Aura: electromagnetic field (100 ft., DC 22)

Defense

HP: 305

EAC: 30 KAC: 32

Fort: +20 Ref: +16 Will: +12

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 60 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: slam +27 (5d8+23 E & F; critical severe wound [DC 22])

Ranged: plasma pulse +30 (10d6+16 E & F; critical severe wound [DC 22])

Offensive Abilities: magnetic draw

Statistics

Str: +7 Dex: +5 Con: +10 Wis: +0 Int:Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +28 (+36 to fly), Piloting +28 (to navigate only)

Ecology

Environment: any solar or vacuum

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Electromagnetic Field (Ex) A plasma ooze generates a massive electromagnetic field that disrupts electronics and interferes with signals. Electronic signals, such as those employed by comm units, do not function within this area. When a creature activates an object with charges that is in the area, that object must succeed at a DC 22 Reflex save or it is drained of all charges and the action is lost. A technological construct that begins its turn in this area must succeed at a DC 22 Reflex save or be staggered and unable to use energy-based attacks for 1d4 rounds. A creature or object that succeeds at its saving throw is immune to the plasma ooze’s electromagnetic field for 24 hours.

Magnetic Draw (Ex) As a move action, a plasma ooze can draw all Medium and smaller creatures and unattended objects of no more than light bulk that are within 100 feet up to 30 feet toward itself (Reflex DC 22 negates; this DC increases by 5 for technological constructs and technological items).

Plasma Drain (Ex) Once per day as a full action, a plasma ooze can drain the charges of plasma weapons within 100 feet to regain a number of Hit Points equal to the most charges drained from any one battery. Each weapon can attempt a DC 22 Reflex saving throw to negate this effect for that weapon.

Plasma Pulse (Ex) A plasma ooze’s plasma pulse is a ranged attack with a range increment of 60 feet and the severe wound critical hit effect.

Description

Enormous crackling lattices of electromagnetic energy, plasma oozes are significant threats to even the Pact Worlds’ most experienced spacefarers. Usually taking a roughly spherical form, a plasma ooze pulses with a brilliant array of pink, purple, and blue light, connected in a complex network that reaches whitehot intensity at its many nodes. These oozes are most often seen in the immediate vicinity of a star’s surface, but explorers have occasionally sighted the mysterious beings hovering near powerful electromagnetic phenomena in numerous system, both in the vacuum of space and on the surfaces of volatile planetoids. A typical plasma ooze is a rough hemisphere approximately 20 feet in diameter, weighing close to 100 tons.

The origin of these oozes has been hotly debated since before the Gap, with ancient scholars speculating that the creatures originated on the Plane of Fire and were drawn to an inhabited system’s sun. However, nearly a century ago, the discovery of deserted cities within the sun of the Pact Worlds—along with modern claims by Plane of Fire natives that yet more civilizations exist in deeper layers of the sun—spawned a host of new theories, as abundant as the oozes are rare.

One of the most popular hypotheses is that the sun’s abandoned cities, now called the Burning Archipelago, were the site of an ancient civilization’s attempts to harness the power of the star. As proponents of this story would have it, the experimenters were successful in creating the first plasma oozes, but they soon lost control of their creations and were quickly eradicated by the beings. Supposedly, the unleashed plasma oozes not only shut down the technological defenses of their creators, but also wiped out the digitally stored collective knowledge upon which the civilization relied for its continued survival. This version of events, though based almost entirely on conjecture and unable to explain plasma oozes’ presence in other systems, is nonetheless often cited by those who caution against an overdependence on technology.

Such theories are met with vehement opposition by Sarenites, many of whom believe the Dawnflower herself created the sun’s cities and would not have permitted such a fate to befall them. Some of Sarenrae’s worshipers believe that the goddess created the plasma oozes too, making them custodians of the Archipelago and solar sites in other systems, and that whatever emptied the sun’s cities did so despite the oozes’ protection.

Plasma ooze sightings often occur at the perimeter of a star just before massive flares occur, leading many to believe that the two are connected somehow. Some of Sarenrae’s worshipers claim that the oozes themselves draw out such flares in a search for some artifact buried deep with the sun, while more recent evidence points to the flares being involved in their reproduction.

Several centuries ago, shortly after Drift travel became widespread, a small residential starship on a routine trip through the Drift reported encountering an enormous plasma ooze, many times larger than those of the Pact Worlds’ sun. Since then, a sighting is made every few decades on average, with the ooze’s reported size gradually increasing each time. How the plasma ooze entered the Drift in the first place is an open question; while most agree that the ooze must have been ripped from the Material Plane by the activation of a Drift engine, some suspect a deeper connection between the ooze and the Drift, normally accessible only by technology granted by the ascended AI god Triune. A few scholars even posit that the creature’s distortion of electromagnetic fields somehow granted it access to the Drift. Plasma oozes’ strong electromagnetic field makes them extremely dangerous to encounter in the vacuum of space, since even shielded starships can find themselves adrift after crossing paths with one. Similarly, in the rare instances when a plasma ooze takes up residence on a populated planet’s surface, the edges of its territory are often marked by the dusty hulls of disabled vehicles, their former owners having wisely abandoned them to live another day. Few living creatures survive contact with a plasma ooze, but those that do often bear terrible wounds that serve as permanent reminders of such oozes’ fearsome power.

A small group of planar scions whose ancestry connects them to the Plane of Fire, and who have served in various military forces, has recently claimed to be actively hunting plasma oozes under the moniker “the Sunkillers.” They have stockpiled electricity-resistant armor and defensive gear to complement their natural tolerance for fire, and they are currently amassing powerful sonic weaponry that they are confident will bypass the creatures’ formidable defenses. Even with their preparations and experience, they are taking a considerable risk for what seems to be little reward—though anyone who could reliably take on a plasma ooze could likely charge a hefty fee for the service.

Plesiosaur

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

N Huge animal

Init.: +2 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +14

Defense

HP: 105

EAC: 19 KAC: 21

Fort: +12 Ref: +10 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 20 ft., swim 50 ft.

Melee: bite +16 (2d6+12 P)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +2 Con: +4 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +19 (+27 to swim)

Ecology

Environment: any water

Organization: solitary, pair, or school (3–6)

Description

The term “dinosaur” refers to a category of reptilelike fauna associated with a planet’s prehistoric evolutionary scale. Dinosaurs vary in size, although many are quite large, and they come in a variety of forms. A ceratopsid is a quadruped that has bony frills extending from its head back over its shoulders, as well as horns that adorn its face; one example is the herbivorous triceratops. Dromaeosaurids are bipedal, feathered carnivores, like the pack-hunting deinonychus (also called a raptor). Plesiosaurs are marine reptiles with long necks and toothy mouths that dwell and hunt near the water’s surface. Pterosaurs are flying reptilian beasts with membranous wings and long, sharp, triangular beaks. Sauropods are immense, lumbering quadrupeds with long necks and tails and towering stature, such as brachiosaurus and diplodocus. Theropods are bipedal dinosaurs, generally carnivorous, with fearsome, fanged jaws and clawed digits, like the tyrannosaurus. Thyreophorans are quadrupedal dinosaurs with armor-plated backs and tails weaponized with bludgeoning bone or piercing spikes, including the ankylosaurus and the stegosaurus.

The dinosaurs in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique dinosaur, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts. Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

Pluprex

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 13 XP: 25,600

CE Medium outsider (chaotic)

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +23

Aura: radiation (20 ft.)

Defense

HP: 190

EAC: 26 KAC: 27

Fort: +16 Ref: +12 Will: +14

Offense

Speed: 50 ft., fly 60 ft. (Su, average)

Melee: bite +23 (6d4+19 S plus invoke mutation)

Offensive Abilities: invoke mutation

Statistics

Str: +6 Dex: +4 Con: +4 Wis: +2 Int: +3 Cha: +8

Skills: Acrobatics +23, Bluff +28, Intimidate +28, Life Science +23, Mysticism +23

Languages: Abyssal, Celestial, Draconic; telepathy 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any (Abyss)

Organization: solitary, pair, blight (3–6), or invasion (2–4 pluprexes plus 3–6 prexian mutantspawns)

Special Abilities

Invoke Mutation (Su) A pluprex can wrack a living creature by biting it. The creature bitten must attempt a DC 21 Fortitude save. On a success, the creature is merely sickened for 1 round. On a failure, the victim’s body undergoes several swift and painful mutations that twist limbs, alter organs, and distort features into a hideous countenance, giving it the overburdened condition for 1 minute. After this minute elapses, the creature becomes accustomed to its twisted new body, but it gains the encumbered condition permanently. This is a curse effect; its effects do not stack.

Irradiate Dead (Su) Undead creatures created by a pluprex are radioactive, emitting low radiation in a 20-foot radius. Once per day as a standard action, a pluprex can touch an undead creature it has created to enhance that creature’s radioactive aura, permanently increasing that creature’s radioactivity to medium. A pluprex cannot enhance radiation in this way to a higher level. Alternatively, the pluprex can give any undead creature a medium radioactive aura by touching it, but such auras last for only 24 hours before fading.

Radiation Aura (Su) A pluprex emits medium radiation in a 20-foot radius. Once per day as a swift action, a pluprex can instead emit high radiation for 1 minute.

Description

Predator Swarm

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 2 XP: 600

N Tiny animal (swarm)

Init.: +1 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +7

Defense

HP: 25

EAC: 12 KAC: 14

Fort: +4 Ref: +4 Will: +1

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: swarm attack (1d6 P or S)

Offensive Abilities: distraction

Statistics

Str: -2 Dex: +1 Con: +1 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Acrobatics +7, Athletics +7, Stealth +7

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, pack (3–6), or infestation (7–12)

Description

From the vortex sharks of Kalo-Mahoi to the hoarbats of Verces’s Darkside, and from the dire tigers of Castrovel to the tremor worms of Akiton, predators abound in the Pact Worlds and on planets across the galaxy. What unites these disparate species is that their diets include the meat of other creatures and that they hunt and kill to acquire this food. On planets where sapient species are dominant, predators have learned that weapon-wielding creatures can be deadly prey. Other predators, deprived of such contact, often see sentient explorers as an unfamiliar form of potential sustenance, making confrontations inevitable.

Predators come in all shapes and sizes, limited only by the environment where they are found. Bigger predators rely on abundant food, cycles of inactivity, an omnivorous diet, or a combination of these. Smaller predators have fewer requirements and can be equally dangerous; even very small animals can evolve pack tactics to overwhelm larger and stronger creatures. Some of these swarms, such as the flying viper eels of Bretheda, strip flesh from bone as they move over and around prey.

The predators in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique predator, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, from claws to slams, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts. Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

The vortex shark is a slim, cartilaginous fish that lives in the depths of Kalo-Mahoi’s oceans. The creature is bioluminescent and has a four-part jaw with rows of hooked teeth. A vortex shark’s natural weapon is a bite that deals slashing damage, has the bleed 1d6 critical hit effect, and allows the shark’s teeth to grab ahold of a target. The female of the species grows larger than the male and lays eggs in pouches she leaves behind. Young fend for themselves when they hatch, catching weaker siblings for a first meal. An adult vortex shark is a Large aquatic predator, averaging 12 feet in length and 1,000 pounds in weight. The sharks can breathe only water and have a land speed of 0 feet and a swim speed of 60 feet. Living in Kalo-Mahoi’s seas has inured them to cold (resistance 5 to cold), and they have blindsense (scent) out to 30 feet and the tracking (scent) special ability for waterborne prey, which they use mostly to hunt bleeding creatures.

Prexian Mutantspawn

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 11 XP: 12,800

CE Medium outsider (chaotic)

Init.: +3 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., blindsense (scent) 60 ft. Perception: +20

Defense

HP: 155

EAC: 23 KAC: 24

Fort: +14 Ref: +10 Will: +12

Offense

Speed: 10 ft., fly 40 ft. (Ex, average)

Melee: numbing taclash +20 (5d4 S plus irradiation) or bite +20 (2d10+16 S plus irradiation)

Offensive Abilities:

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +3 Con: +8 Wis: +2 Int: +1 Cha: +3

Skills: Acrobatics +20, Bluff +20, Intimidate +20, Mysticism +20, Sense Motive +20

Languages: Abyssal, Celestial, Draconic; telepathy 100 ft.

Gear: numbing taclash with 2 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any (Abyss)

Organization: solitary, pair, or infection (3–8)

Special Abilities

Irradiation (Su) A creature bitten by a prexian mutantspawn or wounded by a melee weapon a mutantspawn carries must succeed at a DC 20 Fortitude save or be exposed to a sudden pulse of supernatural radiation. This functions as medium radiation that affects only the mutantspawn’s target.

Description

Pterosaur

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 3 XP: 800

N Large animal

Init.: +4 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +8

Defense

HP: 40

EAC: 14 KAC: 16

Fort: +5 Ref: +8 Will: +2

Offense

Speed: 10 ft., fly 50 ft. (Ex, clumsy)

Melee: bite +10 (1d6+5 P)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +4 Con: +0 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Acrobatics +13 (+5 to fly)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or flock (3–8)

Description

The term “dinosaur” refers to a category of reptilelike fauna associated with a planet’s prehistoric evolutionary scale. Dinosaurs vary in size, although many are quite large, and they come in a variety of forms. A ceratopsid is a quadruped that has bony frills extending from its head back over its shoulders, as well as horns that adorn its face; one example is the herbivorous triceratops. Dromaeosaurids are bipedal, feathered carnivores, like the pack-hunting deinonychus (also called a raptor). Plesiosaurs are marine reptiles with long necks and toothy mouths that dwell and hunt near the water’s surface. Pterosaurs are flying reptilian beasts with membranous wings and long, sharp, triangular beaks. Sauropods are immense, lumbering quadrupeds with long necks and tails and towering stature, such as brachiosaurus and diplodocus. Theropods are bipedal dinosaurs, generally carnivorous, with fearsome, fanged jaws and clawed digits, like the tyrannosaurus. Thyreophorans are quadrupedal dinosaurs with armor-plated backs and tails weaponized with bludgeoning bone or piercing spikes, including the ankylosaurus and the stegosaurus.

The dinosaurs in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique dinosaur, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts. Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

Quorlu Sapper

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 9 XP: 6,400

N Medium monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +1 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +22

Defense

HP: 145 RP: 4

EAC: 22 KAC: 24, +4 vs. bull rush, reposition, trip

Fort: +11 Ref: +9 Will: +10, +2 vs. bleed

Offense

Speed: 25 ft.

Melee: mk 2 heat-amp gauntlet +18 (2d6+12 B & F; critical burn 1d8)

Ranged: red star plasma cannon +21 (explode [5 ft., 2d10+9 E & F, DC 16]; critical burn 1d8) or frag grenade III +21 (explode [15 ft., 4d6 P, DC 16])

Offensive Abilities: debilitating attack (DC 16, 3 rounds), fighting styles (bombard, hit-and-run), gear boosts (plasma immolation [1d8], powerful explosive), grenade expert (35 ft.), heavy fire (+3 damage), opening volley

Statistics

Str: +3 Dex: +4 Con: +6 Wis: +0 Int: +1 Cha: +1

Skills: Athletics +22, Engineering +17, Intimidate +17

Languages: Common, Quorlu

Gear: advanced iridishell, mk 2 heat-amp gauntlet, red star plasma cannon with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each), frag grenades III (2), detonator, explosives (frag III [2])

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or team (3–5)

Special Abilities

Endothermic (Ex) A quorlu has resistance 5 to fire that stacks with one other source of fire resistance.

Lithic (Ex) A quorlu’s silicon-based physiology grants it immunity to disease and poison, and it gains no benefit from drugs, medicinals, and similar nonmagical substances. It also gains a +2 racial bonus to saving throws against bleed effects. A quorlu doesn’t breathe or suffer the normal environmental effects of being in a vacuum.

Stable (Ex) A quorlu gains a +4 racial bonus to AC against combat maneuvers to bull rush, reposition, or trip.

Susceptible to Cold (Ex) When a quorlu takes cold damage, it becomes fatigued for 1 round. This effect doesn’t cause a fatigued quorlu to become exhausted.

Tunneler (Ex) A quorlu can dig through soil at a rate of 5 feet per minute. A quorlu can use this ability combined with its internal heat to dig through stone at a rate of 1 foot per minute. When it digs, a quorlu can leave a tunnel behind.

Description

Quorlus are quadrupedal, silicon-based creatures that have three tentacular arms and three eyestalks. They hail from Quorlosh, a strange world in the Vast that is highly geologically active but has only a thin atmosphere. Quorlus live in warrens in the planet’s exposed stony crust, where they delve for minerals that they consume for sustenance. Their warrens are like the settlements of many humanoids, and their inhabitants conduct crystal farming in which they “grow” gypsum, quartzes, and salts for food. The average quorlu is 4-1/2 feet tall and weighs 350 pounds.

Their planet’s violent tectonic activity has instilled quorlus with a cultural acceptance of impermanence and resilience to loss. Quorlus value experiences more than material possessions, though by the standards of other worlds, they have abundant raw wealth. When a lava flow or quake damages a quorlu settlement, the quorlus dig out and repair, though they are too practical to rebuild where destruction is likely to occur again.

Quorlus have a crystalline lithic shell that is vulnerable to certain sonic frequencies. Under this exterior, quorlus’ crystal-fiber organ structures float in plasma. At the center is the quorlu’s grinding heart, which serves as both a circulatory and a digestive organ and which generates the quorlu’s high internal heat. Extreme cold can slow a quorlu’s endothermic reactions, momentarily hindering the creature.

Although quorlus can be tough combatants, few truly enjoy battle. Their extant military traditions stem from their engineering customs and emphasize the use of explosives, but they usually prefer peace and positive new experiences. This societal tendency makes them more inclined to be diplomats and explorers than warriors.

Supplementing quorlus’ peaceful inclinations is the fact that most other sapient species find their voices soothing, especially when those voices are harmonized in song—and quorlus love to sing. Their language is melodic, tonal, and trilling, and it also includes subtle vibrations that shirrens in particular find especially pleasing thanks to their sensitivity to delicate vibrational shifts. The range of quorlu tones makes their language difficult for non-quorlus to master.

Quorlus can be found throughout the Pact Worlds. They have an enclave and diplomatic corps on Absalom Station, and numerous quorlus join exploration outfits, including the Starfinder Society. Others serve as prospectors in the Diaspora and on inhospitable worlds. Quorlus are quick to volunteer for jobs inherently more hazardous for species that need to breathe or that are more susceptible to poison or disease.

Quorlus have developed

, unleashing it in hand-to-hand combat. Notorious for their use of these weapons, quorlu infiltrators and sappers also use heat-amp gauntlets to start fires to hinder their enemies.

Quorlu

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 2 XP: 600

N Medium monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +0 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +12

Defense

HP: 23

EAC: 13 KAC: 14, +4 vs. bull rush, reposition, trip

Fort: +3 Ref: +1 Will: +7, +2 vs. bleed

Offense

Speed: 25 ft.

Melee: mk 1 heat-amp gauntlet +9 (1d6+2 B & F; critical burn 1d4)

Ranged: static arc pistol +7 (1d6+2 E; critical arc 2)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +0 Con: +4 Wis: +0 Int: +1 Cha: +2

Skills: Athletics +7, Computers +7, Diplomacy +12, Physical Science +12, Sense Motive +12

Languages: Common, Quorlu

Gear: freebooter armor I, heat-amp gauntlet, static arc pistol with 2 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or team (3–5)

Special Abilities

Endothermic (Ex) A quorlu has resistance 5 to fire that stacks with one other source of fire resistance.

Lithic (Ex) A quorlu’s silicon-based physiology grants it immunity to disease and poison, and it gains no benefit from drugs, medicinals, and similar nonmagical substances. It also gains a +2 racial bonus to saving throws against bleed effects. A quorlu doesn’t breathe or suffer the normal environmental effects of being in a vacuum.

Stable (Ex) A quorlu gains a +4 racial bonus to AC against combat maneuvers to bull rush, reposition, or trip.

Susceptible to Cold (Ex) When a quorlu takes cold damage, it becomes fatigued for 1 round. This effect doesn’t cause a fatigued quorlu to become exhausted.

Tunneler (Ex) A quorlu can dig through soil at a rate of 5 feet per minute. A quorlu can use this ability combined with its internal heat to dig through stone at a rate of 1 foot per minute. When it digs, a quorlu can leave a tunnel behind.

Description

Quorlus are quadrupedal, silicon-based creatures that have three tentacular arms and three eyestalks. They hail from Quorlosh, a strange world in the Vast that is highly geologically active but has only a thin atmosphere. Quorlus live in warrens in the planet’s exposed stony crust, where they delve for minerals that they consume for sustenance. Their warrens are like the settlements of many humanoids, and their inhabitants conduct crystal farming in which they “grow” gypsum, quartzes, and salts for food. The average quorlu is 4-1/2 feet tall and weighs 350 pounds.

Their planet’s violent tectonic activity has instilled quorlus with a cultural acceptance of impermanence and resilience to loss. Quorlus value experiences more than material possessions, though by the standards of other worlds, they have abundant raw wealth. When a lava flow or quake damages a quorlu settlement, the quorlus dig out and repair, though they are too practical to rebuild where destruction is likely to occur again.

Quorlus have a crystalline lithic shell that is vulnerable to certain sonic frequencies. Under this exterior, quorlus’ crystal-fiber organ structures float in plasma. At the center is the quorlu’s grinding heart, which serves as both a circulatory and a digestive organ and which generates the quorlu’s high internal heat. Extreme cold can slow a quorlu’s endothermic reactions, momentarily hindering the creature.

Although quorlus can be tough combatants, few truly enjoy battle. Their extant military traditions stem from their engineering customs and emphasize the use of explosives, but they usually prefer peace and positive new experiences. This societal tendency makes them more inclined to be diplomats and explorers than warriors.

Supplementing quorlus’ peaceful inclinations is the fact that most other sapient species find their voices soothing, especially when those voices are harmonized in song—and quorlus love to sing. Their language is melodic, tonal, and trilling, and it also includes subtle vibrations that shirrens in particular find especially pleasing thanks to their sensitivity to delicate vibrational shifts. The range of quorlu tones makes their language difficult for non-quorlus to master.

Quorlus can be found throughout the Pact Worlds. They have an enclave and diplomatic corps on Absalom Station, and numerous quorlus join exploration outfits, including the Starfinder Society. Others serve as prospectors in the Diaspora and on inhospitable worlds. Quorlus are quick to volunteer for jobs inherently more hazardous for species that need to breathe or that are more susceptible to poison or disease.

Quorlus have developed

, unleashing it in hand-to-hand combat. Notorious for their use of these weapons, quorlu infiltrators and sappers also use heat-amp gauntlets to start fires to hinder their enemies.

Shantak

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

CE Huge magical (beast)

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +16

Defense

HP: 125

EAC: 20 KAC: 22

Fort: +12 Ref: +12 Will: +7

Offense

Speed: 20 ft., fly 80 ft. (Su, average)

Melee: bite +20 (3d4+14 P) or talons +20 (3d4+14 S plus grab)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +6 Dex: +2 Con: +4 Wis: +2 Int: -1 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +21, Piloting +16 (to navigate only)

Languages: Aklo

Ecology

Environment: cold mountains or vacuum

Organization: solitary, pair, or flock (3–12)

Special Abilities

Share Defenses (Su) As a swift action, a shantak can grant a single creature touching it void adaptation for as long as the creature remains in contact. The shantak can withdraw this protection as a free action.

Slippery (Ex) A shantak’s scales seep slippery slime, granting it a +8 bonus to Acrobatics checks to escape and imposing a –5 penalty to all Survival checks to ride the shantak.

Description

Shantaks are bizarre, winged creatures that seem to be an incongruous blend of reptile and bird. Although shantaks appear ungainly on land when perched on their two legs, their vast, bat-like wings enable the creatures to soar gracefully through vacuum as easily as they fly in atmospheres. Slimy scales cover a shantak’s body, and its vaguely horselike head features a wide maw filled with dagger-like teeth. A shantak is about 30 feet long from nose to tail and weighs approximately 6,000 pounds. Planetside, shantaks inhabit remote and foreboding mountain peaks, but their ability to survive in and fly through vacuum means they can also be found in the void of space.

Despite their bestial appearances, shantaks are intelligent, and speak in shrill voices that sound like glass grinding against stone. They are willful creatures and cannot simply be trained as mounts. A would-be shantak rider must first seek out a shantak, braving its lair or hunting grounds, and then use diplomacy or magic to secure a shantak’s cooperation as a mount, often with a liberal dose of flattery. Even then, shantaks have a tendency to deliberately strand riders in dangerous areas, or worse, revoke their shared defenses while in the depths of space so their riders asphyxiate and swiftly perish. The flesh of such unfortunate riders is particularly delightful to a shantak, especially if it is able to feed where the rider’s one-time allies and friends can watch.

Many shantaks have a strange and irrational fear of certain humanoid winged creatures, such as faceless nightgaunts said to dwell in certain dreams, or specific types of winged humanoids more common in civilized regions. While these irrational fears are usually not so overwhelming as to have physical or mental effects on a shantak, shantaks do take pains to avoid confrontations with these other types of creatures if at all possible.

Shantaks’ ability to travel the gulf of space ensures that these scaly creatures can be found on numerous worlds and their satellites. Yet despite this ability, shantaks are generally quite reluctant to seek out new worlds on their own unless faced with no other option, for a shantak knows well that an attempt to fly to an unknown world could easily result in being lost forever in the depths of space. Before the widespread use of Drift technology, some species employed shantaks as a rare and dangerous method of traveling among the stars, and there may well be as-yet-undiscovered civilizations in the Vast that continue to do so—perhaps because their technological advancement has not reached a level where they can use Drift travel.

Curiously, even those who have never encountered a shantak in real life often know of these creatures, for shantaks dwell in the shared dreams of slumbering minds as surely as in the depths of space. Some scientists and philosophers have gone so as far as to suggest that shantaks first hailed from a mysterious shared demiplane within the Dimension of Dreams called the Dreamlands. These scholars further posit that eerie and dangerous rituals have enabled the creatures to transform themselves from figments imagined by sleeping minds into creatures that exist in the waking world on countless planets.

Although shantaks do not enjoy the presence of active starships—almost as if the energies exuded by an active power core cause them some sort of intense discomfort— shantaks are quite fond of derelict ships. Large numbers of shantaks have been reported to roost in the nooks and crannies of a drifting hulk’s hull, and exploration of the interior of these abandoned ships often reveals truly disturbing “caches” of food—the partially eaten remains of entire crews. Shantaks that roost in derelict starships take full advantage of their adoptive homes, ensuring their nests are well hidden from observation. These shantaks can be quite cunning in dressing the hulk in what appears to be valuable scrap, and some have even learned to tamper with shipboard alarm systems to send out false distress signals. The most cunning and dangerous of these drifting traps arise when the shantaks forge an alliance with another creature, often an undead created when a starship is destroyed. A shantak flock can wing off to distant worlds to retrieve rare necessities for their allies, returning via spaceflight to keep the denizen of a stranded derelict well supplied in luxuries that, without their own ship to command, they would otherwise be forced to forgo.

Shipmind

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 13 XP: 25,600

CE Huge ooze

Init.: +6 Senses: blindsight (life) 60 ft., detect alignment Perception: +23

Defense

HP: 225

EAC: 27 KAC: 29

Fort: +15 Ref: +17 Will: +10

Offense

Speed: 0 ft. (10 ft. outside of container)

Melee: slam +26 (3d12+21 B plus grab and thought disruption)

Ranged: plasma bolt +23 (5d6+13 E & F; critical burn 1d10)

Offensive Abilities: immerse

Statistics

Str: +8 Dex: +6 Con: +4 Wis: +4 Int: +3 Cha: +3

Skills: Computers +23, Engineering +23, Mysticism +23, Piloting +28, Sense Motive +23

Languages: Abyssal, Aklo, Common, Draconic, Drow, Infernal; telepathy 60 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any (Dominion of the Black starships)

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Confined (Ex) A shipmind dwells within an immobile container. While inside its container, a shipmind has a speed of 0 feet. When it leaves its container, it gains a speed of 10 feet and takes a –10 penalty to AC. A shipmind can live outside of its container for 1 hour without consequences, but at the start of each subsequent hour, it gains 1 negative level as it slowly dissolves. This process can be reversed only if the shipmind returns to its container, where the shipmind can then remove 1 negative level per hour. The container has hardness 10 and 60 Hit Points, and a creature that targets the container with a melee or ranged weapon attack automatically hits it. The crystalline nature of the container makes it vulnerable to sonic damage. A shipmind in a container that has the broken condition takes a –5 penalty to AC.

Immerse (Ex) When a shipmind in its container successfully grabs a Large or smaller target with one of its slam attacks and pins the target, it can drag that target into its body as a swift action, dealing 6d6 damage (Fortitude DC 19 half), half of which is electricity and half of which is fire, and subjecting the target to thought disruption. A creature that remains immersed takes this damage again at the start of each of the shipmind’s turns. In addition, an immersed creature without environmental protections is in danger of suffocating. A creature can attempt Acrobatics checks to escape immersion as if escaping from being pinned, gaining a +5 circumstance bonus if the shipmind’s container has the broken condition.

Plasma Bolt (Ex) A shipmind’s plasma bolt has a range increment of 80 feet.

Ship Interface (Ex) While a shipmind is interfaced with a Dominion starship, it can observe events anywhere within the vessel, as well as within 90 feet of its exterior hull, as if using clairaudience/clairvoyance for as long as the shipmind concentrates. The shipmind’s detect alignment works through its remote sensor at the same range. While concentrating on an area, the shipmind can activate ship systems in that area as a swift action. In addition, the shipmind can converse with creatures in the area by vibrating the walls (or the hull while in atmosphere). In addition, during starship combat in a Dominion ship with which it is interfaced, a shipmind can take up to 5 crew actions, none of which can be captain actions.

Thought Disruption (Su) A shipmind’s alien psyche is disruptive to the minds of most other life-forms. A creature that touches or is hit by the ooze must succeed at a DC 19 Will saving throw or take 1d4 Wisdom damage. This is a mind-affecting effect.

Description

A shipmind is an ooze of thick, bubbling yellowish liquid. Unlike many oozes, this biological entity relies on a bizarre symbiosis with technology to survive. The creature lives in a container made of crystalline material and inorganic components, which serves the ooze like a shell. Outside this container, a shipmind is vulnerable and doomed to die, but this limited existence is little hindrance to a shipmind, since its sole purpose is to pilot starfaring vessels that serve the Dominion of the Black.

Dominion starships are bizarre amalgamations of organic and inorganic components. Strange membranes hold bulkheads and the hull together. Fibrous material resembling muscles and connective tissue work some of the ships’ mechanical components, such as doors, while a web of nerve-like cables carry power and data, and networks of tubules carry various fluids. At the center of this network in the largest Dominion ships is a shipmind, connected to everything through disturbingly organic cables.

A shipmind has an intimate connection to its starship and can survive as long as its craft does, sometimes for many centuries. The creatures are cruel even to their supposed allies, and they are given to fits of inexplicable behavior.

Seeders are the most common large Dominion starships. Some are scouts or assault vessels with only a shipmind aboard, while others travel with a crew of other entities affiliated with the Dominion of the Black. These ships land on life-rich planets, unleashing Dominion-allied creatures to infest the region around the landing site, assimilating native organisms.

Shotalashu

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 2 XP: 600

N Large magical (beast)

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +12

Defense

HP: 25

EAC: 13 KAC: 15

Fort: +6 Ref: +6 Will: +1

Offense

Speed: 60 ft.

Melee: claws +11 (1d6+3 S)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +4 Con: +2 Wis: +1 Int: -3 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +7, Perception +12, Stealth +7

Languages: Lashunta (can’t speak)

Ecology

Environment: warm forests (Castrovel)

Organization: solitary, bonded mount (1 plus 1 lashunta), or pack (3–5)

Special Abilities

Jungle Strider (Ex) Shotalashus are adept at traversing all forms of forest terrain. While in forest terrain, a shotalashu’s speed is not impeded by natural difficult terrain such as undergrowth.

Telepathic Link (Su) A lashunta can spend 1 hour and attempt a Survival check (DC 15 + 1-1/2 the shotalashu’s CR) to form a telepathic bond with an unbound shotalashu. If the lashunta is successful, the rider’s link functions as telepathic bond

Description

For as long as lashuntas have been among the dominant species on Castrovel, shotalashus—the lashuntas’ traditional telepathic reptilian mounts—have served at their sides. Millennia of domestication and parallel evolution have strengthened the symbiotic bond between the two species, allowing lashuntas to form a close mental link with a chosen mount.

Shotalashus have rudimentary telepathic abilities similar to those of the lashuntas themselves, a fact that has contributed to their use as close pets and trusted mounts even in the modern day, when much more sophisticated and technologically advanced forms of both transportation and companionship exist. This tradition has lasted so long in part because of the kinship the lashuntas feel with their bonded shotalashus, but also because the symbiotic bond between the two species is deeply ingrained into lashunta culture. Shotalashu-mounted cavalry still serve as ceremonial honor guards for lashunta dignitaries, and members of all social stations regard their bonded mounts as occupying a cherished place in the family. Though shotalashus are seen less often in teeming metropolises than they are in smaller settlements, no city on Castrovel is devoid of at least basic amenities for the honored beasts, from training facilities to boarding services.

While it’s common for a lashunta to switch between shotalashus throughout her life, some bonds between beast and rider deepen over time, and it is not unheard of for a warrior to bond with a single shotalashu mount until death. Lashunta whose mounts die suffer psychic trauma and often require time to recover before they can bond with another mount, and shotalashus who lose their bonded riders have been known to grieve for months, or even years.

Though rare, some shotalashus still live in the wild, forming feral packs that use their telepathy to bond not with a rider, but with one another, forming a highly effective collective mind that makes them efficient and deadly hunters. Particularly adventurous lashuntas set out on solo quests into the most remote of Castrovel’s wilds in search of a potentially stronger mount from among untamed stock. These brave souls must first break an individual shotalashu away from its pack before attempting the long and arduous task of taming and eventually bonding with the creature.

A typical domesticated shotalashu is over 10 feet long from snout to tail-tip, and weighs more than 1,000 pounds, while wild specimens can grow as large as 12 feet in length and weigh a staggering 1,500 pounds.

As technology has advanced, telepathic bonding with shotalashus has become possible for those who aren’t lashunta. The lashuntas have also maintained traditional gear for shotalashu riding: the

and the

.

Siege Robot

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 15 XP: 51,200

N Huge construct (technological)

Init.: +7 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision, sense through (vision [foliage, gas, and smoke only]) 60 ft. Perception: +26

Defense

HP: 330

EAC: 29 KAC: 31

Fort: +15 Ref: +15 Will: +11

Offense

Speed: 60 ft., fly 20 ft. (Ex, clumsy), limited flight

Melee: None

Ranged: elite x-gen gun +29 (4d12+15 B & P) or heavy stellar cannon +29 (4d12+15 P; critical wound [DC 21]) or IMDS missile launcher +29 (13d8+15 B & F)

Offensive Abilities: autoload

Statistics

Str: +9 Dex: +7 Con:Wis: +5 Int: +1 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +26 (+18 to fly), Engineering +26, Piloting +31

Languages: Common

Gear: elite x-gen gun with 400 heavy rounds, heavy stellar cannon with 800 scattergun shells, IMDS missile launcher with 2 advanced missiles

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or battery (3–8)

Special Abilities

Advanced Movement (Ex) Difficult terrain doesn’t hamper a siege robot’s movement.

Autoload (Ex) A siege robot can reload its weapons as part of the same action used to fire them.

Hardened (Ex) A siege robot takes half damage from explosives and collisions.

Limited Flight (Ex) A siege robot’s thruster-based flight works in a vacuum, but in gravity, it can fly a maximum of 10 feet above the ground.

Nanite Repair (Ex) A siege robot’s nanites heal it, restoring a number of Hit Points per hour equal to its CR. Once per day as a full action, the robot can regain 10d8 Hit Points.

Description

Robots serve a variety of functions. They’re often employed in situations where the risks to living beings are too great or emotional responses are a hindrance—notably murder and war.

Assassin robots are killing machines useful for stealthy slayings or gruesome public displays. A user can program targets into the robot, dispatch the unit, and rest assured. The robot relentlessly pursues its quarry, fearing nothing and using microfiber setae on its hands and feet to traverse vertical and horizontal surfaces with ease. Whether it succeeds, fails, escapes, or suffers destruction, the robot leaves little evidence behind—an assassin robot that is captured or destroyed automatically purges its memory and burns out its sensitive hardware components, making tracing the robot’s mission and origin extremely difficult.

Typical assassin robots are 6 feet tall, weigh 300 pounds, and use the weapons detailed in the stat block on page 108, but they can be outfitted with other armaments as a mission requires. In particular, assassin robots on missions where more subtlety is called for use needler pistols stocked with poisoned darts.

There is nothing subtle, however, about a siege robot. These machines serve as artificially intelligent assault vehicles, and many rightly fear these engines of war. Merciless and efficient, a siege robot is as effective at unloading massive damage against a single target as it is at mowing down enemy troops en masse, and its vehicle form makes it difficult to escape from on an open battlefield. Most siege robots are outfitted with large reserves of ammunition, enough to sustain a constant barrage for minutes at a time.

A siege robot can be used as a vehicle in vehicle combat or vehicle chases. In such cases it acts as its own pilot and has the following additional statistics: item level equal to its CR; drive speed 60 ft., full speed 500 ft., overland speed 60 mph, (hover); hardness 8; collision damage 16d10 B (DC 19); –3 attack roll penalty (–6 at full speed). A siege robot acting as a vehicle can carry up to 4 Medium passengers but provides them no cover.

Small Herd Animal

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 135

N Small animal

Init.: +2 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +3

Defense

HP: 6

EAC: 10 KAC: 12

Fort: +2 Ref: +3 Will: +1

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: natural weapon +2 (1d4 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: -2 Dex: +2 Con: +0 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Acrobatics +3

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or herd (4–40)

Description

From the ruthigs of Castrovel to the wollipeds of Triaxus, herd animals are beasts that gather in social groups comprised entirely of creatures of the same species. Herding behavior allows animals to gather and move together for protection from predators. Most commonly, herd animals are herbivores or docile omnivores.

better represent fiercer animals, including aggressive herbivores and omnivores that may or may not move in groups of their own kind.

In the Pact Worlds, the most common herd animals are domesticated. When various species took to exploring and colonizing the stars, they brought their livestock with them. For instance, cattle, goats, and sheep can be found on Absalom Station, as well as on any world where humans have a significant presence. Herd animals in the Pact Worlds serve a variety of purposes in the various societies that cultivate and support them. Farmers and engineers commonly maintain groups of herd animals to harvest their meat, though keeping herd animals for their shorn fur to create textiles is a more sustainable practice. Other cultivators leverage herd animals as mounts or pack animals, and training these docile creatures can result in large profits for professionals who are particularly skilled in this pursuit.

More rarely, some xenobiologists even cultivate groups of herd animals for scientists and corporations who wish to stabilize wild planets’ ecosystems. In this case, interested parties might place large numbers of pack animals in foreign locales to help tame rampant vegetation growth or provide prey for a dying species of predator. The goal of such projects is almost always to improve a planet’s suitability for colonization, mining, or farming. However, this practice is often controversial among ethnobiologists, who argue that introducing large populations of non-native species in this manner produces harmful and unforeseen results more often than it aids environments.

The herd animals in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique herd animal, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, from antlers to hooves, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts (see page 138). Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

The ruthig is a mammal with six legs, padded feet with toenails, a long and thin neck, an extended jaw with flat teeth, a lengthy and rough tongue, and two pairs of eyes. Its shaggy fur is home to a plethora of algae and moss species, giving the ruthig a mottled green color useful as camouflage in the herbivore’s native woodlands. Wild ruthigs travel in grazing herds, which are less camouflaged during the birthing season when gray-furred young are born. People of Castrovel domesticate the beasts for their honey-sweet milk and succulent meat.

A ruthig is a Medium herd animal that is about 4 feet tall at the withers and 6 feet tall with its head raised high. On average, a ruthig weighs about 250 pounds. A ruthig can use its bludgeoning kick as a natural weapon, and it has camouflage when in forested terrain.

Small Predator

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 135

N Small animal

Init.: +2 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +3

Defense

HP: 6

EAC: 10 KAC: 12

Fort: +0 Ref: +2 Will: +1

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: natural weapon +3 (1d4 P or S)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: -2 Dex: +2 Con: +0 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: -2

Skills: Acrobatics +3, Athletics +3, Stealth +3

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or pack (3-21)

Description

From the vortex sharks of Kalo-Mahoi to the hoarbats of Verces’s Darkside, and from the dire tigers of Castrovel to the tremor worms of Akiton, predators abound in the Pact Worlds and on planets across the galaxy. What unites these disparate species is that their diets include the meat of other creatures and that they hunt and kill to acquire this food. On planets where sapient species are dominant, predators have learned that weapon-wielding creatures can be deadly prey. Other predators, deprived of such contact, often see sentient explorers as an unfamiliar form of potential sustenance, making confrontations inevitable.

Predators come in all shapes and sizes, limited only by the environment where they are found. Bigger predators rely on abundant food, cycles of inactivity, an omnivorous diet, or a combination of these. Smaller predators have fewer requirements and can be equally dangerous; even very small animals can evolve pack tactics to overwhelm larger and stronger creatures. Some of these swarms, such as the flying viper eels of Bretheda, strip flesh from bone as they move over and around prey.

The predators in this entry serve a couple of purposes. Employ them as written when you need statistics for this sort of creature. To create a unique predator, use the stat blocks here and your concept as starting points. Decide what type of natural weapon the animal has, from claws to slams, altering the damage type to suit the weapon. Then add elements from Appendix 2: Environmental Grafts. Tailor anything you want to fit your concept.

The vortex shark is a slim, cartilaginous fish that lives in the depths of Kalo-Mahoi’s oceans. The creature is bioluminescent and has a four-part jaw with rows of hooked teeth. A vortex shark’s natural weapon is a bite that deals slashing damage, has the bleed 1d6 critical hit effect, and allows the shark’s teeth to grab ahold of a target. The female of the species grows larger than the male and lays eggs in pouches she leaves behind. Young fend for themselves when they hatch, catching weaker siblings for a first meal. An adult vortex shark is a Large aquatic predator, averaging 12 feet in length and 1,000 pounds in weight. The sharks can breathe only water and have a land speed of 0 feet and a swim speed of 60 feet. Living in Kalo-Mahoi’s seas has inured them to cold (resistance 5 to cold), and they have blindsense (scent) out to 30 feet and the tracking (scent) special ability for waterborne prey, which they use mostly to hunt bleeding creatures.

Squox

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 135

N Tiny animal

Init.: +3 Senses: blindsense (scent) 30 ft., low-light vision Perception: +3

Defense

HP: 6

EAC: 11 KAC: 11

Fort: +1 Ref: +4 Will: +0

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: bite +3 (1d4 P)

Offensive Abilities: squox tricks

Statistics

Str: -3 Dex: +3 Con: +0 Wis: +0 Int: -4 Cha: +1

Skills: Acrobatics +7 (+11 to balance, escape, or tumble), Athletics +3 (+11 to climb), Stealth +7

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or skulk (3–8)

Special Abilities

Squox Tricks (Ex)

Description

Called vulkariki in Lashunta, squoxes gained their popular moniker from humans who thought the creatures resembled a cross between a fox and a squirrel, with useful qualities from both animals. Squoxes are furry, vulpine animals roughly 2 feet in length and weighing around 15 pounds. They are quadrupedal, with five-fingered prehensile paws that have rotating wrists and ankles, allowing them to climb down surfaces headfirst like a squirrel. The creature’s other features are fox-like, including a flattened head with triangular ears, a pointed snout, and a bushy tail. Squox fur can come in hues of red orange, gray, fulvous, white, or brown, with white on the belly, neck, and tail tip. The species also has an array of fur patterns and environmental adaptations, such as long ears that allow desert-dwelling squoxes to disperse heat and thick seasonal fur and coloration for those accustomed to arctic regions.

Squoxes are among the most intelligent animal species in the Pact Worlds, exhibiting social behaviors and hierarchies along with a vast vocal repertoire. When confronted, squoxes are devious tacticians, especially in groups. They are clever enough to poke eyes, bite sensitive regions, and steal objects to bait enemies away from a den.

Although they originated on Castrovel, squoxes gained popularity across the Pact Worlds for their adorable features and ability to adapt to new environments. The people of Asana happily exported squoxes, which lashuntas see as pests. Over centuries, squoxes spread and successfully adjusted to biomes across the Pact Worlds. They’ve even begun to appear in the wild in the Veskarium and worlds in the Vast.

Xenowardens have tried to preserve the native squoxes of Castrovel while simultaneously curbing the incursion of the species into other ecologies. The group fears the invasive critters might irrevocably damage invaded ecosystems if left unchecked. Therefore, Xenowardens actively promote squox hunting on numerous worlds, as well as legal controls against importing the animals and releasing them into the wild.

Squoxes are abundant across the Pact Worlds, breeding quickly and living for up to 10 years, or double that in captivity. Their intelligence and delightful appearance make them desirable companion animals, and they’re intelligent enough to be easily trained. Squoxes are also loyal, protective, charming, and entertaining, making them great companions for children. As clever and fun as they are, squoxes are also notorious for mischief, such as figuring out how to open cabinets and work simple machinery with the same aptitude as a very young sapient. They’ve even been known to clean up after themselves to hide thefts or accidents from their owners. Nevertheless, squoxes make great pets.

A squox kit can be purchased for 100 credits at 1 month old, just weaned from its mother. Untrained squoxes born as pets are usually domesticated and friendly but likely to misbehave without training. However, unscrupulous dealers gather squox kits in the wild and pass them off as domesticated, selling them at bargain prices. Squoxes reach adulthood by 10 months, and a fully trained adult squox goes for 400 credits.

A squox kit can be reared, or an older squox domesticated and trained, using the Survival skill, which takes 3 months. The squox’s inherent cleverness, curiosity, and friendliness grant its trainer a +2 circumstance bonus to Survival checks to rear or train it. A domesticated squox is friendly or helpful toward its trainer and any owner who treats it well.

, known colloquially as a squox pocket, is available to PCs who want to protect their pets. Shirrens use similar devices to carry and protect their young, although they call the device a larva tube.

is for PCs who have a trained squox pet.

Swarm Mindreaper

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

CE Medium monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +4 Senses: blindsense (vibration) 30 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +19

Defense

HP: 90

EAC: 18 KAC: 19

Fort: +6 Ref: +8 Will: +12

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: arm spike +14 (1d8+8 P; critical staggered [DC 17])

Offensive Abilities: trepan

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +4 Con: +2 Wis: +5 Int: +1 Cha: -1

Skills: Athletics +14 (+22 to climb), Mysticism +19, Stealth +14

Languages: Shirren; telepathy 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or pack (1–2 plus 3–6 Swarm corrovoxes)

Special Abilities

Arm Spike (Ex) A spike projects from one of the mindreaper’s hands. The mindreaper cannot wield a weapon with this hand, and it can’t be disarmed of this spike.

Swarm Mind (Ex) Members of the Swarm are bound together into a singular hive mind by a blend of exuded pheromones, imperceptible movements of antennae and limbs, electrostatic fields, and telepathic communication. All Swarm creatures with 30 feet of each other are in constant communication; if one is aware of a threat, all are. (Such awareness can spread along a “chain” of Swarm creatures under appropriate circumstances, potentially alerting distant Swarm creatures). In addition, once per round when within 30 feet of another Swarm creature, a Swarm creature can roll twice and take the better result on a saving throw against a mind-affecting effect.

Trepan (Ex) As a full action, a mindreaper can use its arm spike to pierce the skull of a helpless creature. The mindreaper makes one attack with its arm spike, scoring a critical hit if the attack succeeds. If this attack kills the target, the mindreaper siphons out a portion of the target’s brain along with an impression of the creature’s memories. A mindreaper can also use this ability to extract brain matter and memories from the remains of a creature killed within the last hour. This ability can be used only against living or recently killed creatures with a brain or close biological equivalent.

Trepan Analysis (Su) A mindreaper that has extracted brain matter with its trepan ability can analyze the memories stored within. Doing so functions as speak with dead, except the mindreaper has an hour after extracting the memories to ask the six questions, which need not be asked all at one time. Asking a question takes a full action. Only one mindreaper can extract memories from a given creature. A mindreaper can retain only one set of memories at a time; if it uses its trepan ability on another creature, any previously stored brain matter is lost.

Description

Originally an insectile race called the kucharn, the Swarm is now a single-minded collective with a desire to consume all things and absorb their best qualities into itself. The Swarm moves from planet to planet in tremendous organic hive-ships, reducing each so-called “feeder world” to a barren husk incapable of supporting life, and occasionally altering its own DNA in the process to take on qualities from that world’s species. Once it has consumed everything of use on a planet, the Swarm moves on, not bothering to hold territory.

Ironically, one of the most violent races in the galaxy also birthed one of the most peaceful, as a mutation within a sub-hive gave life to the shirrens, who broke away to form a new species. The Swarm is notorious not just because of the invasion that finally ended hostilities between the Pact Worlds and the Veskarium, but also thanks to the warnings of shirrens, who understand the Swarm’s might and its hunger as no other race can.

While individual components of the Swarm have some form of intelligence—or at least a set of complex programmed behaviors that resembles intellect—they cannot generally be reasoned with in any fashion. Swarm components rarely communicate with other creatures, as they see every alien entity as either a food source or a threat. The Swarm’s morale is unbreakable, and while individual components might retreat for tactical reasons, fear is utterly unknown to the Swarm and its components.

The Swarm rarely wields manufactured weapons, instead integrating biotechnology grown or grafted onto component creatures. Because of its constant genetic upgrading and experimentation, the Swarm encompasses components with a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and capabilities, from the mighty dreadlancers to the microscopic, bloodstream-infesting toxicytes.

Tashtari Alpha

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

N Medium magical (beast)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +14

Defense

HP: 105

EAC: 19 KAC: 21

Fort: +11 Ref: +11 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., climb 30 ft.

Melee: bite +15 (2d6+11 P)

Ranged: muzzle beam +18 (2d6+7 F; critical burn 1d6)

Offensive Abilities: bristle nova

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +5 Con: +2 Wis: +1 Int: +1 Cha: -1

Skills: Acrobatics +14, Athletics +14 (+22 to climb), Stealth +19

Ecology

Environment: any forests or marshes (Castrovel)

Organization: pack (2 plus 3–8 tashtaris)

Special Abilities

Bristle Nova (Ex) Once per day as a standard action, a tashtari alpha can cause its filaments to flare with intense light. Each creature within 60 feet must succeed at a DC 15 Fortitude save or be blinded for 1d4 rounds. Creatures that succeed at this save are instead dazzled for 1 round. This ability has no effect on sightless creatures. Tashtaris and tashtari alphas are immune to the effects of this ability.

Muzzle Beam (Ex)

Description

The first glimpse most observers have of a tashtari pack is a far-off twinkling of lights, which is easily mistaken for swamp gas or the glint of moonlight. Produced by the coat of supple filaments that cover a tashtari’s body, these phosphorescent lights facilitate communication, allowing tashtari packs to silently coordinate while searching for prey and setting up ambushes. Tashtaris also use this luminescence for social interactions. Tashtaris evolved their tactics and laser attacks to hunt the small, quick-moving mammals of their native habitat on Castrovel, but these predators are not shy about taking down larger prey if circumstances are in their favor.

A pack of tashtaris consists of a dominant mating pair, their offspring, and close relatives. Juvenile tashtaris leave the pack soon after reaching maturity to seek mates from unrelated groups and found new packs.

Tashtaris are nocturnal. During the day, they use the flexible claws on their trio of multijointed legs to scramble to the sunlit tops of tall trees in their habitat. They spend much of the day basking, with their photoreceptive filaments raised to maximize sunlight absorption. This basking behavior, more common in cold-blooded creatures, offsets the tremendous caloric demands of the tashtari’s muzzle laser. Instead of using bioluminescence, the tashtari stores solar energy gathered by its filaments in a photoenergetic node at its throat. When attacking, the tashtari uses a flexible focusing membrane to concentrate energy into a coherent, deadly beam.

Sentient species of Castrovel refer to these beasts as tashtaris, but offworlders have nicknamed the creatures “laser wolves,” based on their hunting behavior and unique physiology. Attempts to domesticate tashtaris have spread the creatures to far-flung parts of the galaxy, but trainers must closely monitor the creatures’ intake of solar radiation. Tashtaris transplanted to systems with stronger solar output can become dangerously aggressive.

Hunters can do brisk business harvesting the filaments, photoenergetic nodes, and focusing membranes of tashtaris and selling them to bioengineers. If not for conservation efforts on Castrovel, tashtaris could have been hunted to extinction, since their photosensitive adaptations are difficult and expensive to duplicate through synthetic means. Cessation of hostilities between the formians and lashuntas has allowed a recent surge in the regulated trade of biotech that incorporates tashtari tissue. Explorers and scouts equip themselves with

or

, and many people throughout the Pact Worlds use

for practical and cosmetic purposes.

Tashtari

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 3 XP: 800

N Medium magical (beast)

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +8

Defense

HP: 40

EAC: 14 KAC: 16

Fort: +7 Ref: +7 Will: +2

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., climb 30 ft.

Melee: bite +9 (1d6+5 P)

Ranged: muzzle beam +12 (1d4+3 F; critical burn 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: bristle flash

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +4 Con: +1 Wis: +1 Int: +0 Cha: -1

Skills: Acrobatics +8, Athletics +8 (+16 to climb), Stealth +13

Ecology

Environment: any forests or marshes (Castrovel)

Organization: pack (3–8)

Special Abilities

Bristle Flash (Ex) Once per day as a standard action, a tashtari can cause its filaments to glow with intense light. Each creature within 60 feet must succeed at a DC 12 Fortitude save or be dazzled for 1d4 rounds. This ability has no effect on sightless creatures. Tashtaris and tashtari alphas are immune to the effects of this ability.

Muzzle Beam (Ex)

Description

The first glimpse most observers have of a tashtari pack is a far-off twinkling of lights, which is easily mistaken for swamp gas or the glint of moonlight. Produced by the coat of supple filaments that cover a tashtari’s body, these phosphorescent lights facilitate communication, allowing tashtari packs to silently coordinate while searching for prey and setting up ambushes. Tashtaris also use this luminescence for social interactions. Tashtaris evolved their tactics and laser attacks to hunt the small, quick-moving mammals of their native habitat on Castrovel, but these predators are not shy about taking down larger prey if circumstances are in their favor.

A pack of tashtaris consists of a dominant mating pair, their offspring, and close relatives. Juvenile tashtaris leave the pack soon after reaching maturity to seek mates from unrelated groups and found new packs.

Tashtaris are nocturnal. During the day, they use the flexible claws on their trio of multijointed legs to scramble to the sunlit tops of tall trees in their habitat. They spend much of the day basking, with their photoreceptive filaments raised to maximize sunlight absorption. This basking behavior, more common in cold-blooded creatures, offsets the tremendous caloric demands of the tashtari’s muzzle laser. Instead of using bioluminescence, the tashtari stores solar energy gathered by its filaments in a photoenergetic node at its throat. When attacking, the tashtari uses a flexible focusing membrane to concentrate energy into a coherent, deadly beam.

Sentient species of Castrovel refer to these beasts as tashtaris, but offworlders have nicknamed the creatures “laser wolves,” based on their hunting behavior and unique physiology. Attempts to domesticate tashtaris have spread the creatures to far-flung parts of the galaxy, but trainers must closely monitor the creatures’ intake of solar radiation. Tashtaris transplanted to systems with stronger solar output can become dangerously aggressive.

Hunters can do brisk business harvesting the filaments, photoenergetic nodes, and focusing membranes of tashtaris and selling them to bioengineers. If not for conservation efforts on Castrovel, tashtaris could have been hunted to extinction, since their photosensitive adaptations are difficult and expensive to duplicate through synthetic means. Cessation of hostilities between the formians and lashuntas has allowed a recent surge in the regulated trade of biotech that incorporates tashtari tissue. Explorers and scouts equip themselves with

or

, and many people throughout the Pact Worlds use

for practical and cosmetic purposes.

Tekhoinos

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 10 XP: 9,600

N Medium outsider (aeon)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +19

Defense

HP: 145

EAC: 23 KAC: 24

Fort: +11 Ref: +9 Will: +13

Offense

Speed: 20 ft., fly 40 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: slam +19 (2d8+12 B)

Ranged: telekinetic blast +21 (2d8+10 B; critical knockdown)

Offensive Abilities: pattern bind

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +5 Con: +2 Wis: +8 Int: +2 Cha: +3

Skills: Acrobatics +19 (+27 to fly), Culture +19 (+29 to recall knowledge), Engineering +19, Life Science +19 (+29 to recall knowledge), Mysticism +24 (+34 to recall knowledge), Sense Motive +19, Stealth +24

Languages: envisaging

Ecology

Environment: any (Outer Planes)

Organization: solitary, pair, or collective (3–10)

Special Abilities

Adaptive Defense (Ex) When a tekhoinos takes acid, electricity, fire, or sonic damage, it gains resistance 10 to that damage type. This resistance does not apply to the triggering attack, and it lasts for 1 hour or until the tekhoinos takes damage of another of those types, triggering a new resistance. This resistance stacks with other sources of energy resistance.

Pattern Bind (Su) As a standard action, a tekhoinos can force a creature within 100 feet to repeat its actions unless it succeeds at a DC 19 Will saving throw. Whatever full, standard, or move actions the creature takes on its turn after being subjected to this effect, the target must repeat on the following turn. The creature must take the same actions in the same order (for example, moving its speed and casting a specific spell) and must act against the same target or targets. However, the creature doesn’t have to make exactly the same choices (such as moving the same number of squares or choosing the same command for the command spell). If the target is unable to repeat an action, it is unable to act and its turn ends immediately. A creature that is affected by pattern bind can’t delay, and if it readies an action on the first turn it is affected, it must ready the same action on its following turn using the same trigger. Whether or not a creature succeeds at its saving throw against this ability, it is immune to further instances of this effect for 24 hours.

Telekinetic Blast (Ex) A tekhoinos’s telekinetic blast has a range increment of 50 feet.

Description

Tiefling

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 2 XP: 600

LE Medium outsider (native)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +8

Defense

HP: 23

EAC: 13 KAC: 14

Fort: +0 Ref: +5 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: tactical baton +8 (1d4+1 B)

Ranged: tactical semi-auto pistol +8 (1d6 P) or tactical shirren-eye rifle +8 (1d10 P)

Offensive Abilities: fiendish gloom, trick attack +1d4

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +4 Con: +0 Wis: +0 Int: +2 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +13, Athletics +8, Bluff +13, Sleight of Hand +8, Stealth +8 (+12 with trick attack)

Languages: Akitonian, Common, Eoxian, Infernal

Gear: second skin (jump jets), tactical semi-auto pistol with 45 small arm rounds, tactical baton, tactical shirren-eye rifle with 25 sniper rounds

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or gang (3–6)

Special Abilities

Fiendish Gloom (Su) As a standard action, the tiefling causes light within 20 feet of her to decrease one step. This gloom lasts for up to 1 minute, but the tiefling can dismiss it as a swift action. Nonmagical light sources can’t increase the light level in this area. Magical light can increase the light level in this area only if it’s from an item or creature of a level or CR higher than that of the tiefling. A tiefling can use this ability once per day, plus a number of times equal to half her CR or level.

Description

Many kinds of extraplanar beings can infuse humanoids’ bloodlines, whether as a side effect of powerful magic or the result of a tryst; those in whom extraplanar traits surface strongly are known as planar scions. Aasimars and tieflings, the mortal offspring of celestials and fiends, respectively, are the most common of these. Though planar scions resemble their humanoid kin, their appearance and demeanor bear supernatural touches. Tieflings might have horns, vestigial wings, or cloven hooves, while aasimars may have glowing eyes or a metallic sheen to their hair and skin.

Because of their innate curiosity, humans are more likely to dally with outsiders, and as a consequence, a significant percentage of planar scions living in the Pact Worlds are descended from humans. However, because humans are far less populous than in pre-Gap eras, planar scions descended from other humanoid races are now far more numerous. A planar scion might pass for a member of the humanoid parent’s species, or the scion’s otherworldly features could make their origin obvious to those who are familiar with the species’ normal characteristics. Those whose outsider blood is evident still find acceptance in most major settlements across the Pact Worlds, where diverse beings coexist in peace. On Absalom Station, the hub of interspecies relations, few people bat an eye when they meet an aasimar or tiefling.

However, in insular or tradition-bound communities, any signs of plane-touched heritage can be a blessing—or a death sentence—depending on the dominant traditions. The demon-worshiping drow of Apostae see tieflings as a favor from demonic patrons, while the elves of Sovyrian on Castrovel are likely to banish children who bear such fiendish heritage. The Radiant Cathedral, on the other hand, trains aasimars to become beacons of the Sarenite faith, and also guides tieflings to a brighter future than their heritage suggests. Formians, shobhads, vesk, and other species with flexible morality view aasimars and tieflings, particularly those descended from their own kind, with both admiration and suspicion.

Planar scions are often outliers in their community, either put on a pedestal or ostracized because of their ancestry. The potent blood that courses through the veins of aasimars and tieflings also makes them ambitious; many choose a dangerous but rewarding profession, such as explorer, mercenary, spy, or pilot.

Trained Squox

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 400

N Tiny animal

Init.: +4 Senses: blindsense (scent) 30 ft., low-light vision Perception: +5

Defense

HP: 20

EAC: 12 KAC: 12

Fort: +3 Ref: +6 Will: +1

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: bite +7 (1d4+1 P)

Offensive Abilities: squox tricks

Statistics

Str: -2 Dex: +4 Con: +2 Wis: +0 Int: -4 Cha: +1

Skills: Acrobatics +10 (+14 to balance, escape, or tumble), Athletics +5 (+13 to climb), Stealth +10

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or team (3–6)

Special Abilities

Squox Tricks (Ex)

Description

Called vulkariki in Lashunta, squoxes gained their popular moniker from humans who thought the creatures resembled a cross between a fox and a squirrel, with useful qualities from both animals. Squoxes are furry, vulpine animals roughly 2 feet in length and weighing around 15 pounds. They are quadrupedal, with five-fingered prehensile paws that have rotating wrists and ankles, allowing them to climb down surfaces headfirst like a squirrel. The creature’s other features are fox-like, including a flattened head with triangular ears, a pointed snout, and a bushy tail. Squox fur can come in hues of red orange, gray, fulvous, white, or brown, with white on the belly, neck, and tail tip. The species also has an array of fur patterns and environmental adaptations, such as long ears that allow desert-dwelling squoxes to disperse heat and thick seasonal fur and coloration for those accustomed to arctic regions.

Squoxes are among the most intelligent animal species in the Pact Worlds, exhibiting social behaviors and hierarchies along with a vast vocal repertoire. When confronted, squoxes are devious tacticians, especially in groups. They are clever enough to poke eyes, bite sensitive regions, and steal objects to bait enemies away from a den.

Although they originated on Castrovel, squoxes gained popularity across the Pact Worlds for their adorable features and ability to adapt to new environments. The people of Asana happily exported squoxes, which lashuntas see as pests. Over centuries, squoxes spread and successfully adjusted to biomes across the Pact Worlds. They’ve even begun to appear in the wild in the Veskarium and worlds in the Vast.

Xenowardens have tried to preserve the native squoxes of Castrovel while simultaneously curbing the incursion of the species into other ecologies. The group fears the invasive critters might irrevocably damage invaded ecosystems if left unchecked. Therefore, Xenowardens actively promote squox hunting on numerous worlds, as well as legal controls against importing the animals and releasing them into the wild.

Squoxes are abundant across the Pact Worlds, breeding quickly and living for up to 10 years, or double that in captivity. Their intelligence and delightful appearance make them desirable companion animals, and they’re intelligent enough to be easily trained. Squoxes are also loyal, protective, charming, and entertaining, making them great companions for children. As clever and fun as they are, squoxes are also notorious for mischief, such as figuring out how to open cabinets and work simple machinery with the same aptitude as a very young sapient. They’ve even been known to clean up after themselves to hide thefts or accidents from their owners. Nevertheless, squoxes make great pets.

A squox kit can be purchased for 100 credits at 1 month old, just weaned from its mother. Untrained squoxes born as pets are usually domesticated and friendly but likely to misbehave without training. However, unscrupulous dealers gather squox kits in the wild and pass them off as domesticated, selling them at bargain prices. Squoxes reach adulthood by 10 months, and a fully trained adult squox goes for 400 credits.

A squox kit can be reared, or an older squox domesticated and trained, using the Survival skill, which takes 3 months. The squox’s inherent cleverness, curiosity, and friendliness grant its trainer a +2 circumstance bonus to Survival checks to rear or train it. A domesticated squox is friendly or helpful toward its trainer and any owner who treats it well.

, known colloquially as a squox pocket, is available to PCs who want to protect their pets. Shirrens use similar devices to carry and protect their young, although they call the device a larva tube.

is for PCs who have a trained squox pet.

Azata, Tritidair

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

CG Small outsider (azata)

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +21

Defense

HP: 105

EAC: 20 KAC: 19

Fort: +7 Ref: +9 Will: +11

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 60 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: holy tritidair sintered starknife +16 (4d4+4 E & P; critical blind [DC 18, 1d3 rounds])

Ranged: light ray +16 (1d10+8 E & F; critical blind [DC 18, 1d3 rounds])

Offensive Abilities: starlight gaze (60 ft., DC 18)

Spell-like Abilties: (CL 8th) 1/day—irradiate (DC 20), remove affliction 3/day—charm person (DC 18), lesser restoration, mystic cure (2nd level) At will—dancing lights, life bubble

Statistics

Str: -1 Dex: +4 Con: +0 Wis: +2 Int: +1 Cha: +6

Skills: Acrobatics +21 (+29 to fly), Mysticism +16, Physical Science +16

Languages: Celestial, Common; truespeech

Gear: holy tritidair sintered starknife

Ecology

Environment: any (Elysium)

Organization: solitary, pair, or flight (3–8)

Special Abilities

Brighten (Su) As a move action, a tritidair can shed bright light in a 20-foot radius, normal light for an additional 20 feet, and dim light for another 20 feet. The tritidair can shut this light off as a move action, and the light goes out if the azata falls unconscious or dies.

Light Ray (Su) A tritidair’s light ray has a range increment of 90 feet. This attack’s damage is good-aligned, so it ignores the energy resistance of evil dragons, evil outsiders, and evil undead.

Starlight Form (Su) By focusing and using every action to move for 1 minute, a tritidair can shift its form to starlight—a massless state of pure energy in which the azata can only move and can’t be harmed. While in this form, a tritidair moves at standard navigation and astrogation rates, like a starship, and it uses Mysticism in place of Piloting to astrogate. A tritidair in this form can pass through material objects, provided it begins and ends its turn outside such an object. In addition, a tritidair can enter a star or gas giant and exit another star or gas giant with no restriction on the distance between those bodies. This travel is instantaneous if the tritidair employs it to move within the same system. Otherwise, this travel takes an amount of time equal to Drift travel for the same distance as if the tritidair had a Drift engine rating of 5. A tritidair in starlight form can assume its normal form as a move action, and it resumes its normal form if it somehow falls unconscious or dies.

Starlight Gaze (Su) A tritidair’s eyes sparkle with hypnotic starlight. Tritidairs wear special goggles to subdue this gaze, but a tritidair can remove these goggles as a swift action. A creature that fails its save against the gaze is fascinated for 1 round. If a creature succeeds at two saving throws against this effect, the same tritidair’s gaze can’t affect that creature for 24 hours. Azatas are immune to this gaze. This is a mind-affecting effect.

Description

Flitting among the stars and zipping between worlds, tritidairs resemble violet- skinned children with antennae and dark- purple butterfly wings dotted with pinpoints of glowing light. These outsiders are constantly cheerful, frequently playing pranks and making jokes, but their good humor belies a great deal of power. Tritidairs have a deep connection to the nuclear fusion that powers stars, giving them their star-related abilities. Their eyes twinkle with starlight that can fascinate some viewers, so they keep their eyes covered with stylish goggles to prevent accidental exposure. Travelers in starships occasionally spot the unmistakable purple streak of light as a tritidair flies past.

Tritidairs are devoted servants of Desna and frequently travel to Cynosure, the pole star and home of Desna’s palace. Desnan priests say that the goddess planted a seed in a new star, which shot forth light that became the first tritidair. Although this origin story might be apocryphal, what is certain is that the birth of every new star creates a tritidair. They don’t remain near their stars of origin for long, but each tritidair has a unique pattern of glowing dots on their butterfly wings corresponding to the locations of the stars where and when they were born.

These outsiders serve as messengers and pages for the Song of the Spheres, running errands for her throughout the galaxy. Although their starlight form enables interplanar travel, this method of travel has its limits. Tritidairs explain that not every star can provide passage—some are broken—but the concept is difficult to describe to others. Still, tritidairs can move quickly over vast distances to convey messages or provide aid to followers and allies of Desna who find themselves in trouble.

Tritidairs are fiercely loyal. The kindhearted and impulsive creatures don’t seek out combat, nor does Desna commonly send them on missions involving violence. If pushed into combat, particularly if required to protect innocents, they are very willing to use spells and weapons to deal deadly damage. All tritidairs carry easily identifiable starknives patterned with constellations matching those on their wings. These magical starknives charge with energy each time the tritidair travels between stars. Many Desnans carry copies of these knives. Some who have interacted with a tritidair engrave such starknives with constellation patterns matching the wings of that tritidair as a way to honor and remember the azata, much like carving a dear friend’s name on a personal treasure.

These azatas lack sexual characteristics, but some tritidairs choose a gender, and many favor the feminine, mimicking their goddess. They enjoy art, music, and theater, and it’s not uncommon for a major performance to have a tritidair or two in attendance. When tritidairs meet in larger groups, they often enjoy playing games and sports. However, tritidairs don’t have permanent residences or family units, and they don’t stay in one place for long.

Tritidairs sometimes linger on Cynosure or in Elysium, but most prefer to remain on the Material Plane. They genuinely enjoy the company of mortals, and when not on assignments from Desna, tritidairs travel, alone or in small groups, to random planets or starships, where the azatas look for new friends and adventures. Because of this tritidair spirit of exploration, many species on various worlds have myths and stories of flying star children.

Although tritidairs spread the worship of Desna, their primary motivations are to meet new creatures and have fun experiences. They aren’t the most reliable when called upon by anyone but Desna, but nevertheless, some creatures and organizations successfully form alliances with tritidairs. Solarians and tritidairs can feel a connection to one another, given their mutual association with the stars.

Tritidairs don’t age, and some have outlived the birth and death of stars. A tritidair can survive the destruction of its star of origin, and similarly the demise of a tritidair has no discernible effect on the star. Tritidairs also don’t require sleep, but they engage in long meditations to dream. Not only do they find the experience amusing, but Desna can also speak with them through their dreams, sending the tritidairs their missions.

Other creatures sleeping or engaging in similar deep rest near a meditating tritidair can find their dreams invaded by vivid visions from the azatas. Many who have such experiences report that their dreams never go back to normal, remaining rich and dramatic, but seldom troubling. Worshipers of Desna sometimes seek out tritidairs, hoping to earn this experience.

Such seekers also hope to have visions of Desna, such as those who have been blessed with tritidair-influenced dreams have claimed to receive. These assertions can be true—Desna can use the neural pathways a tritidair’s influence opens to communicate with other beings likely to aid the goddess’s aims. Good-hearted dreamers find themselves becoming more spontaneous and venturesome, looking for opportunities to explore and help others. With this increase in boldness comes an increase in apparent luck, although what seems to be luck is just as likely to be an increased awareness of good opportunities and the willingness to seize them.

Trox Defensor

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 9 XP: 6,400

LG Large monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +17

Defense

HP: 145 RP: 4

EAC: 22 KAC: 24

Fort: +13 Ref: +12 Will: +10

Offense

Speed: 50 ft., burrow 20 ft.

Melee: advanced swoop hammer +22 (3d10+18 B; critical knockdown)

Ranged: advanced arc emitter +19 (2d4+9 E) or stickybomb grenade III +19 (explode [20 ft., entangled 2d4 rounds, DC 16])

Offensive Abilities: frenzy, grappler

Statistics

Str: +6 Dex: +0 Con: +4 Wis: +3 Int: +1 Cha: +1

Skills: Athletics +22, Intimidate +17, Mysticism +17

Languages: Common, Nchaki

Gear: advanced iridishell, advanced swoop hammer, advanced arc emitter with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each), stickybomb grenades III (2)

Ecology

Environment: any (Nchak)

Organization: solitary, band (2–8), or clan (9–20)

Special Abilities

Bulwark (Ex) When a trox fights defensively or takes the total defense action, he can grant half the bonus to AC granted by that action to an adjacent ally.

Frenzy (Ex) Once per day when a significant enemy causes an ally to take Hit Point damage, a trox can fly into a frenzy, gaining a +2 racial bonus to melee attack rolls and a –2 penalty to AC for 1 minute.

Grappler (Ex) Trox gain a +2 racial bonus to grapple combat maneuvers.

Vesitigal Arms (Ex) A trox’s four vestigial arms can be used to hold, draw, or put away items of negligible bulk, but not to make attacks, wield weapons, or use items.

Description

Trox are massive, sturdy creatures native to the Liavaran moon of Nchak. They have chitinous armor and a fearsome, mandibled countenance that belies their gentle spirits.

Three distinct, related creatures have been called trox. The original trox were eight-legged arthropods until a time long before the Gap when Nchak’s spiritual leader, believed to be a mortal incarnation of Hylax, ordered their magical transformation into their current humanoid form. Spellcasters made four of the trox’s eight legs into powerful limbs, shaped mandibles into scythes, and transformed chitin into layered armor plates that can flare in an intimidating display.

Many of these humanoid trox were then encased in shielded asteroids in Liavara’s rings and ejected from orbit at magically enhanced speeds in myriad directions. The asteroids landed on several worlds in their home system. Duergar enslaved the trox that landed on lost Golarion and twisted them into murderous beasts. These further-altered trox disappeared when Golarion did, but their story is well known to Nchak’s trox, making them even more vehement opponents of slavery.

Although they were created as emissaries, trox also make great soldiers. On Nchak, they are protectors of the spiritual center of Hylax worship, and they greet all peaceful visitors with humility and grace. The influence the philosopher worms of Nchak hold over the trox is mysterious. Trox speak of these worms only to say that they serve the beneficent aims of the Forever Queen.

Trox often serve as spiritual guides and advisors to those curious about Hylax. She is the goddess of diplomacy and peace, as well as protector of the weak, a role for which trox are also well equipped. Trox travel more often to teach and protect others than to seek adventure. Despite their might, they prefer to use their imposing presence to defuse conflict before it starts.

Trox devoted to Hylax wield hammers. To trox, these weapons are ancient symbols of constructive power, and are also useful for vanquishing threats to peace.

Trox

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 2 XP: 600

NG Large monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +0 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +7

Defense

HP: 25

EAC: 13 KAC: 15

Fort: +6 Ref: +5 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., burrow 20 ft.

Melee: assault hammer +11 (1d6+6 B)

Offensive Abilities: frenzy, grappler

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +0 Con: +2 Wis: +1 Int: +0 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +12, Intimidate +7, Mysticism +7

Languages: Common, Nchaki

Gear: assault hammer

Ecology

Environment: any (Nchak)

Organization: solitary, band (2–8), or clan (9–20)

Special Abilities

Bulwark (Ex) When a trox fights defensively or takes the total defense action, he can grant half the bonus to AC granted by that action to an adjacent ally.

Frenzy (Ex) Once per day when a significant enemy causes an ally to take Hit Point damage, a trox can fly into a frenzy, gaining a +2 racial bonus to melee attack rolls and a –2 penalty to AC for 1 minute.

Grappler (Ex) Trox gain a +2 racial bonus to grapple combat maneuvers.

Vesitigal Arms (Ex) A trox’s four vestigial arms can be used to hold, draw, or put away items of negligible bulk, but not to make attacks, wield weapons, or use items.

Description

Trox are massive, sturdy creatures native to the Liavaran moon of Nchak. They have chitinous armor and a fearsome, mandibled countenance that belies their gentle spirits.

Three distinct, related creatures have been called trox. The original trox were eight-legged arthropods until a time long before the Gap when Nchak’s spiritual leader, believed to be a mortal incarnation of Hylax, ordered their magical transformation into their current humanoid form. Spellcasters made four of the trox’s eight legs into powerful limbs, shaped mandibles into scythes, and transformed chitin into layered armor plates that can flare in an intimidating display.

Many of these humanoid trox were then encased in shielded asteroids in Liavara’s rings and ejected from orbit at magically enhanced speeds in myriad directions. The asteroids landed on several worlds in their home system. Duergar enslaved the trox that landed on lost Golarion and twisted them into murderous beasts. These further-altered trox disappeared when Golarion did, but their story is well known to Nchak’s trox, making them even more vehement opponents of slavery.

Although they were created as emissaries, trox also make great soldiers. On Nchak, they are protectors of the spiritual center of Hylax worship, and they greet all peaceful visitors with humility and grace. The influence the philosopher worms of Nchak hold over the trox is mysterious. Trox speak of these worms only to say that they serve the beneficent aims of the Forever Queen.

Trox often serve as spiritual guides and advisors to those curious about Hylax. She is the goddess of diplomacy and peace, as well as protector of the weak, a role for which trox are also well equipped. Trox travel more often to teach and protect others than to seek adventure. Despite their might, they prefer to use their imposing presence to defuse conflict before it starts.

Trox devoted to Hylax wield hammers. To trox, these weapons are ancient symbols of constructive power, and are also useful for vanquishing threats to peace.

Uplifted Bear Avenger

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 4 XP: 1,200

CN Large magical (beast)

Init.: +7 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 56

EAC: 16 KAC: 18

Fort: +8 Ref: +8 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 50 ft., climb 20 ft. (45 ft., climb 15 ft. in armor)

Melee: claw +13 (1d6+9 S) or tactical swoop hammer +13 (1d10+9 B; critical knockdown)

Ranged: frostbite-class zero rifle +10 (1d8+4 C; critical staggered [DC 13]) or frag grenade II +10 (explode [15 ft., 2d6 P, DC 13])

Offensive Abilities: ferocious charge, fighting styles (blitz)

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +3 Con: +1 Wis: +0 Int: +1 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +15 (+23 to climb), Intimidate +10, Survival +10

Languages: Common; limited telepathy 30 ft.

Gear: officer ceremonial plate, frostbite-class zero rifle with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each), tactical swoop hammer, frag grenades II (2)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: any

Description

Uplifted animals are nonsapient creatures modified to increase their cognitive ability to full self-awareness, and sometimes also to make their physical forms better able to manipulate tools. Uplifted bears are among the most common uplifted animals, although who uplifted them and how are details lost to the Gap.

Uplifted bears have modified bodies that give them nimble hands with opposable thumbs. They retain a normal bear’s bulk and power, with claws that can rip through modern armor. Alongside their brute strength, uplifted bears have a keen intellect and the ability to communicate via telepathy, which most choose to do rather than vocalize gruffly from what is still a bear’s muzzle. An uplifted bear can be 5 feet tall at the shoulder when on all fours but tower up to 10 feet when moving bipedally. An adult bear weighs 1,200 pounds. These modifications and traits are genetic and can be passed down by mating pairs of uplifted bears.

Many uplifted bears find success in scientific endeavors, but they are most comfortable when they can be outside regularly in a natural, vegetated environment. Though this characteristic is not universal, it has led to uplifted bears gaining a reputation as poor crew members in orbital stations and long-haul expeditions. Others also assume the bears are best suited for exploring habitable worlds and cataloging flora and fauna.

Uplifted bears are sometimes rumored to have violent temperaments, but their personalities are as varied as those of any sapient species. Some uplifted bears take great pleasure in playing to this stereotype when they meet other people, drawing out the biased assumptions of the ill-informed, and then mocking them. Conversely, giving truth to the generality, a number of organized crime kingpins are uplifted bears who find they can threaten with their bulk when they can’t convince with their wits.

Small communities of uplifted bears can be found in the Pact Worlds, especially on higher-gravity planetoids in the Diaspora. Members of such settlements attempt to uncover their traditions by studying any pre- Gap relics they can find and to establish new traditions by building stable societies. Many young uplifted bears become frustrated with this focus on the past, however, and some leave their homes to escape it.

Uplifted bears feel a kinship for animals and animal-like humanoids, often preferring their company. They relate well to shirrens, though uplifted bears are more reserved than the enthusiastic insectile species. Much as many shirrens fear the Swarm and its potential to reassimilate them, some uplifted bears fear that whoever created them might return and put a dark spin on the gift of sapience the bears were given.

An uplifted bear exploration team exploring the Vast recently discovered a planet in the Ferra system full of skyscraper-sized trees and unpopulated by sentient creatures. Since this report, a small but vocal contingent of uplifted bears has begun calling for their kind to claim the planet as their home world.

Uplifted Bear Constellate

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

N Large magical (beast)

Init.: +4 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +14

Defense

HP: 108 RP: 4

EAC: 20 KAC: 22

Fort: +11 Ref: +11 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: claw +18 (2d6+12 S) or static shock truncheon +18 (1d12+12 E; critical arc 1d4)

Ranged: red star plasma pistol +15 (1d8+7 E & F; critical burn 1d8)

Offensive Abilities: ferocious charge, flashing strikes, stellar revelations (black hole [25-ft. radius, pull 15 ft., DC 15], dark matter [DR 2/—], reflection)

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +4 Con: +1 Wis: +0 Int: +1 Cha: +2

Skills: Athletics +19 (+27 to climb), Intimidate +14, Mysticism +14

Languages: Common; limited telepathy 30 ft.

Gear: estex suit III, red star plasma pistol with 2 highcapacity batteries (40 charges each), static shock truncheon with 2 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary

Description

Uplifted animals are nonsapient creatures modified to increase their cognitive ability to full self-awareness, and sometimes also to make their physical forms better able to manipulate tools. Uplifted bears are among the most common uplifted animals, although who uplifted them and how are details lost to the Gap.

Uplifted bears have modified bodies that give them nimble hands with opposable thumbs. They retain a normal bear’s bulk and power, with claws that can rip through modern armor. Alongside their brute strength, uplifted bears have a keen intellect and the ability to communicate via telepathy, which most choose to do rather than vocalize gruffly from what is still a bear’s muzzle. An uplifted bear can be 5 feet tall at the shoulder when on all fours but tower up to 10 feet when moving bipedally. An adult bear weighs 1,200 pounds. These modifications and traits are genetic and can be passed down by mating pairs of uplifted bears.

Many uplifted bears find success in scientific endeavors, but they are most comfortable when they can be outside regularly in a natural, vegetated environment. Though this characteristic is not universal, it has led to uplifted bears gaining a reputation as poor crew members in orbital stations and long-haul expeditions. Others also assume the bears are best suited for exploring habitable worlds and cataloging flora and fauna.

Uplifted bears are sometimes rumored to have violent temperaments, but their personalities are as varied as those of any sapient species. Some uplifted bears take great pleasure in playing to this stereotype when they meet other people, drawing out the biased assumptions of the ill-informed, and then mocking them. Conversely, giving truth to the generality, a number of organized crime kingpins are uplifted bears who find they can threaten with their bulk when they can’t convince with their wits.

Small communities of uplifted bears can be found in the Pact Worlds, especially on higher-gravity planetoids in the Diaspora. Members of such settlements attempt to uncover their traditions by studying any pre- Gap relics they can find and to establish new traditions by building stable societies. Many young uplifted bears become frustrated with this focus on the past, however, and some leave their homes to escape it.

Uplifted bears feel a kinship for animals and animal-like humanoids, often preferring their company. They relate well to shirrens, though uplifted bears are more reserved than the enthusiastic insectile species. Much as many shirrens fear the Swarm and its potential to reassimilate them, some uplifted bears fear that whoever created them might return and put a dark spin on the gift of sapience the bears were given.

An uplifted bear exploration team exploring the Vast recently discovered a planet in the Ferra system full of skyscraper-sized trees and unpopulated by sentient creatures. Since this report, a small but vocal contingent of uplifted bears has begun calling for their kind to claim the planet as their home world.

Vlaka Handler

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

NG Medium humanoid (vlaka)

Init.: +2 Senses: blinded, blindsight (hearing) 60 ft., blindsight (scent) 30 ft. Perception: +13

Defense

HP: 80 RP: 4

EAC: 18 KAC: 19

Fort: +5 Ref: +7 Will: +9

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: tactical knife +12 (2d4+6 S)

Ranged: corona laser pistol +14 (2d4+6 F; critical burn 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +2 Con: +0 Wis: +0 Int: +3 Cha: +5

Skills: Culture +13, Diplomacy +18, Medicine +18, Piloting +13, Sense Motive +18

Languages: Common, Vlakan (spoken, signed, and tactile)

Gear: freebooter armor II, corona laser pistol with 2 batteries (20 charges each), tactical knife

Ecology

Environment: any (Lajok)

Organization: solitary or pair

Special Abilities

Buoy (Ex) As a standard action, a vlaka can spend 1 Resolve Point to restore 1 RP to an ally within 30 feet. A vlaka can’t use this ability again until she has taken a 10-minute rest to regain Stamina Points. This is a sense-dependent, mind-affecting ability.

Description

Wolflike creatures with thick fur, vlakas hail from a doomed planet called Lajok, an arctic world in the Vast that is the most distant from its system’s dying star. Life is barely sustainable on Lajok, and as its sun grows dimmer, it might be able to sustain an ecosphere for only a few more centuries. Some vlakas respond to this knowledge by building strong communities that can last as long as possible on their home world, but others travel among the stars seeking a longer-term solution.

Vlaka fur is usually white with large patches of pale blue, gray, or black, and it provides them protection against all but the most bitter cold. Around twothirds of vlakas are born blind or deaf. Although they have long had access to magic and technology that can mitigate or remove such conditions, not all vlakas choose to do so, valuing the cultural touchstones such as language and perspective variances that are associated with differing ways of sensing the world. A typical vlaka stands 5-1/2 to 6-1/2 feet tall and weighs between 175 and 250 lbs.

Vlakas can appear unnervingly serious, but they’re acutely attuned to the emotional state of others, and they offer friendly encouragement when they sense it might be helpful. Vlakas emphasize on the well-being of the group over the individual, a practice that evolved from survival strategies required to thrive in the tundra of Lajok. While not wholly self-sacrificing, vlakas go to great lengths to assist, protect, and encourage their friends, colleagues, and kin. Vlakas frown upon self-aggrandizing leadership, and they respect those who display wisdom, listen the most, and speak the least.

Most vlaka groups are led by councils whose members rotate between roles and dutifully carry out the will of their constituents rather than seeking political power for themselves. Vlakas who travel with other races often find themselves thrust into leadership positions thanks to their penchant for working for the benefit of and listening to their allies. Most vlakas accept such responsibilities but deflect any unwarranted respect afforded them solely due to their title.

A few vlakas who visited the Pact Worlds before the Absalom Pact was signed served as a bridge between Eox and other worlds. Vlakas have since become famous as dependable go-betweens for groups seeking genuine accord. A vlaka might even work with clients who have been bad actors in the past, hoping to find a situation beneficial to all sides and to see ethical improvement in future behavior.

Many sapient creatures find themselves drawn to the camaraderie vlakas offer, but others try to take advantage of their openness. Vlakas who grow weary of the strife among other races might withdraw to focus on working with animals or machines. However, most vlakas seek well-intentioned groups of like-minded starfarers to do some good in a galaxy that can be callous and brutal.

Vlaka Tracker

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 2 XP: 600

LN Medium humanoid (vlaka)

Init.: +4 Senses: blindsight (scent) 30 ft., deafened, low-light vision Perception: +7

Defense

HP: 23 RP: 3

EAC: 13 KAC: 14

Fort: +3 Ref: +5 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: tactical baton +6 (1d4+2 B)

Ranged: static arc pistol +8 (1d6+2 E; critical arc 2)

Offensive Abilities: target tracking

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +2 Con: +1 Wis: +0 Int: +4 Cha: +0

Skills: Computers +12, Engineering +12, Life Science +7, Medicine +12, Stealth +7

Languages: Common, Vlakan (spoken, signed, and tactile)

Gear: freebooter armor I, static arc pistol with 2 batteries (20 charges each), tactical baton

Ecology

Environment: any (Lajok)

Organization: solitary, pair, or pack (3–5)

Special Abilities

Buoy (Ex) As a standard action, a vlaka can spend 1 Resolve Point to restore 1 RP to an ally within 30 feet. A vlaka can’t use this ability again until she has taken a 10-minute rest to regain Stamina Points. This is a sense-dependent, mind-affecting ability.

Deaf (Ex) This vlaka tracker cannot attempt Perception checks to listen and is immune to effects that rely on hearing to function.

Description

Wolflike creatures with thick fur, vlakas hail from a doomed planet called Lajok, an arctic world in the Vast that is the most distant from its system’s dying star. Life is barely sustainable on Lajok, and as its sun grows dimmer, it might be able to sustain an ecosphere for only a few more centuries. Some vlakas respond to this knowledge by building strong communities that can last as long as possible on their home world, but others travel among the stars seeking a longer-term solution.

Vlaka fur is usually white with large patches of pale blue, gray, or black, and it provides them protection against all but the most bitter cold. Around twothirds of vlakas are born blind or deaf. Although they have long had access to magic and technology that can mitigate or remove such conditions, not all vlakas choose to do so, valuing the cultural touchstones such as language and perspective variances that are associated with differing ways of sensing the world. A typical vlaka stands 5-1/2 to 6-1/2 feet tall and weighs between 175 and 250 lbs.

Vlakas can appear unnervingly serious, but they’re acutely attuned to the emotional state of others, and they offer friendly encouragement when they sense it might be helpful. Vlakas emphasize on the well-being of the group over the individual, a practice that evolved from survival strategies required to thrive in the tundra of Lajok. While not wholly self-sacrificing, vlakas go to great lengths to assist, protect, and encourage their friends, colleagues, and kin. Vlakas frown upon self-aggrandizing leadership, and they respect those who display wisdom, listen the most, and speak the least.

Most vlaka groups are led by councils whose members rotate between roles and dutifully carry out the will of their constituents rather than seeking political power for themselves. Vlakas who travel with other races often find themselves thrust into leadership positions thanks to their penchant for working for the benefit of and listening to their allies. Most vlakas accept such responsibilities but deflect any unwarranted respect afforded them solely due to their title.

A few vlakas who visited the Pact Worlds before the Absalom Pact was signed served as a bridge between Eox and other worlds. Vlakas have since become famous as dependable go-betweens for groups seeking genuine accord. A vlaka might even work with clients who have been bad actors in the past, hoping to find a situation beneficial to all sides and to see ethical improvement in future behavior.

Many sapient creatures find themselves drawn to the camaraderie vlakas offer, but others try to take advantage of their openness. Vlakas who grow weary of the strife among other races might withdraw to focus on working with animals or machines. However, most vlakas seek well-intentioned groups of like-minded starfarers to do some good in a galaxy that can be callous and brutal.

Void Zombie

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 1 XP: 400

NE Medium undead

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +5

Defense

HP: 22

EAC: 11 KAC: 15

Fort: +3 Ref: +3 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: slam +8 (1d6+5 B) or feeding tendril +8 (1d6+5 P plus blood drain)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +2 Con:Wis: +0 Int:Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +10

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: any

Special Abilities

Blood Drain (Ex) If a void zombie hits a living creature with its feeding tendril, it drains that creature’s blood, dealing 2 Strength damage before the tendril detaches.

Susceptible to Salt Water (Ex) A splash of salt water deals 1d6 damage to a void zombie, and full immersion in salt water deals 4d6 damage per round.

Description

Warmonger Devil (Levaloch)

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

LE Large outsider (devil)

Init.: +3 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., see in darkness Perception: +19

Defense

HP: 105

EAC: 19 KAC: 21

Fort: +11 Ref: +9 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., climb 40 ft.

Melee: sintered trident +17 (2d8+12 P) or claw +17 (1d6+12 S)

Ranged: corona laser rifle +15 (2d6+7 F; critical burn 1d6) or nyfiber net +15 (entangle)

Offensive Abilities: merciless blow

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +3 Con: +4 Wis: +3 Int: +2 Cha: +2

Skills: Acrobatics +14, Athletics +14 (+22 to climb), Engineering +14, Intimidate +14, Mysticism +14, Stealth +14

Languages: Celestial, Draconic, Infernal; telepathy 100 ft.

Gear: sintered trident with integrated corona laser rifle with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each), nyfiber net

Ecology

Environment: any (Hell)

Organization: solitary, pair, or squadron (3–18)

Special Abilities

Construct Form (Ex) Despite being true devils, levalochs have a number of immunities common to constructs. They are immune to ability damage, ability drain, death effects, disease, energy drain, exhaustion, fatigue, necromancy effects, negative levels, nonlethal damage, paralysis, sleep, and stunning.

Hellstrider (Su) Difficult terrain doesn’t hamper a levaloch’s movement.

Merciless Blow (Su) If a levaloch hits an entangled foe with an attack, the target takes 2d6 additional damage of the same type.

Phalanx (Ex) Devils gain a +1 morale bonus to attack rolls and AC while adjacent to a levaloch.

Description

Warpmoth Swarm

Source: Alien Archive 2

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

N Fine vermin (swarm)

Init.: +5 Senses: blindsense (vibration) 30 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +13

Aura: disorienting (15 ft., DC 14)

Defense

HP: 90

EAC: 18 KAC: 20

Fort: +8 Ref: +10 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 30 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: swarm attack (2d6 P)

Offensive Abilities: distraction (DC 14)

Statistics

Str: -5 Dex: +5 Con: +3 Wis: +0 Int:Cha: -3

Skills: Acrobatics +13 (+21 to fly)

Ecology

Environment: any vacuum

Organization: solitary, pair, or delusion (3–6)

Special Abilities

Disorienting Aura (Ex)

Description

Even the vacuum of space has bugs. Most of these void-dwelling vermin are harmless, but some are dangerous or predatory.

Asteroid lice and planetoid beetles feed on minerals in the rock of their airless habitats. Asteroid lice are communal, but planetoid beetles are territorial, tolerating only one mate. These creatures and their eggs can float in space to a new home. However, careless quarrying and shipping have accelerated their spread through the galaxy.

Xenobiologists theorize many space vermin evolved in special circumstances. Necropedes were once centipede-like scavengers on Eox; they now have a bite that can digest undead flesh. A warpmoth is like a glowing blue-white speck attracted to moving light, such as other warpmoths or passing starships. Gathering in swarms and following ships helps the moths feed and mate. Comet wasps create nests in frozen interstellar bodies. These icy, venomous vespids lay their eggs in living creatures.

Aeon Guard Specialist

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

LE Medium humanoid (human)

Init.: +8 Senses: blindsense (emotion) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +15

Defense

HP: 102

EAC: 22 KAC: 23

Fort: +9 Ref: +9 Will: +10, +2 vs. disease and poison

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., fly 30 ft. (jetpack, average)

Melee: tactical knife +13 (2d4+9 S)

Ranged: AG accelerator rifle +15 (3d4+7 P) or corona laser pistol +15 (2d4+7 F; critical 1d4 burn)

Offensive Abilities: debilitating trick, trick attack +4d8

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +5 Con: +1 Wis: +2 Int: +4 Cha: +1

Skills: Acrobatics +20, Athletics +15, Computers +20, Piloting +15, Profession (soldier) +15, Stealth +20

Languages: Azlanti, Common, 4 additional languages

Gear: AG SpecOps armor (

Ecology

Environment: any (Azlanti Star Empire)

Organization: solitary, pair, strike team (1 Aeon Guard specialist plus 7–12 Aeon Guards), or troop (1 Aeon Guard specialist plus 21–48 Aeon Guards)

Description

The powerful Azlanti Star Empire maintains its hold on its subject systems through the might of its military, which is divided into two arms: the Imperial Fleet and the Aeon Guard. Aeon Guards are the elite infantry of the Star Empire; they serve as marines aboard the warships of the Imperial Fleet, protect imperial government and military installations, quell dissent and crush rebellions, and spearhead invasions to conquer and occupy new territories for the Star Empire.

Aeon Guards swear personal oaths of loyalty to the Aeon Throne, and only death in service to the empire can release them from their duty. Only humans are accepted into the ranks of the Aeon Guard, and all of them must be paragons of the Azlanti race.

Aeon Guards are readily identifiable by their distinctive armor, which incorporates the magic of the empire’s legendary

, and many are given cybernetic and biotechnological augmentations in addition to their standard-issue gear. The Aeon Guard stat block on page 6 represents a rank-and-file trooper who can be found almost anywhere within the Azlanti Star Empire or on one of its starships. Aeon Guard specialists are capable of operating for weeks or even months at a time with little or no support, carrying out secretive missions of espionage, infiltration, reconnaissance, or sabotage.

Acrochor

Source: Starfinder #4: The Ruined Clouds

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

N Medium animal

Init.: +6 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +16

Defense

HP: 128

EAC: 20 KAC: 22

Fort: +12 Ref: +12 Will: +7

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., climb 30 ft.

Melee: bite +19 (3d4+12 P plus grab)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +6 Con: +2 Wis: +0 Int: -5 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +21 (+29 to climb), Stealth +16, Survival +16

Ecology

Environment: warm hills or mountains (Nejeor V)

Organization: solitary or pair

Special Abilities

Constrict (Ex) When an acrochor successfully renews a grapple or a pin against an opponent, it automatically deals 3d4+12 bludgeoning damage to that creature.

Description

The serpentine acrochors originally evolved on the fifth planet of the Nejeor system, a rocky and volcanically active world, where they slithered among crevasses and lava tubes, hunting small prey such as the furry mammalian knuggs and creeping up on jaexus birds’ nests to feast on the dusky eggs. Acrochors usually grow up to 8 to 12 feet in length and almost 1 foot in diameter. They are red and black in color with tough, knobby skin and a cluster of visual sensors that allow the creatures to see well even in dim light. Acrochors’ mouths are on the undersides of their bodies, and they usually keep them closed except when attacking.

An acrochor often begins attacking its prey by lashing out with surprising speed to bite with jaws filled with razor-sharp teeth. Once its fangs are firmly implanted, the acrochor whips its tail to coil several times around the victim’s body, using its powerful musculature to squeeze the life from the unfortunate prey. When its prey is dead, the acrochor leisurely tears into the flesh in a bloody and gruesome fashion. If an acrochor takes down a victim of its size or larger, the acrochor might need several days to devour the corpse, but it can digest both fresh and rotting meat without trouble.

After mating, an acrochor lays its fertilized eggs in a thermal vent or other warm place. Over the next day, the parent acrochor eats as much as it can, often consuming pieces of obsidian or other volcanic glass in the process. It then enters a state of hibernation in close proximity to its eggs, which incubate over the next few months. The acrochor’s stomach acids slowly dissolve the volcanic glass as it sleeps, providing it with the minerals it needs to survive. Despite its dormant state, the acrochor has an almost supernatural connection to its eggs, waking the moment they hatch or if anything disturbs them.

Aeon Stone Network

Source: Starfinder #8: Escape from the Prison Moon

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

N Fine construct (magical)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +14

Defense

HP: 91

EAC: 19 KAC: 20

Fort: +6 Ref: +10 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: fly 40 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: swarm attack (1d6+9 B plus distraction [DC 17])

Offensive Abilities: telekinetic whirlwind

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +5 Con:Wis: +3 Int: +1 Cha: +1

Skills: Computers +14, Engineering +14, Life Science +19, Mysticism +19, Physical Science +19

Languages: Azlanti (can’t speak); telepathy 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: any

Special Abilities

Aeon Upgrade (Su) An aeon stone network benefits from one aeon stone with an item level of its CR or lower.

Remote Hack (Ex) An aeon stone network has the remote hack feature as if it were a mechanic of a level equal to its CR.

Telekinetic Whirlwind (Su) Once per day as a standard action, an aeon stone network can spiral around a Large or smaller creature or object that is completely in its space, negating gravity for that target while it’s inside the vortex. The network can remain in this form for 4 rounds, but it can return to its normal form as a move action at any time. The target creature or object moves with the aeon stone network. A creature caught in the telekinetic whirlwind is off-target and must attempt a DC 17 Reflex saving throw at the end of each of its turns. On a failed save, the creature becomes off-kilter until the end of its next turn or until it leaves the aeon stone network’s space, whichever comes first. A creature can leave the aeon stone network’s space if it has some way to move itself in zero gravity or if, as a standard action, it succeeds at an Acrobatics skill check (DC = 10 + the network’s KAC). On a success, the target moves to a square adjacent to the aeon stone network.

Description

Aeon stone networks are created from specially enhanced aeon stones

Anacite Laborer

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

LN Medium construct (technological)

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +19

Defense

HP: 100

EAC: 19 KAC: 20

Fort: +4 Ref: +4 Will: +8

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: plasma cutter +16 (1d8+12 F)

Ranged: electrical burst +14 (1d8+7 E)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +2 Con:Wis: +0 Int: +4 Cha: +0

Skills: Computers +19, Engineering +19, Piloting +14, Stealth +14

Languages: Common; shortwave 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any (Aballon)

Organization: solitary, pair, or crew (3-8)

Special Abilities

Reconfigure (Ex) Anacite laborers are capable of adapting and improving their designs. An anacite laborer has a number of built-in abilities equal to its CR divided by 3 (minimum 1), chosen from the list below. An anacite laborer can change these abilities by spending 1 uninterrupted hour for each ability it wants to change. The anacite laborer must also have access to an appropriate workspace for the duration. An ability can be gained only once unless stated otherwise. In addition, modifications other than those listed here might exist.

  • Advanced treads that increase its base speed to 60 feet.
  • A sensor that grants blindsight (vibration) 120 feet.
  • Elongated arms that extend its reach by 5 feet.
  • A modified chassis that grants a burrow, climb, or swim speed equal to its base speed. This ability can be taken multiple times. Its effects do not stack. Each time it is taken, it applies to a new movement type.
  • Reinforced systems granting resistance 10 against a single energy type (acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic). This ability can be taken multiple times. Its effects do not stack. Each time it is taken, it applies to a new energy type.
  • Specialized plating that increases its AC by 2.
Shortwave (Ex) An anacite can communicate wirelessly. This acts as telepathy, but only with other creatures with this ability or constructs with the technological subtype.

Sunlight Dependency (Ex)

Description

Anacites are native to Aballon, the Pact World closest to the sun. A race of machines left behind by eons-departed masters, these constructs developed the capacity for evolution and self-improvement, creating an entire mechanical ecosystem.

The most common design for anacites is a basic arthropodan form of silvery metal, with multiple legs for efficient travel and claws or manipulators for accomplishing their assigned tasks. Depending on their role, however, an anacite might be anything from a bulldozer-sized mining specialist to a floating electronic brain designed for advanced problem-solving, and even those anacites who fit the stereotypical metal-insect design usually have a modification or two, and almost all anacites can reconfigure parts of themselves to adapt to their circumstances.

In the uncounted millennia since the departure of the so-called “First Ones,” anacites have not been idle. The two primary factions of anacites, Those Who Wait and Those Who Become, have very different ideas of their purpose in life, yet the two are more alike than different. While they variously wait for the First Ones to return or work toward taking on their progenitors’ mantle, anacites endlessly strive to acquire wealth and influence in preparation for their great goal’s fulfillment.

While “anacite” officially refers only to the sentient varieties of Aballonian machines—those capable of learning and participating in Aballonian society—many offworlders use it as a catchall term for the world’s mechanical life. Dragonflylike wingbots are an example of Aballonian technobiology. These artificial creatures lack basic sentience yet nevertheless reproduce and fill one of the planet’s ecological niches. These 4-foot-long machines whir from ridge to ridge on wings glittering with solar panels, feeding on the blazing light of the sun. Wingbots can be territorial, and they occasionally attack offworlders or other anacites.

Anhamut

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 10 XP: 9,600

LN Medium outsider (inevitable)

Init.: +3 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +19

Defense

HP: 180

EAC: 23 KAC: 24

Fort: +11 Ref: +9 Will: +13

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 40 ft. (Su, perfect, discorporated form only)

Melee: nanite blade +21 (2d8+12 S; critical nanite burst [DC 19])

Ranged: electric discharge +19 (3d4+10 E)

Offensive Abilities: inevitable onslaught

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +3 Con: +2 Wis: +2 Int: +5 Cha: +8

Skills: Computers +24, Culture +19, Diplomacy +24, Engineering +24, Sense Motive +19

Languages: truespeech

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Discorporation (Ex) An anhamut’s robotic body can discorporate its component nanites into a swarm of Diminutive creatures as a standard action. Reincorporating its parts into its regular form is also a standard action. While in its discorporated form, an anhamut cannot use its nanite blade, but it gains swarm immunities and can fly. In addition, a discorporated anhamut can interface directly with many forms of technology, and it counts as having a hacking kit when attempting Computers skill checks. While an anhamut is in discorporated form, its total Stealth bonus increases to +24.

Electric Discharge (Ex) As a standard action, an anhamut can generate a powerful electric charge from its blade (or between the individual nanomachines that make up its discorporated form) and launch this charge as a ranged attack against EAC at a target within 60 feet.

Inevitable Onslaught (Ex) When an anhamut makes a full attack, it can make up to three melee attacks instead of two melee attacks. It takes a –6 penalty to these attacks instead of a –4 penalty.

Nanite Blade (Ex) An anhamut’s sword is composed of the same nanites as the outsider itself, and functions as if it has the axiomatic and nanite weapon fusions.

Description

Atrocite

Source: Starfinder #4: The Ruined Clouds

CR: 10 XP: 9,600

CE Medium outsider (chaotic)

Init.: +2 Senses: blindsense (life) 30 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +19

Defense

HP: 147

EAC: 23 KAC: 22

Fort: +9 Ref: +9 Will: +15

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., fly 40 ft. (Su, average)

Melee: slam +17 (2d8+15 B)

Ranged: void bolt +19 (3d4+10 force; critical severe wound [DC 19])

Offensive Abilities: words of destruction

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +2 Con: +2 Wis: +3 Int: +0 Cha: +8

Skills: Intimidate +24, Mysticism +24, Sense Motive +19

Languages: Abyssal, Common; telepathy (100 ft.)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary or cult (1 plus 13-20 cultists)

Special Abilities

Words of Destruction (Su) Once per day as a swift action, the many mouths of an atrocite can speak words of total devastation. For the next 3 rounds, any chaotic evil worshiper of the Devourer within 60 feet adds the wound critical hit effect to all its attacks (in addition to any existing critical hit effect); if an attack already has the wound critical hit effect, it gains the severe wound critical hit effect instead. If the atrocite takes damage at any point during this 3-round period, the effects of its words of destruction end immediately.

Description

The monstrous atrocites are potent agents of the Devourer. Each atrocite has a unique form roughly similar to that of a member of some sentient species. If the original form has eyes, the atrocite’s are instead empty voids. If it has hands, each holds a fanged mouth that speaks of destruction. A gray haze forms above atrocites, constantly crackling with red energy and serving as the source of their void bolts.

Although they are outsiders, atrocites dwell primarily on the Material Plane, searching through space for places ripe for the depredations of a Devourer cult or helping extant cults execute massive acts of destruction beyond their normal capacity. An atrocite remains with a cult only so long as its presence and guidance clearly increases the recruiting power or destructive capacity of the cult, leaving as soon as it can to further spread its message of infinite unmaking.

Barathu (Early Stage)

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 2 XP: 600

LN Medium aberration

Init.: +0 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +13

Defense

HP: 23

EAC: 13 KAC: 14

Fort: +3 Ref: +1 Will: +7

Offense

Speed: fly 30 ft. (Ex, average)

Melee: slam +8 (1d4+3 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +0 Con: +2 Wis: +4 Int: +1 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +13, Diplomacy +8, Life Science +8, Sense Motive +13

Languages: Brethedan, Common; limited telepathy 30 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any sky (Bretheda)

Organization: solitary or herd (4–12 plus 2–5 barathus)

Special Abilities

Along for the Ride (Ex) Early stage barathus are not experienced enough to helpfully combine with mature barathus but can still physically merge with them for protection. An early stage barathu can combine with a mature barathu via the latter’s combine ability. Early stage barathus that are part of a combined creature contribute their Hit Points but not adaptations.

Early Stage Adaptation (Ex) An early stage barathu’s body is mutable and can adapt to many different situations. Once every 1d4 rounds as a swift action, an early stage barathu can reshape its body and adjust its chemistry to gain one of the following qualities. The adaptation lasts until the beginning of the early stage barathu’s next turn. Unlike more mature barathus, early stage barathus are not generally capable of more complex adaptations.

  • Upper limb refinements enable the barathu to add an additional amount of damage to melee attacks equal to its Strength modifier.
  • A toughened dermal layer grants its a +1 racial bonus to AC.
  • Developed lower limbs grant it a base speed of 15 feet.
  • Molecular-level modifications grant it resistance 2 against a single energy type (acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic).
  • Elongated limbs extend its reach to 10 feet.

Description

Barathus are the sentient apex of Bretheda’s gas-giant ecosystem, blimp-like creatures vaguely reminiscent of jellyfish, with several unusual evolutionary adaptations. The first is their ability to rewrite their own genetic code instinctively and at will, adjusting their own biology to allow them to manufacture a huge array of substances—and even advanced biotechnology— within the crucibles of their own bodies. Yet while this ability makes them quite successful in the Pact Worlds economy, and has deeply influenced their culture’s understanding of wealth and trade, their more notable adaptation is the ability to combine with others of their kind into larger, hive-minded superentities. These mergings create not merely amalgams of their component beings, but entirely new entities with unique and independent consciousnesses, yet which in turn often disband back into their component individuals after a particular need or threat has passed.

Barathu culture tends to be easygoing but hard for some other races to understand, as the barathus’ frequent merging makes the concept of “self” somewhat nebulous to them. Young barathus who grow up surrounded by humanoids are an exception, as they are better able to appreciate the mindsets of creatures who exist in static, solitary configurations. Compared to older barathus, early stage barathus are more adventurous and individualistic, and their adaptation to the humanoid mindset makes it more difficult for them to merge completely with others of their kind. Most of these early stage barathus grow out of this phase, gaining the ability to fully integrate with others, yet recent generations have seen more and more barathus deliberately clinging to their juvenile mindsets. While plenty of barathus remain discrete entities for most of their lives, barathus nearing the ends of their lives often merge with massive, permanent combinatory entities that serve as corporations, governments, or cultural repositories.

Crest-Eater

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 4 XP: 1,200

N Large magical (beast)

Init.: +1 Senses: bone tracker, darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 54

EAC: 16 KAC: 19

Fort: +8 Ref: +8 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 60 ft.

Melee: bite +13 (1d6+7 P plus 1 con)

Ranged: venom spit +10 (1 Con)

Offensive Abilities: bone eater

Statistics

Str: +3 Dex: +1 Con: +3 Wis: +1 Int: -2 Cha: -1

Skills: Stealth +15, Survival +10

Languages: Kasatha (can’t speak any language)

Ecology

Environment: warm deserts (Kasath)

Organization: solitary, pair, or pride (3-6)

Special Abilities

Bone Eater (Su) A crest-eater’s bite delivers a magical venom that dissolves certain minerals in its victim’s body, liquefying that creature’s bones. Each bite attack that deals damage also deals 1 Constitution damage. A target can negate this damage with a successful DC 13 Fortitude save.

Bone Tracker (Ex) A crest-eater’s sense of smell is keenly attuned to the minerals it needs to survive. It can sniff out natural deposits of calcium, and it gains blindsense (scent) against creatures that have taken Constitution damage from its attacks in the past hour.

Venom Spit (Su) As a standard action, a crest-eater can make a ranged attack against the KAC of a single target within 30 feet, spitting its bone-liquefying venom. If struck, the target must succeed at a DC 13 Fortitude save or take 1 Constitution damage.

Description

Terrifying predators that roam the deserts and canyons of Kasath, crest-eaters earned their moniker thanks to their highly specialized diets: the hulking beasts feed almost exclusively on bone, and when attacking kasathas, they usually tear the humanoids’ heads from their bodies and then quickly and messily devour the bony crests within. A crest-eater has an advanced metabolism that processes the minerals it consumes to grow a large protrusion—a cross between antlers and a shell—from the crest-eater’s head and back. This outgrowth isn’t just made out of bone, however; it contains tiny fragments of reflective compounds that act like thousands of solar panels, thus providing the remainder of the nutrients the crest-eaters need to survive. As they age, the beasts grow more and more elaborate protrusions, increasing their surface area in order to store reserves of minerals for lean times. Crest-eaters also produce a venom that liquefies minerals, which can strip natural deposits of these resources from nearby rocks as easily as it melts the bones of their prey.

Crest-eaters have a muscular frame supported by four stout legs. The claws on a crest-eater’s legs are somewhat blunt, having evolved for scrabbling over rocks. A pair of thick limbs attached to the creature’s lower back area can function as another pair of legs, allowing it to easily navigate rocky terrain or distribute its bulk on shifting sands. However, the sharper claws on these extra appendages are mainly used for tearing through its prey’s flesh to reach the bones. A crest-eater’s vicious teeth are capable of delivering painful bites and injecting its devastating venom. Despite its rather reptilian appearance, the crest-eater shares many similarities to mammals, including a steady body temperature and the ability to bear live young.

Just as their biology skirts the edge of reptilian standards, so too does crest-eaters’ behavior. They are exceptionally social and loving animals, forming small prides of unrelated adults to hunt prey, dig out mineral deposits, and guard one another while they sleep. Many bold young hunters have fallen after slaying a single crest-eater, only to find its halfdozen compatriots rising from the sand around them. Cresteaters give birth to one or two young after a long pregnancy, during which the female grows increasingly ravenous for flesh and water, and an entire pride may take to hunting and aggressively defending water sources to feed a single pregnant mother’s needs. Newborn crest-eaters can dissolve bones immediately, though they are cautious predators until they begin to grow their first antler-shell around 1 year later.

Crest-eaters that grow up in close proximity to other creatures often form close bonds with them, and thus they can be found traveling with small crowds of scavengers that pick parasites off their protrusions and snatch up any kills the mighty hunters leave behind. Despite the creatures’ social nature, especially large males become increasingly aggressive as they age and are often driven from their prides and the most reliable sources of food. Though a bit past their prime, these crest-eaters are still very dangerous, and they usually become unpredictable loners that attack desert communities without fear. It sometimes takes the collective effort of several heroes to either put down or drive off one of these wild beasts. Such an endeavor is rarely accomplished without casualties or major injuries.

Crest-eaters occupy a place of fear and reverence in distant kasathan history. The humanoids’ ancient ancestors saw the beasts as terrifying messengers of death, particularly because of their tendency to rip off a victim’s head and leave the remainder of the body unmolested. Today, the crest-eater is still feared but better understood, and kasathan scientists have extensively studied the unique crystals the beasts grow. These are now the foundation for kasathan solar technology. After millennia of kasathan contact with the wider galaxy, crest-eaters have spread to other worlds, both due to kasathan technology sometimes relying on the creatures’ power-generating capabilities and as a result of other races employing crest-eaters as guard beasts, trophies to hunt, or exotic pets. The Idari even brought crest-eaters along on its long voyage, though these are kept carefully contained; rumors of escaped and feral crest-eaters living in the ship’s ventilation shafts are assumed to be spurious.

Cybernetic Zombie

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 3 XP: 800

N Medium undead

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +8

Defense

HP: 40

EAC: 14 KAC: 16

Fort: +5 Ref: +5 Will: +4

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: slam +8 (1d6+5 B)

Ranged: integrated static arc pistol +11 (1d6+3 E; critical arc 2)

Offensive Abilities: self-destruct (1d6+3 E, DC 12)

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +4 Con:Wis: +1 Int:Cha: +1

Skills: Athletics +13

Gear: static arc pistol with 2 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, phalanx (3–12), or army (13+)

Special Abilities

Integrated Weapons (Ex) A cybernetic zombie’s ranged weapon is integrated into its body and can’t be disarmed.

Self-Destruct (Ex) A cybernetic zombie self-destructs when it is reduced to 0 HP, dealing an amount of electricity damage equal to 1d6 + the zombie’s CR to all creatures in a 10-foot-radius burst. A creature can attempt a Reflex saving throw to reduce this damage by half. This ability destroys any cybernetic or technological components that could have been salvaged from the zombie.

Description

The most commonly encountered undead in the galaxy are the mindless minions of greater undead (such as necrovites and vampires) or of powerful spellcasters (including both mystics and technomancers of all races). As creatures with no motivations of their own, undead minions can also be found leaderless in the remains of ruined structures on planetary surfaces, adrift in derelict spacecraft, and even floating through the void of space. Whether encountered as servants of a mastermind who coordinates their movements or as a mindless threat in the wake of a cataclysmic disaster, undead minions are always a force to be reckoned with and a scourge to the living.

Though there are countless types of mindless undead who serve as minions, the most common are cybernetic zombies, occult zombies, and skeletal undead. Both occult zombies and skeletal undead are animated by magical or supernatural forces and created either in dark necromantic rituals (including the

spell) or by strange and mysterious reactions between the Material and Negative Energy Planes. Cybernetic zombies, on the other hand, arise as the result of technological implants that continue to function after their hosts have died, causing the body to act in a sad, shambling imitation of real life. Without control from an external force, these three kinds of undead simply go through the motions of their former lives, without reason, purpose, or the promise of an end to their miserable existences.

In the Pact Worlds, most undead hail from the dead world of Eox and were created by the bone sages, though zombies and skeletal creatures are also found among the wreckage of ancient battlefields on Akiton and the enigmatic, alien structures on Aucturn. In contrast, cybernetic zombies are most often found on worlds with high levels of technological development, such as Aballon, Castrovel, and Verces.

Those cultists of Urgathoa who see undeath as the pinnacle of being surround themselves with undead minions, both to use their abilities to terrorize innocent folk and to study their physiology in order to become undead themselves. While these worshipers would prefer to become more intelligent undead creatures, they often find that their fate is to rise up as a skeleton or zombie. Priests of Pharasma, on the other hand, often go out of their way to destroy all undead creatures, especially their mindless minions.

Undead minions can be formed from the corpses of any type of creature, though most of those appearing in folklore from across the galaxy are animated versions of whatever culture is telling the tale. Humanoids tell of ambulatory corpses rising from their ritual burial grounds, while aberrations, dragons, and magical beasts have their own legends of mindless dead of their own species returning to plague the living. Whatever the undead creatures’ original form, they often maintain natural attacks and other physical characteristics of their living counterparts even in undeath, though their mindless nature means they lose the ability to carry out complex tactics, conduct intricate or detailed tasks, and cast spells or take other mentally engaging actions. Yet the creatures’ mindlessness makes them all the more frightening and threatening, as they can be neither reasoned with nor cowed.

Use the following template grafts to create other versions of the undead minions presented here.

Deh-Nolo

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 14 XP: 38,400

CE Large aberration

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +30

Defense

HP: 214

EAC: 27 KAC: 28

Fort: +12 Ref: +12 Will: +19

Offense

Speed: 20 ft., fly 40 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: bite +21 (6d6+17 P plus dominion bile)

Ranged: synthesized projectile +23 (4d8+14 P plus dominion bile or spell-slot sacrifice)

Offensive Abilities: brain collection

Spells Known: (CL 14th; melee +21)

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +4 Con: +6 Wis: +4 Int: +8 Cha: +4

Skills: Computers +25, Culture +25, Engineering +30, Life Science +30, Medicine +25, Mysticism +30, Physical Science +25

Languages: Aklo, Abyssal, Common, up to 4 other languages as determined by brain collection; telepathy 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Brain Collection (Ex) A deh-nolo can store up to four brains of Small or Medium creatures and use them to enhance its knowledge and power, learning a single language known by the former owner of each stored brain. A deh-nolo can extract a brain from a helpless opponent with a coup de grace action that kills the opponent, or it can do so as a standard action from a body that has been dead no longer than 1 minute.

Brain Dependency (Ex) A deh-nolo that has fewer than four collected brains gains 1 negative level for each missing brain. A deh-nolo’s caster level is reduced by 2 for each negative level it gains from missing brains, and a deh-nolo with no collected brains can’t cast any of its spells. These negative levels never become permanent, and they can be removed only by adding brains to the deh-nolo’s collection. The statistics presented here assume a deh-nolo with a full collection.

Open Pustules (Ex) When a deh-nolo takes more than 20 damage from a single attack, each creature adjacent to that deh-nolo must succeed at a DC 22 Reflex save or be sprayed with a foul poison as the pustules all over the deh-nolo’s body erupt. Creatures hit by this spray are exposed to dominion bile (see below).

Synthesized Projectile (Ex) Once per round as a standard action, a deh-nolo can concentrate the crystallized, metallic discharge it produces and expel it through a tear in its flesh. This attack deals 1d4 damage to the deh-nolo. A deh-nolo can fire the projectile at a target up to 60 feet away as a ranged attack that deals 4d8+14 piercing damage. A deh-nolo can augment the projectile in one of two ways. It can coat the projectile in dominion bile (see below) to poison its target, or it can sacrifice a spell slot to charge the projectile with energy. A projectile charged in this way deals an additional 1d6 acid, cold, electricity, or fire damage (deh-nolo’s choice) for each level of the spell slot sacrificed in this way.

Dominion Bile

Type poison (injury); Save Fortitude DC 22
Track Constitution (special); Frequency 1/round for 6 rounds
Effect progression track is Healthy—Weakened—Debilitated—Dead
Cure 2 consecutive saves

Description

Just as the neh-thalggus and yah-thelgaads among the Dominion of the Black make use of organic brains to power their magical abilities, so do deh-nolos extract and use other creatures’ brains to slake their never-ending thirst for knowledge. This shared penchant strikes well-deserved fear into the hearts of all thinking creatures in the universe, and many spacefarers know it is best to avoid ships with Dominion markings altogether.

Deh-nolos are brilliant engineers and inventors among the Dominion of the Black, merging technology and biological systems in twisted and devious ways that are stunningly seamless. These creations are unlike cybernetics, in that they are often grown rather than built, and they blur the lines between living organs and complex machines. Using vulgar ingenuity and their surprisingly adroit singular “arms,” deh-nolos designed and built the first Dominion starships, which are hybrid vessels with both organic and technological components. They also cultivated the first shipminds—oozes that pilot these biomechanical starships. In addition to these marvels of engineering, deh-nolos are adept at repairing most technological devices, no matter what civilization built them. When presented with a device with which it is unfamiliar, a deh-nolo attempts to collect the brain of a member of the species that produced it in the hopes that doing so will provide the aberration with some flash of insight.

Mostly organic beings, deh-nolos secrete a metallic discharge that shimmers with disturbing beauty in natural sunlight. Deh-nolos can concentrate this liquid to form foul crystals that they either use as ranged projectiles or work into components for their mechanical devices. Such machine parts are malformed, resembling incomplete living organs and atrophied body parts, and many have common technological connectors and partially completed circuitry. Some reckless scientists have harvested these bits from deh-nolos and plugged them into their equipment or their own bodies, with varying and unpredictable outcomes. Most of the time, the result is horrendous—and even deadly to the experimenter—but the practice occasionally creates functional, albeit macabre, technology. Installed in sensors and other devices with video or audio output, these components cause the images on their screens to appear disturbingly fragmented or amplify and distort sound into mind-shattering cacophonies. Implanted in a living creature, these parts horrendously mutate the host body and often wrack it with unceasing pain.

Like many other creatures among the Dominion of the Black, deh-nolos fabricate and weaponize their own toxins. Poison-filled glands grow in patches across these creatures’ bulky bodies, and anyone who ruptures one is exposed to the purulent fluid that sloshes within. Deh-nolos can also apply this toxic pus to the projectiles that they eject from their bodies, infecting those they strike.

Deh-nolos are not only extremely competent engineers, but also formidable spellcasters, weaving magic that, like their inventions, blurs the line between flesh and machine. With a thought, a deh-nolo can commandeer nearby technological devices, create a cloud of burning acid, or temporarily overwrite the DNA of a living creature to turn it into a twisted reflection of a robot. A deh-nolo uses its more offensive spells only in response to direct attacks, preferring to catch a single target unaware and render it helpless. From there, the aberration proceeds to carefully (and painfully, if the creature is still alive) extract its prey’s brain and store it in one of its four brain pods. Deh-nolos with even one empty brain pod often go out of their way to procure a fresh replacement, almost as if they were addicted to the knowledge stored within the gray matter. A deh-nolo with no stored brains is jittery and desperate, lashing out at any non-Dominion creatures it can find, even those with animal intelligence. Once it is able to use its full complement of abilities, such a deh-nolo seeks out more sophisticated brains to replace the simpler ones, unless a more pressing matter is at hand.

Deh-nolos use their psychic potential, which is inherent in most Dominion of the Black creatures, to fly with incredible dexterity. The eerie sight of their alien forms gliding silently through the air with no obvious means of propulsion is usually enough to send most sane onlookers fleeing for their lives.

Draelik

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 2 XP: 600

NE Medium humanoid (draelik)

Init.: +1 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +12

Defense

HP: 21

EAC: 13 KAC: 14

Fort: +3 Ref: +1 Will: +5, +2 vs. necromancy effects

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: None

Offensive Abilities: dark nova

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +1 Con: +2 Wis: +4 Int: +0 Cha: -1

Skills: Culture +7, Mysticism +12, Stealth +7 (+11 in dim light or darker)

Languages: Aklo, Common

Gear: freebooter armor I

Ecology

Environment: any (Great Shadar)

Organization: solitary, pair, or penumbra (3-8)

Special Abilities

Dark Matter (Su) This functions as the solarian stellar revelation of the same name. As a move action, the draelik can gain DR 2/— until he leaves graviton mode.

Dark Nova (Su) As a standard action, a draelik who is fully graviton-attuned can deal 2d6 negative energy damage to all creatures within 10 feet. A creature that succeeds at a DC 13 Reflex saving throw takes half damage. In addition, the light level of the affected area is reduced by one step for 1 round. After a draelik uses this ability, he immediately becomes unattuned.

Description

The Shadari Confederacy lies cloaked deep within an area known as the Kurzach Nebula: an immense cloud of ionized, dingy-colored gases that block most scans and make astrogation difficult. As such, this loose organization houses all manner of fugitives, itinerants, and other scoundrels, and it is led by the inhabitants of Great Shadar, a waterless planet orbiting this system’s dim star. These residents call themselves draeliks, and they are singularly united in support of the Confederacy’s lawless ideals. To outsiders, however, they often seem more beholden to the grotesque sceaduinars: extraplanar creatures from the Negative Energy Plane, and the main figures of the most prominent draelik faith.

Draeliks are gaunt humanoids who average 7 feet in height. They have vestigial gills on their necks and slightly webbed hands and feet that hint that they may have once been an aquatic race, even though their home world currently has no oceans or lakes. Instead of hair, draeliks have short bristles on their heads. The color of draeliks’ skin spans various shades of yellow, from mustard to saffron. Draeliks have three fingers and a thumb on each of their hands, and their limbs are slightly longer than those of humans.

The majority of draeliks have a mystical marking resembling a third eye that usually appears on the forehead. Known as Eyes of Enlightenment, these mark them as adherents of the philosophy of Ataxxea, a belief that pays homage to sceaduinars and finds entropy to be the most sublime force in the universe. Members of this faith don’t actively set out to destroy, but they do very little to prevent and reverse natural deterioration. They build only items that speed up this decay, mostly by using negative energy. This pseudoreligion is widespread throughout the Confederacy, and many races native to the nebula count themselves as followers, receiving the Eye of Enlightenment during a ritualistic process involving special inks distilled from dark energies. Many who get this tattoo gain powers similar to solarians who focus on the graviton aspects of their cycle.

While some outsiders mistakenly conflate the nihilistic philosophy of Ataxxea with that of the Cult of the Devourer, most draeliks find the comparison deeply offensive. To them, their path is a stately and dignified march toward the inevitable and ordained end of all things, while the Devourer’s followers cheapen the entire experience and ruin the work of generations by thrashing around in childlike tantrums, attempting to tear reality’s fabric instead of embracing its beautiful unraveling.

The few draeliks who don’t follow these entropic beliefs generally leave the Kurzach Nebula to seek their fortunes in the wider galaxy. Despite their rejection of their home world’s nihilism, however, they are often still drawn to careers that emphasize the deeply ingrained talents of their people, hiring themselves out as deceptive assassins, furtive thieves, or mystics of dubious morality. Draeliks encased in shining armor and fighting for the betterment of every race and creed are rare, and those who seek to shatter the mold must always contend with their inner demons, sometimes even struggling against foul temptations from sceaduinars who want to bring them back into the fold.

Dragonkin

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 9 XP: 6,400

LN Large dragon

Init.: +6 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +17

Defense

HP: 142 RP: 4

EAC: 25 KAC: 27

Fort: +14 Ref: +12 Will: +10

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., fly 120 ft. (Ex, average)

Melee: thunderhead dragonglaive +22 (2d8+15 S & E) or bite +22 (2d6+15 P)

Ranged: tactical magnetar rifle +18 (2d8+9 P)

Offensive Abilities: breath weapon (30-ft. cone, 9d6 F, Reflex DC 16 half, usable every 1d4 rounds), charge attack, fighting styles (blitz, guard)

Statistics

Str: +6 Dex: +2 Con: +5 Wis: +1 Int: +0 Cha: +3

Skills: Piloting +22, Intimidate +17, Acrobatics +17

Languages: Common, Draconic

Gear: advanced iridishell, tactical magnetar rifle with 50 longarm rounds, thunderhead dragonglaive with 1 battery (20 charges)

Ecology

Environment: any (Triaxus)

Organization: solitary, bonded pair (1 and 1 partner), patrol (3–6 bonded pairs), wing (7–14 bonded pairs)

Special Abilities

Partner Bond (Ex) A dragonkin can form a permanent bond with one willing non-dragonkin creature. Once this bond is made, a dragonkin cannot form another partner bond unless its current partner dies. A dragonkin and its partner can communicate with each other as if they both had telepathy with a range of 100 feet. In combat, when a dragonkin is within 30 feet of its partner, both creatures roll initiative checks separately and treat the higher result as the result for both of them.

Description

Native to Triaxus, dragonkin are smaller and more humanoid than their true dragon cousins, yet more intelligent than brutish drakes and wyverns. Even before the advent of the Gap, dragonkin had a long history of alliance with humanoids, specifically in a region on Triaxus called the Skyfire Mandate, where many dragonkin carried ryphorian riders into battle against the armies of the evil dragons in the Drakelands. With the formation of the Pact, however, the Drakelands’ masters ramped back their cruelty to ostensibly legal levels; these dragons eschewed their expansionist wars in favor of biased laws, secret police forces, and corporate oligarchies. In the wake of this peace and the dawn of easily accessible space travel, the Skyfire Mandate’s famed Dragon Legion was renamed the Skyfire Legion and found a new purpose as a spacefaring mercenary league that protects innocent colony worlds that are beyond the reach of the Pact’s laws. Yet not all dragonkin and their bonded partners signed up to join the legendary militia’s new crusade, and some instead took to the stars independently to find their own fortunes.

Probably the greatest distinguishing feature of the dragonkin is their near-magical ability to bond with a non-dragonkin partner, traditionally a ryphorian. Living and working together— and often training to complement each other in combat—a dragonkin and his partner can develop such a deep bond that they begin to literally read each other’s thoughts, allowing them to act with perfect synchronization. On Triaxus, this historically resulted in bonded pairs known as dragonrider pairs: a humanoid partner riding into combat on the dragonkin’s back and providing ranged and magical support. While there are still plenty of planet-dwelling pairs who practice this ancient form of combat, today, a dragonkin and his partner more often use their link to make an exceptional starship crew or ground assault squad. The bond between dragonkin and partner goes far beyond simple combat, however. While generally not romantically involved with each other, dragonkin and their partners act in sync in nearly every aspect of their lives and form an inseparable partnership that outside relationships must accommodate.

Life among the stars has led to variation within the dragonkin race, both culturally and genetically. While dragonkin adopted the use of armor, weapons, and other tools millennia ago, this reliance has accelerated dramatically in recent centuries. Dragonkin who remain on Triaxus and live according to tradition retain their abilities, yet those who make their homes in the cramped quarters of ships and space stations have a diminished ability to fly—a fact that drives a wedge between traditionalists and the newer breed, the latter of which claim that a good starship provides the only wings they need.

Dragonkin tend to be intimidatingly stoic to strangers but loyal and fun with their friends. While the Skyfire Legion has an unusually heroic code of ethics for a mercenary unit, dragonkin in general are no more good or evil than humans, finding their own religious or moral codes or simply doing whatever it takes to protect their friends and families. While legionaries don’t like to admit it, many dragonkin (and even their humanoid partners) are perfectly happy working for the chromatic-run corporations on Triaxus, conducting shady operations and making sure humanoids in the Drakelands remain properly cowed. Dragonkin have a particularly complicated relationship with the vesk, as the normally aggressive reptilian race have ancient religious scriptures claiming that the spirits of the Veskarium’s greatest warriors would be reincarnated elsewhere in a form suspiciously similar to the dragonkin, and thus vesk have always treated dragonkin with respect and deference, even when their two systems were at war.

The average terrestrial dragonkin is 15 to 20 feet long and weighs roughly 2,000 pounds, while the spacefaring variety can be as small as half that size.

Drow Enforcer

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 1 XP: 400

CE Medium humanoid (elf)

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 20

EAC: 16 KAC: 18

Fort: +3 Ref: +1 Will: +3, +2 vs. enchantment

Offense

Speed: 25 ft.

Melee: standard taclash +5 (1d4+2 S)

Ranged: azimuth laser rifle +8 (1d8+1 F; critical burn 1d6) or shock grenade I +8 (explode [15 ft., 1d8 E, DC 10])

Offensive Abilities: create darkness, fighting styles (arcane assailant), rune of the eldritch knight

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +4 Con: +1 Wis: +0 Int: -1 Cha: +1

Skills: Acrobatics +10, Intimidate +5, Stealth +5

Languages: Common, Drow

Gear: lashunta ringwear I, azimuth laser rifle with 4 batteries (20 charges each), shock grenades I (2), standard taclash

Ecology

Environment: any (Apostae)

Organization: pair, patrol (3–4), delegation (5–8 plus 1 drow noble arms dealer), or battalion (10–40)

Description

With purple skin and white hair, drow are physically beautiful but merciless. Common drow form the majority of civilian and military forces and are governed by more powerful drow nobles. This strictly matriarchal culture leaves few opportunities for a common male, and training as an enforcer for a noble house or arms dealer is one of only a few ways a drow male can secure a somewhat comfortable life—if not necessarily a long one.

Drow are ruthless opponents, having no qualms about setting ambushes or luring enemies to locations where they have the upper hand. They regard ideals such as fairness and honor as pathetic gestures of lesser races, and consider all who hold such beliefs deserving of exploitation. Drow have no compunction about using other races as slaves and minions, using them as cannon fodder when exploring potentially dangerous new locations or as a line of defense that allows drow to flee to safety when an encounter turns against them.

As their economy revolves primarily around retrieving, reverse engineering, and selling weaponry from the planet-ship they have claimed as their own, drow are known throughout the Pact Worlds for having some of the finest, most cutting-edge armaments available. Their soldiers specialize in the use of ranged weapons, favoring teamwork tactics to undermine their foes’ defenses—though even an otherwise loyal sniper wouldn’t hesitate to prioritize his personal vendetta and take advantage of a clear line of fire to a rival in the chaos of a firefight.

Some drow are born with gifts beyond those of most of their kind, including greater magical power. These individuals are referred to as drow nobles, and are most commonly born to other drow nobles within the powerful ruling houses through the aid of genetic-selection technology that is tightly controlled by those houses. However, it is not unheard of for a drow noble to be born to common parents without any genetic intervention. Such gifted progeny, upon realizing their talents, typically leverage them to gain a higher position in society, whether by aligning themselves with one of the powerful houses or striking out to earn a name for themselves. Given their exceptional talents, drow nobles quickly rise through the ranks and are soon recognized for their achievements even if a few common drow happen to disappear along their path to power.

A drow noble scion of a powerful arms-dealing house might lead a branch of the family arms dealership, traveling throughout the Pact Worlds and fledgling colonies to secure buyers for the advanced technology her house produces based on the relics plumbed from their world. Other scions reinforce their noble houses’ connections with their demon lord patrons, becoming powerful mystics, or train as technomancers with a goal of unraveling the mysteries of the portal-gate at the center of Nightarch (see pages 458–459 of the

).

Drow Noble Arms Dealer

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 11 XP: 12,800

CE Medium humanoid (elf)

Init.: +3 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +26

Defense

HP: 170 RP: 6

EAC: 26 KAC: 28

Fort: +10 Ref: +12 Will: +14, +2 vs. enchantments

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: ultrathin longsword +19 (4d8+12 S)

Ranged: LFD sonic pistol +21 (2d8+11 So; critical defense [DC 20])

Offensive Abilities: create darkness, limning light

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +3 Con: +1 Wis: +2 Int: +5 Cha: +8

Skills: Bluff +21, Diplomacy +26, Intimidate +26, Sense Motive +26, Stealth +21

Languages: Abyssal, Aklo, Common, Drow, Eoxian

Gear: kasatha microcord IV (electrostatic field mk 2, white force field [15 HP]), LFD sonic pistol with 2 super-capacity batteries (80 charges each), ultrathin longsword

Ecology

Environment: any (Apostae)

Organization: solitary, pair, or delegation (1 plus 5–8 drow enforcers)

Special Abilities

Limning Light (Su) As a standard action, a drow noble can cause all creatures and objects in a 5-foot-radius burst to shed a pale glow. Creatures outlined by the limning light take a –20 penalty to Stealth checks and don’t benefit from the concealment usually provided by darkness. If an affected creature is benefiting from an effect such as invisibility, all others within line of sight of it become aware of its location (see page 260 of the Starfinder Core Rulebook). This effect lasts for a number of minutes equal to the drow noble’s CR (11 minutes for a drow noble arms dealer). This ability has a range of 100 feet.

Description

With purple skin and white hair, drow are physically beautiful but merciless. Common drow form the majority of civilian and military forces and are governed by more powerful drow nobles. This strictly matriarchal culture leaves few opportunities for a common male, and training as an enforcer for a noble house or arms dealer is one of only a few ways a drow male can secure a somewhat comfortable life—if not necessarily a long one.

Drow are ruthless opponents, having no qualms about setting ambushes or luring enemies to locations where they have the upper hand. They regard ideals such as fairness and honor as pathetic gestures of lesser races, and consider all who hold such beliefs deserving of exploitation. Drow have no compunction about using other races as slaves and minions, using them as cannon fodder when exploring potentially dangerous new locations or as a line of defense that allows drow to flee to safety when an encounter turns against them.

As their economy revolves primarily around retrieving, reverse engineering, and selling weaponry from the planet-ship they have claimed as their own, drow are known throughout the Pact Worlds for having some of the finest, most cutting-edge armaments available. Their soldiers specialize in the use of ranged weapons, favoring teamwork tactics to undermine their foes’ defenses—though even an otherwise loyal sniper wouldn’t hesitate to prioritize his personal vendetta and take advantage of a clear line of fire to a rival in the chaos of a firefight.

Some drow are born with gifts beyond those of most of their kind, including greater magical power. These individuals are referred to as drow nobles, and are most commonly born to other drow nobles within the powerful ruling houses through the aid of genetic-selection technology that is tightly controlled by those houses. However, it is not unheard of for a drow noble to be born to common parents without any genetic intervention. Such gifted progeny, upon realizing their talents, typically leverage them to gain a higher position in society, whether by aligning themselves with one of the powerful houses or striking out to earn a name for themselves. Given their exceptional talents, drow nobles quickly rise through the ranks and are soon recognized for their achievements even if a few common drow happen to disappear along their path to power.

A drow noble scion of a powerful arms-dealing house might lead a branch of the family arms dealership, traveling throughout the Pact Worlds and fledgling colonies to secure buyers for the advanced technology her house produces based on the relics plumbed from their world. Other scions reinforce their noble houses’ connections with their demon lord patrons, becoming powerful mystics, or train as technomancers with a goal of unraveling the mysteries of the portal-gate at the center of Nightarch (see pages 458–459 of the

).

Elder Elemental

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 11 XP: 12,800

N Huge outsider (elemental)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +20

Defense

HP: 145

EAC: 24 KAC: 26

Fort: +15 Ref: +13 Will: +10

Offense

Speed: 20 ft.

Melee: slam +24 (4d6+11 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +8 Dex: +5 Con: +3 Wis: +0 Int: -3 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +20, Athletics +20

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: any

Description

An elemental is a creature native to one of the four Elemental Planes that is composed entirely of that plane’s element. They are usually encountered alone or in groups of 2 to 8. The statistics for an elemental can be generated using one of the stat blocks above plus one of the four following grafts.

Electrovore

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 2 XP: 600

N Small magical (beast)

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +12

Defense

HP: 23 RP: 3

EAC: 14 KAC: 14

Fort: +3 Ref: +7 Will: +1

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 30 ft. (Ex, average)

Melee: tail slap +9 (1d4+3 B; critical siphon)

Offensive Abilities: electrical discharge (1d6+2 E plus staggered, Reflex DC 13 half)

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +4 Con: +1 Wis: +2 Int: -4 Cha: -1

Skills: Acrobatics +7, Athletics +7, Stealth +12, Survival +12

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, nest (3–12), or colony (13+)

Special Abilities

Electrical Discharge (Ex) As a standard action, an electrovore can spend 1 Resolve Point to discharge some of its stored electrical energy as a powerful attack. All creatures within 10 feet of the electrovore take 1d6+2 electricity damage and are staggered for 1 round. A target can attempt a DC 13 Reflex save to take half this damage and negate the staggered effect.

Siphon (Ex) Whenever an electrovore scores a critical hit against a living creature, a construct with the technological subtype, or a technological piece of gear, it siphons off a portion of the target’s electrical energy. This restores 1 Resolve Point (up to its maximum of 3).

Description

Native to the wild planet of Verlorr, electrovores were on the verge of extinction as increased volcanic activity led to their swampy habitat’s disappearance, and along with it the three-headed electric eels that provided them sustenance. When explorers from the Pact Worlds first arrived on Verlorr 2 decades ago, however, electrovores were given a new lease on life, as the travelers came on massive metal vessels coursing with the very nourishment the beasts sought. A few crept on board the various ships, and since then, “conduit rats” (as some spacefarers refer to them) have quickly multiplied, forming colonies of varying sizes everywhere from Absalom Station to the farthest reaches of the Vast.

An electrovore gains sustenance not from ingesting biological material but from the electrical currents that pulse through both mechanical devices and organic creatures. Xenobiologists have shown evidence that an electrovore’s internal organs are unlike those of a normal animal—it has no stomach, no intestines, and no liver. Instead, every cell of the creature acts as a tiny battery, providing the necessary impulses to move its muscles and power brain functions. In essence, an electrovore is composed almost entirely of nervous system. The creatures have quickly adapted to the artificial habitats of starships and space stations that course with their nourishment.

With a serpentine body covered in sparking spines and sprouting a pair of leathery wings, a typical electrovore is 3 feet long and weighs 25 pounds. An electrovore has three bright-blue visual sensors: two flanking its head and one situated on the bridge of its snout. Its wide mouth is full of sharp teeth, but it rarely uses them in combat, instead employing them to chew through wire casings. An electrovore prefers to slap and sting with its barbed tail when on the hunt.

A single electrovore poses little immediate threat to a starship or space station, but two or more reproduce at an alarming rate and can quickly overrun even the most experienced and best-equipped engineering team. The first signs of an electrovore infestation are usually power fluctuations in a remote, rarely traveled portion of a ship or decks already under repair or construction, but such deviations can be the result of anything from cosmic rays to a loose coupling or power being diverted to other systems. A gnawed cable or severed connector is generally the next indication of an electrovore’s presence, but by then there are likely dozens and dozens of the creatures throughout the ship’s crawlways, in its walls, and beneath its floors out of sight.

In their new habitats, electrovores are incredibly fecund, doubling in number in 1d6+5 weeks (assuming there are two or more to begin with). If left unchecked, a handful of the creatures on a space station or large ship can eventually overwhelm the crew’s capacity to deal with them. As such, malicious space pirates and saboteurs sometimes release a pair of electrovores into a closed environment to disable their enemies’ vessels, distract from other threats or operations, or sink the economic or resale value of commercial operations or salvaged ships. However, the electrovores just as often disable the ships of these pirates and saboteurs, making this a risky and unreliable tactic.

In addition to the direct damage an electrovore colony can deal to a ship’s infrastructure, it can also wreak havoc on the vessel’s systems when threatened. Full of siphoned electrical energy, a startled or cornered electrovore discharges this stored potential, often resulting in even more damage to computer systems and organic matter than the creature could normally manage in twice the time. Luckily, it takes some time for an electrovore to gather enough energy to perform this devastating attack.

Larger starships generally have enough redundancies built into their construction that it takes much longer for electrovore infestations to disable their key systems, though a sizable enough colony of the creatures can unleash incredible destruction in a surprisingly short amount of time in the right conditions. Even a starship with one electrovore on it is in danger of eventually being incapacitated. For each period of time for each size of starship listed in the table below, one of the vessel’s systems (determined randomly) takes critical damage (Starfinder Core Rulebook 321). Of course, the more electrovores infesting a vessel, the faster they disable its systems, though it takes a minimum of 1 day for a starship to take a critical damage effect in this way.

Ellicoth

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 9 XP: 6,400

N Gargantuan magical (beast)

Init.: +0 Senses: blindsense (life) 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +22

Aura: of Radiation (Ex)

Defense

HP: 145

EAC: 22 KAC: 24

Fort: +13 Ref: +13 Will: +8

Offense

Speed: 50 ft.

Melee: gore +22 (2d10+15 P) or soul drain +22 (see below)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +6 Dex: +0 Con: +4 Wis: +3 Int: -3 Cha: +2

Skills: Athletics +17, Intimidate +17, Survival +17

Languages: Eoxian (can’t speak any language)

Ecology

Environment: any plains or deserts (Eox)

Organization: solitary, pair, or herd (3-6)

Special Abilities

Aura of Radiation (Ex) Due to the environments in which they live, ellicoths absorb extreme levels of radiation, and have evolved the ability to store and redirect this energy without being harmed by it. An ellicoth emanates medium radiation out to 15 feet and low radiation for an additional 15 feet.

Soul Drain (Su) As a standard action, an ellicoth can make an attack with its trunks against the KAC of a single living or undead target within its reach. If struck, the target takes 3d6+9 bludgeoning damage and is staggered for 1 round; the target can attempt a DC 16 Fortitude save to halve the damage and negate the staggered condition. If the target takes Hit Point damage, the ellicoth regains a number of Hit Points equal to that amount, up to its maximum.

Description

Standing 50 feet tall and weighing upward of 30 tons, an ellicoth resembles a strange two-trunked elephant perched on incongruously narrow, stilt-like legs. Its stocky body is covered with horns and growths, and its skin is heavily blistered and cracked from the radiation it absorbs and stores within itself, making it appear perpetually raw and burned. While some of this radiation comes from the cosmic rays that bombard Eox’s surface due to its lack of a protective atmosphere, even more of it is absorbed from Eox’s wastelands, as the creatures seem mysteriously drawn to those regions still heavily radioactive from the cataclysm that ravaged Eox ages ago.

Records from the bone sages report that ellicoths predate the nuclear disaster that befell Eox, indicating that at one point ellicoths were gentle herbivores whose long legs and lithe trunks allowed them to safely reach the luscious fruits atop tall spike-trunked jicobalan trees. During the disaster, however, several herds were caught in the backlash of magical energy, causing them to mutate. Today, the mournful ellicoths no longer eat vegetation or even breathe like normal animals. Instead, they siphon vital energy directly from other creatures and use it to sustain their own agonized existences. Ellicoths can survive just as easily on the necromantic energies that animate undead as on the soul energy of living creatures, and most of their diet consists of ghosts, zombies, and other spontaneously generated undead in Eox’s wastelands. Occasionally, however, a stampede of desperate or enraged ellicoths will crash through the protective walls around Eoxian settlements and gorge in a feeding frenzy until the local military can mobilize to bring them down. While the bone sages are thus careful to keep local ellicoth populations in check, driving the most aggressive populations out into the distant wastes, most see the advantage of keeping a few around to remind citizens that even the undead need the protection of a strong government.

Not all bone sages are content to let ellicoths remain wild, however. Continuing a tradition that stretches back even before the Gap, several bone sages still employ fearsome ellicoth cavalries in their militias. From armored howdahs built onto and around the horns atop the creatures’ broad backs, undead soldiers immune to ellicoths’ aura of radiation rain destruction down on their opponents, guiding the beasts through magic or direct neurotech linkages. Despite the expense of keeping the creatures and the advantages presented by more conventional vehicles, ellicoths’ ability to completely devour an opponent’s life force doubles as a useful psychological weapon, and their spindly legs can support a surprising amount of weight, allowing for thick armor plates to be affixed to their hide or heavy weapons to be mounted on their horns.

Ellicoths are mammalian and give birth to live young one at a time, which mature to full size within a few years and can live for centuries. Rather than having a designated leader, each herd tends to follow whichever adult member is moving with the most purpose at any given time, leading to chaotic and unpredictable movements when threatened. Ellicoth corpses are extremely rare; when an ellicoth grows old and its internal organs begin to fail, it instinctively leaves the herd and heads for the most powerful source of radiation in the area—usually the center of a radioactive waste—and proceeds to lie down and sing its dirges loudly and continually until its body finally gives out. Once it does, unknown processes within its cells, possibly related to the storage of radiation, cause the corpse to suddenly and dramatically break down, transforming the creature into a puddle of radioactive ooze within hours.

Endbringer Devil (Dhalochar)

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 19 XP: 204,800

LE Colossal outsider (devil)

Init.: +6 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., see in darkness Perception: +32

Defense

HP: 415 RP: 6

EAC: 33 KAC: 35

Fort: +20 Ref: +20 Will: +18

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 60 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: slam +32 (4d12+30 B)

Ranged: hellfire glare +34 (8d8+19 F; critical burn 5d6)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +11 Dex: +6 Con: +9 Wis: +6 Int: +4 Cha: +6

Skills: Computers +32, Engineering +32, Intimidate +37, Mysticism +32, Piloting +32

Languages: Celestial, Draconic, Infernal; telepathy 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any (Hell)

Organization: solitary, assault (1 dhalochar plus 8 other devils), or invasion (3-12)

Special Abilities

Cargo Cavity (Ex) A dhalochar has a sizable cavity within its body. This space can comfortably fit eight Large or smaller creatures (or four Huge creatures). Any creature inside is protected from the external environment, no matter how hostile, and can breathe as normal. A dhalochar has control over what enters and what leaves its cargo cavity. Entering or leaving a willing dhalochar requires a full action, during which the dhalochar cannot move. Creatures cannot enter an uncooperative dhalochar, but they can try to escape from inside as if they were attempting to escape being grappled.

Alternatively, some dhalochars have this cavity replaced with a device capable of generating minor passages to Hell. This grants them the ability to cast 6th-level planar binding as a spell-like ability once per hour (to a maximum number of times per day equal to the dhalochar’s Constitution modifier—nine times per day for most dhalochars), except they can call only devils. Called devils aren’t trapped by this ability, and they aren’t forced to do the dhalochar’s bidding, though they are usually friendly to the dhalochar.

Construct Form (Ex) Despite being true devils, dhalochars have a number of immunities common to constructs. They are immune to ability damage, ability drain, death effects, disease, energy drain, exhaustion, fatigue, necromancy effects, negative levels, nonlethal damage, paralysis, sleep, and stunning.

Hellfire Glare (Ex) As an attack, a dhalochar can shoot hellfire from its eyes at a single target. This attack has a range increment of 120 feet. The glare acts as if it had the unholy fusion.

Description

Eohi

Source: Starfinder #4: The Ruined Clouds

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

N Small animal

Init.: +2 Senses: blindsight (scent) 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +13

Defense

HP: 90

EAC: 18 KAC: 20

Fort: +10 Ref: +10 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: bite +16 (1d8+11 P) or slam +16 (1d8+11 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +2 Con: +3 Wis: +1 Int: -4 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +13, Acrobatics +13, Survival +18

Ecology

Environment: any forests (Nejeor IV)

Organization: solitary, pair, or pack (3-8)

Special Abilities

Pounce (Ex) As a full action, an eohi can move up to its speed and make a full attack at the end of its movement. Each attack takes a –5 penalty instead of the usual –4 penalty.

Description

Originally from the heavily forested world of Nejeor IV, carnivorous eohis prefer to hunt in packs, often climbing to precarious heights in the treetops, where they can leap quickly from branch to branch, easily chasing down prey that is slowed by underbrush. Another favored hunting tactic is to drop down in a ring around an unsuspecting victim before closing in for the kill.

These furred quadrupeds are the size of large hounds, with muscular forelimbs and six-digit humanlike hands that assist in scaling trunks and hanging onto branches. Their powerful jaws and sharp teeth are capable of tearing into tough flesh, and their large, flaring nostrils help them pick up even the faintest scent. But eohis are not entirely dependent on scent; their keen eyes allow them to see well even in the dim light under the forest canopy.

Male eohis have darker fur, ranging from black to slate gray, while female eohis are usually light brown, tan, or brindled. Eohis give birth to live young, which are nursed by their mothers until their fangs grow in, usually in about 3 months. The young then feast on carcasses left behind by older eohis, but as they grow and learn to work cooperatively to take down living prey, they form their own hunting packs.

Millennia ago, the kishalee empire captured a handful of eohis and brought them to the cities of Nejeor VI (see page 62) to populate their zoos. The kishalee occasionally introduced new eohis to the captive animals to keep the gene pool viable, and the creatures became a popular attraction. When the kishalee civilization crumbled, though, these captive eohis were left to fend for themselves in their pens. Many of them died from lack of food; others perished when their host cities plummeted into the clouds. However, the eohis in Istamak (see page 38) survived by breaking out of their cages and eating many of the other animals in their zoo before eventually establishing a stable population in the city’s park. Eventually, the kish (see page 58) in that city saw how useful eohis could be in a hunt and tamed some of them, training them to take down larger prey and to guard kish homes and livestock from the city’s other predators.

Formian Warrior

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 3 XP: 800

LN Medium monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +2 (+6 with hive mind) Senses: blindsense (scent) 30 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +8 (+12 with hive mind)

Defense

HP: 39

EAC: 17 KAC: 20

Fort: +5 Ref: +3 Will: +4

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: claw +11 (1d6+7 S) or stinger +11 (1d4+7 P plus formian toxin)

Ranged: azimuth laser rifle +8 (1d8+3 F; critical burn 1d6)

Offensive Abilities: deadly grasp, fighting styles (guard)

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +2 Con: +1 Wis: -1 Int: +0 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +13, Intimidate +8, Stealth +8

Languages: Common; limited telepathy 60 ft.

Gear: squad defiance series, azimuth laser rifle with 2 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any land or underground (Castrovel)

Organization: solitary, pair, patrol (3–12), or band (5–8 plus 3–15 formian workers)

Special Abilities

Deadly Grasp (Ex) When a formian warrior succeeds at a combat maneuver to maintain a grapple, it can make a melee attack with its stinger as a move action.

Hive Mind (Ex) Formians operate from a shared hive intelligence that allows them to communicate nearly instantaneously. While within telepathic range of at least one other formian with this ability, a formian gains a +4 bonus to initiative and Perception checks. If one formian is aware of a combatant, all members of the hive mind within range are aware of it, and a member of the hive mind cannot be surprised unless all members within range are surprised. If one member of the hive mind succeeds at a Will save to disbelieve an illusion effect, all members of that hive mind within telepathic range also disbelieve the effect.

Formian Toxin

Type poison (injury)
Save Fortitude DC 12; Track Dexterity
Frequency 1/round for 6 rounds; Cure 1 save

Description

Formians resemble giant ants with humanoid upper bodies, and carve their chitinous plates with insignias reflecting their individual names and achievements. Members of a hive all share a telepathic link, allowing them to coordinate efficiently.

Within a hive are castes specialized to particular tasks. The queen leads the hive and is its sole means of propagation, while castes like the aristocratic myrmarchs and mercantile taskmasters direct lower castes like warriors and workers.

Formians are most common on Castrovel. For millennia they sought to eradicate the lashunta, their traditional foes, but their queens now instead focus on adopting other species’ technology to industrialize their traditional hive societies.

Formian Worker

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 1 XP: 200

LN Small monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +2 (+6 with hive mind) Senses: blindsense (scent) 30 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +4 (+8 with hive mind)

Defense

HP: 12

EAC: 10 KAC: 11

Fort: +2 Ref: +2 Will: +2

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., burrow 10 ft.

Melee: bite +5 (1d4+3 P)

Ranged: survival flare gun +3 (1d3 F; critical burn 1d6)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +3 Dex: +2 Con: +1 Wis: +0 Int: +0 Cha: -1

Skills: Athletics +9, Engineering +9, Physical Science +4, Profession (miner) +9, Survival +4

Languages: Common; limited telepathy 60 ft.

Gear: survival flare gun with 10 flares

Ecology

Environment: any land or underground (Castrovel)

Organization: solitary, work crew (6–12), or band (3–15 plus 5–8 formian warriors)

Special Abilities

Able Assistant (Ex) When supporting an ally within range of its limited telepathy through covering fire, harrying fire, or the aid another action, a formian worker provides a +4 bonus to its ally’s AC, attack roll, or skill check instead of the normal +2 bonus.

Hive Mind (Ex) Formians operate from a shared hive intelligence that allows them to communicate nearly instantaneously. While within telepathic range of at least one other formian with this ability, a formian gains a +4 bonus to initiative and Perception checks. If one formian is aware of a combatant, all members of the hive mind within range are aware of it, and a member of the hive mind cannot be surprised unless all members within range are surprised. If one member of the hive mind succeeds at a Will save to disbelieve an illusion effect, all members of that hive mind within telepathic range also disbelieve the effect.

Peerless Bearer (Ex) Formian workers are bred for heavy labor. A formian worker can carry 5 additional bulk beyond the normal limits for its Strength before becoming encumbered or overburdened.

Description

Formians resemble giant ants with humanoid upper bodies, and carve their chitinous plates with insignias reflecting their individual names and achievements. Members of a hive all share a telepathic link, allowing them to coordinate efficiently.

Within a hive are castes specialized to particular tasks. The queen leads the hive and is its sole means of propagation, while castes like the aristocratic myrmarchs and mercantile taskmasters direct lower castes like warriors and workers.

Formians are most common on Castrovel. For millennia they sought to eradicate the lashunta, their traditional foes, but their queens now instead focus on adopting other species’ technology to industrialize their traditional hive societies.

Frujai Colony

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 19 XP: 204,800

N Colossal plant

Init.: +0 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +32

Defense

HP: 420 RP: 6

EAC: 31 KAC: 33

Fort: +22 Ref: +15 Will: +20

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: bite +33 (6d10+29 P) or slam +33 (4d12+29 B)

Ranged: gravity thrust +30 (8d8+19 force)

Offensive Abilities: gravity control, slough minion

Statistics

Str: +10 Dex: +0 Con: +9 Wis: +4 Int: +2 Cha: +9

Skills: Intimidate +37, Life Science +32, Survival +32

Languages: Frujai; telepathy 300 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any forests (Orikolai)

Organization: solitary or communion (2–5)

Special Abilities

Absolute Gravity (Su) A frujai colony is able to control its apparent mass through a combination of organelles and psychic commands. It gains a +4 bonus to its KAC against bull rush, reposition, and trip combat maneuvers. Furthermore, it can ignore the effect of supernatural gravity effects such as control gravity and can always behave as though natural gravity conditions were up to two steps stronger or weaker.

Gravity Control (Su) A frujai colony can control gravity in a variety of ways. At the beginning of its turn, a colony selects two of the following five abilities that it can use before the beginning of its next turn. By spending 1 Resolve Point, a colony can select three of the abilities that round instead. If a colony has a sustained ability active (such as flight or gravity field) and does not select that as one of its abilities for the turn, that effect ends immediately.

Flight: As a free action, the frujai colony gains an extraordinary fly speed of 40 feet (poor maneuverability). When this ability ends, the colony descends gently at a rate of 60 feet per round and takes no damage when it lands.

Gravity Field: The frujai colony can create a zone of abnormal gravity as a standard action, as per control gravity (CL 19th). A colony can maintain only one such effect at a time, and the abnormal gravity field ends if it uses this ability again.

Gravity Shield: The frujai colony combines levitating improvised shields with pulses of gravity to deflect attacks, gaining a +4 bonus to its AC.

Gravity Thrust: The frujai colony can use its gravity thrust attack. This is a ranged attack against EAC with a maximum range of 200 feet and no range increment.

Gravity Wave: As a standard action, the frujai colony can unleash a wave of force in a 60-foot cone that deals 8d6+17 bludgeoning damage to each creature in the area and pushes affected creatures 10 feet away from the colony. A target can attempt a DC 24 Reflex save to halve the damage and negate the movement.

Slough Minion (Ex)

Description

On the toroid-shaped world of Orikolai, dramatic fluctuations of gravity, light, and temperature are commonplace. Sentient fungi known as frujais are among the most successful of the planet’s inhabitants, having developed not only a seasonal life cycle but also biological and psychic means of overcoming different gravity levels. Frujais function much like ants, with the colony’s living hub spawning hundreds of simple workers and soldiers to sustain it. During Orikolai’s frigid winters, frujais hibernate, awakening at the first signs of spring to blanket their territory in spores that take root in the thawing corpses of any animals that didn’t survive the cold. If not enough corpses are available, the colony begins to hunt aggressively, attacking whatever living organisms it comes across.

The immature drones that sprout from these infested cadavers (use the statistics for a frujai soldier above, without the colony guard ability) wander through unclaimed territory, scavenging and hunting to grow strong. In early autumn, the drones convene and mate in roiling ligneous mats, during which they spar with and even consume one another. Those that survive the process disperse to pursue migratory herds or shadow large prey back to the latters’ winter lairs, eating and killing as much as possible in order to stockpile as much nutrition as they can. They then consume these stores over the winter months, growing to their colossal mature size and metamorphosing into fully functional frujai colonies. Both colonies and the individual soldiers they spawn as guardians use their mastery of gravity to collect stones and other objects, which constantly orbit them and represent their only concessions to wealth or vanity.

Despite their strange shapes, frujai colonies and soldiers are surprisingly intelligent. Frujais see themselves as ecological caretakers, weeding out the weak and clearing the path for stronger creatures. Several attempts at settling Orikolai have failed when frujais interpreted the settlements as well-stocked larders of weak-willed flesh. Larger frujai colonies sometimes entertain interviews with avid xenobiologists, though the dialogues are as likely to descend into ravenous feasting upon the scholars as they are to explore the deep philosophical musings that occupy the frujais the rest of the time.

Frujai Soldier

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 12 XP: 19,200

N Large plant

Init.: +2 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +22

Defense

HP: 210

EAC: 26 KAC: 28

Fort: +16 Ref: +14 Will: +11

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: slam +25 (6d4+20 B)

Ranged: gravity anchor +22 (6d4+12 force plus reposition or trip)

Offensive Abilities: colony guard

Statistics

Str: +8 Dex: +2 Con: +5 Wis: +2 Int: -1 Cha: +2

Skills: Intimidate +27, Stealth +22, Survival +22

Languages: Frujai; telepathy 100 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any forests (Orikolai)

Organization: solitary or squad (2–8)

Special Abilities

Absolute Gravity (Su) A frujai soldier is able to control its apparent mass through a combination of organelles and psychic commands. It gains a +4 bonus to its KAC against bull rush, reposition, and trip combat maneuvers. Furthermore, it can ignore the effect of supernatural gravity effects such as control gravity and can always behave as though natural gravity conditions were up to two steps stronger or weaker.

Colony Guard (Ex) Whenever a frujai colony takes damage, all frujai soldiers within 300 feet gain a +4 morale bonus to attack rolls and a 10-foot bonus to their base speed for 1 round.

Gravity Anchor (Su)

Description

On the toroid-shaped world of Orikolai, dramatic fluctuations of gravity, light, and temperature are commonplace. Sentient fungi known as frujais are among the most successful of the planet’s inhabitants, having developed not only a seasonal life cycle but also biological and psychic means of overcoming different gravity levels. Frujais function much like ants, with the colony’s living hub spawning hundreds of simple workers and soldiers to sustain it. During Orikolai’s frigid winters, frujais hibernate, awakening at the first signs of spring to blanket their territory in spores that take root in the thawing corpses of any animals that didn’t survive the cold. If not enough corpses are available, the colony begins to hunt aggressively, attacking whatever living organisms it comes across.

The immature drones that sprout from these infested cadavers (use the statistics for a frujai soldier above, without the colony guard ability) wander through unclaimed territory, scavenging and hunting to grow strong. In early autumn, the drones convene and mate in roiling ligneous mats, during which they spar with and even consume one another. Those that survive the process disperse to pursue migratory herds or shadow large prey back to the latters’ winter lairs, eating and killing as much as possible in order to stockpile as much nutrition as they can. They then consume these stores over the winter months, growing to their colossal mature size and metamorphosing into fully functional frujai colonies. Both colonies and the individual soldiers they spawn as guardians use their mastery of gravity to collect stones and other objects, which constantly orbit them and represent their only concessions to wealth or vanity.

Despite their strange shapes, frujai colonies and soldiers are surprisingly intelligent. Frujais see themselves as ecological caretakers, weeding out the weak and clearing the path for stronger creatures. Several attempts at settling Orikolai have failed when frujais interpreted the settlements as well-stocked larders of weak-willed flesh. Larger frujai colonies sometimes entertain interviews with avid xenobiologists, though the dialogues are as likely to descend into ravenous feasting upon the scholars as they are to explore the deep philosophical musings that occupy the frujais the rest of the time.

Gray

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 4 XP: 1,200

NE Small humanoid (gray)

Init.: +1 Senses: darkvision 30 ft. Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 43

EAC: 15 KAC: 15

Fort: +3 Ref: +3 Will: +9

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: touch +6 (probe)

Ranged: needler pistol +8 (1d4+4 P plus blue whinnis)

Offensive Abilities: sleep paralysis

Statistics

Str: -1 Dex: +1 Con: +0 Wis: +0 Int: +5 Cha: +3

Skills: Life Science +15, Medicine +10, Sense Motive +15

Languages: Aklo (can’t speak); telepathy 100 ft.

Gear: gray skinsuit (functions as basic lashunta tempweave), needler pistol with 25 darts, 5 doses of blue whinnis

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or invasion (6–12)

Special Abilities

Phase (Su) Grays exist slightly out of phase with the Material Plane. A gray can pass through walls or material objects (but not corporeal creatures) as long as it begins and ends its turn outside of any wall or obstacle. In addition, a gray always benefits from a 20% miss chance against attacks and effects targeting it directly and takes only half damage from area effects. Force effects, however, function normally against a gray.

Probe (Su) A gray creates powerful psychic connections to creatures it touches, transferring information and sensations at terrifying speeds. A creature struck by a gray’s touch (a melee attack targeting KAC) is staggered by sensory overload for 1d4 rounds unless it succeeds at a DC 15 Will save.

Alternatively, if the creature it touches is conscious, intelligent, and paralyzed, a gray can instead use a standard action to probe the creature’s mind. It can search for the answer to a simple question (such as, “What is your starship’s point of origin?”) or seek information on one general topic known to the subject. The target can resist this probing with a successful DC 15 Will save. The gray can probe a single creature in this way only once per minute, but if it remains in contact with the subject for at least 1 minute, it can choose one Intelligence-based skill the subject has at least 1 rank in and attempt checks using the subject’s skill modifier instead of its own for the next 24 hours.

A gray can’t employ this ability in both ways simultaneously, and using this ability to overload a target’s senses interrupts its efforts to probe for information.

Sleep Paralysis (Su) As a standard action, a gray can paralyze a sleeping creature within 30 feet that it can see. A target that succeeds at a DC 15 Will save remains asleep and is immune to the same gray’s sleep paralysis ability for 24 hours. A creature that fails the save awakens but is paralyzed for 1d6 minutes. Any attack or hostile action other than a gray’s ability to probe for information ends this paralysis. If the paralysis is not interrupted and its duration ends, the victim falls back asleep and has no memory of the event, as if its memory were eliminated by modify memory. The victim can attempt a DC 15 Will save against the memory erasure; if it succeeds, it remembers the paralysis and probing but with imperfect clarity.

Description

No one knows what planet or even galaxy the grays call home, but reports of their unnerving abductions, nightmarish paralysis, and mysterious experiments have been collected from countless worlds for as long as starships have sailed in the dark spaces of the universe. Such reports are fragmentary and unreliable, offered by victims recounting hazy memories of enduring various procedures under clinically bright lights or waking in cramped and lightless confinement, and do little to explain the methodology or goals of their captors. Those captors, though, have much in common no matter the specific circumstances or the species of the victim: an otherworldly presence, condescending interactions, and a sinister disregard for the agency and dignity of those they take as subjects for their experiments.

Grays communicate only telepathically, even among their own kind. Their faces and glassy black eyes show little emotion or reaction, and while graceful, they usually move with deliberate intention, often spending several moments in thought before committing to an action or movement. This inscrutability renders them enigmatic and disturbing to most other races.

Little is known about the grays’ motivations, and to date no efforts have been successful at establishing diplomatic relationships with them. However, their goals appear to center around the search for information, rather than conquest. Victims of their paralytic abductions are almost always returned mostly unharmed, though the sudden appearance of a series of scars or an inexplicable implant undermines the effects of the grays’ ability to erase memories of the experience. Researchers wonder at the end goals of this accumulation of knowledge and what purposes the information gleaned may serve in the meantime. Some fringe scientists believe grays are preparing for an eventual all-out invasion, while others posit they are simply curious about us, but their alien mindsets lead them to sate this inquisitiveness in disturbing ways.

Once rare enough that reports of their abductions were written off as conspiracy and delusion, encounters with grays have become disturbingly more common with the advent of Drift travel. Their sleek, disk-shaped starships lurk in the dark corners of the Drift, appearing seemingly out of nowhere to confront vessels with inattentive or unwary crews. Much like the grays themselves, their ships are designed less for offense and more for evading and subduing their targets, employing tractor beams and EMP weapons to disable and control a vessel, preserving its crew as test subjects. Such captives find themselves unable to move, held under brilliant lights, their captors mere silhouettes as their thoughts and memories are sifted under the gray’s psychic touch.

Greater Elemental

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 9 XP: 6,400

N Huge outsider (elemental)

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +17

Defense

HP: 145

EAC: 22 KAC: 24

Fort: +13 Ref: +11 Will: +8

Offense

Speed: 20 ft.

Melee: slam +22 (2d10+15 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +6 Dex: +4 Con: +3 Wis: +0 Int: -3 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +17, Athletics +17

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: any

Description

An elemental is a creature native to one of the four Elemental Planes that is composed entirely of that plane’s element. They are usually encountered alone or in groups of 2 to 8. The statistics for an elemental can be generated using one of the stat blocks above plus one of the four following grafts.

Haan Combat Pilot

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

CN Large monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +15

Defense

HP: 102

EAC: 20 KAC: 21

Fort: +6 Ref: +9 Will: +10

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., climb 40 ft., fly 30 ft. (Ex, average), swim 40 ft., sure-footed

Melee: balloon +12 (see below) or tactical knife +12 (2d4+9 S)

Ranged: advanced semi-auto pistol +14 (2d6+7 P)

Offensive Abilities: firespray, debilitating trick, trick attack +4d8

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +5 Con: +0 Wis: +4 Int: +1 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +20, Engineering +15, Piloting +20, Profession (soldier) +15, Stealth +20

Languages: Brethedan, Common

Gear: D-suit I, advanced semi-auto pistol with 60 small arm rounds, tactical knife

Ecology

Environment: any sky (Bretheda)

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Balloon (Ex) A haan can create and inflate a web balloon and attach it to an adjacent enemy with a successful melee attack against KAC. If the attack hits, the target immediately rises 30 feet off the ground in a straight line, and it continues to rise at a speed of 30 feet each round on the haan’s turn. Every round after the balloon is attached, the target can attempt a DC 14 Reflex save to cut or break free of the web balloon. If freeing itself from the balloon causes the creature to fall, it takes falling damage as normal. This ability does not function in a vacuum or zero gravity.

Firespray (Ex) As a standard action, a haan can spray its flammable lifting gases and light them with sparks, creating a 30-foot cone of flame. All creatures within the cone take 3d6 fire damage (Reflex DC 14 half).

Description

The slender arthropodan haans are native to Bretheda, where they soar through the endless skies in search of prey. Haans fly not via wings but by deftly weaving their silken webbing into balloons, which they then inflate with buoyant gases expelled from tubes in their shells. Combining this upward lift with web sails and occasional blasts from their gas tubes, haans are able to ride the winds of their home world with terrifying speed and precision, often bobbing along just at the leading edge of a storm front. Once they locate prey, haans ignite their jets of flammable gas using sparks from specially evolved strike plates in their leg chitin, creating biological flamethrowers. The roasted prey is then quickly caught and secured to a balloon of its own before it can fall away into the planet’s depths.

Though haans are intelligent, their society is highly traditional and forbids all but the simplest tools. Those rare haans who leave their kin to travel the stars often become starship and aircraft pilots, finding that their experience in flying organically on Bretheda gives them a natural aptitude for the physics involved. Sadly, these individuals are inevitably mourned as dead by their families and never allowed to return home—a fact that leads many haan starfarers to join up with crime families, megacorporations, military organizations, adventuring groups such as the Starfinder Society, or an other social organizations that promise a senses of belonging. Of late, a group of haan expatriates have begun making plans for a technology-friendly haan colony on a gas giant in Near Space, which they’ve named Haanara. Without the need for ordinary humanoid gas-mining platforms, they hope to create a highly lucrative refuge for haan workers tired of being held back by tradition, though many fear that attempts to actively recruit on Bretheda will lead to ugly sectarian violence.

The average haan is 8 feet long and weighs 180 pounds. Their chitin tends toward a pinkish purple, and they have barbed limbs and spiky pedipalps, which stretch wide on either side of their faces. Though the mottled colors on their shells can be quite beautiful, haan vanity is focused almost exclusively on the large, hairlike spikes extending from the tips of their abdomen. Haans never cover these unless they absolutely have to, and they frequently carve, cut, and decorate them with the same care humans reserve for head hair. Indeed, even traditionalist haans on Bretheda often sneak onto mining settlements in search of offworlder barbers and other artisans offering “file and style” services to help them establish unique and identifiable looks.

Haan

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 3 XP: 800

CN Large monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +13

Defense

HP: 36

EAC: 14 KAC: 15

Fort: +2 Ref: +4 Will: +8

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 30 ft. (Ex, average)

Melee: balloon +10 (see below) or claw +10 (1d4+5 S)

Offensive Abilities: firespray

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +4 Con: +0 Wis: +1 Int: -1 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +13, Engineering +8, Piloting +13, Stealth +8

Languages: Brethedan, Common

Ecology

Environment: any sky (Bretheda)

Organization: solitary, pair, or flotilla (3–10)

Special Abilities

Balloon (Ex) A haan can create and inflate a web balloon and attach it to an adjacent enemy with a successful melee attack against KAC. If the attack hits, the target immediately rises 30 feet off the ground in a straight line, and it continues to rise at a speed of 30 feet each round on the haan’s turn. Every round after the balloon is attached, the target can attempt a DC 14 Reflex save to cut or break free of the web balloon. If freeing itself from the balloon causes the creature to fall, it takes falling damage as normal. This ability does not function in a vacuum or zero gravity.

Firespray (Ex) As a standard action, a haan can spray its flammable lifting gases and light them with sparks, creating a 30-foot cone of flame. All creatures within the cone take 3d6 fire damage (Reflex DC 14 half).

Description

The slender arthropodan haans are native to Bretheda, where they soar through the endless skies in search of prey. Haans fly not via wings but by deftly weaving their silken webbing into balloons, which they then inflate with buoyant gases expelled from tubes in their shells. Combining this upward lift with web sails and occasional blasts from their gas tubes, haans are able to ride the winds of their home world with terrifying speed and precision, often bobbing along just at the leading edge of a storm front. Once they locate prey, haans ignite their jets of flammable gas using sparks from specially evolved strike plates in their leg chitin, creating biological flamethrowers. The roasted prey is then quickly caught and secured to a balloon of its own before it can fall away into the planet’s depths.

Though haans are intelligent, their society is highly traditional and forbids all but the simplest tools. Those rare haans who leave their kin to travel the stars often become starship and aircraft pilots, finding that their experience in flying organically on Bretheda gives them a natural aptitude for the physics involved. Sadly, these individuals are inevitably mourned as dead by their families and never allowed to return home—a fact that leads many haan starfarers to join up with crime families, megacorporations, military organizations, adventuring groups such as the Starfinder Society, or an other social organizations that promise a senses of belonging. Of late, a group of haan expatriates have begun making plans for a technology-friendly haan colony on a gas giant in Near Space, which they’ve named Haanara. Without the need for ordinary humanoid gas-mining platforms, they hope to create a highly lucrative refuge for haan workers tired of being held back by tradition, though many fear that attempts to actively recruit on Bretheda will lead to ugly sectarian violence.

The average haan is 8 feet long and weighs 180 pounds. Their chitin tends toward a pinkish purple, and they have barbed limbs and spiky pedipalps, which stretch wide on either side of their faces. Though the mottled colors on their shells can be quite beautiful, haan vanity is focused almost exclusively on the large, hairlike spikes extending from the tips of their abdomen. Haans never cover these unless they absolutely have to, and they frequently carve, cut, and decorate them with the same care humans reserve for head hair. Indeed, even traditionalist haans on Bretheda often sneak onto mining settlements in search of offworlder barbers and other artisans offering “file and style” services to help them establish unique and identifiable looks.

Hallajin

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 17 XP: 102,400

CN Large aberration

Init.: +5 Senses: blindsight (thought) 120 ft., darkvision 60 ft., sense through (thought) Perception: +29

Defense

HP: 280

EAC: 31 KAC: 30

Fort: +15 Ref: +15 Will: +22

Offense

Speed: fly 120 ft. (Ex, perfect)

Melee: energy surge +25 (8d6+17 F)

Ranged: energy surge +27 (4d8+17 F)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str:Dex: +5 Con: +8 Wis: +8 Int: +11 Cha: +5

Skills: Culture +34, Mysticism +34

Languages: Hallas, telepathy 120 ft. and telepathy (anywhere on same plane, other hallajins only)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Advanced Immunities (Ex) Hallajins are immune to bleed, disease, mind-affecting effects, paralysis, poison, sleep, and stunning. They are also immune to ability damage, ability drain, exhaustion, fatigue, negative levels, and nonlethal damage.

Energy Surge (Ex) A hallajin can concentrate its glowing form into deadly flaming energy to make either melee or ranged attacks. Its ranged energy surge attack has a range increment of 100 feet.

Light Leap (Su) As a full action, a hallajin can teleport (as per teleport), except it can’t leave or enter an area enclosed by barriers of electrical energy.

Searing Mind (Ex) The mind and spirit of a hallajin is so convoluted and energetic that direct contact with it via abilities like detect thoughts, mind link, or other spells or abilities that charm or dominate causes feedback of psychic energy. The creature contacting the hallajin’s mind takes 4d8+8 psychic damage (Will DC 24 half). This damage occurs each round a creature remains in contact with the hallajin’s mind. A hallajin using its telepathy on a creature doesn’t affect it in this way.

Shining Form (Ex) A hallajin sheds light as per a beacon.

Description

Spacefaring legends from ancient times describe the “lights of Hallas,” strange glowing forms seen on the moon Hallas beneath the stormy shadow of Liavara the Dreamer. Most of the time, these shapes look like shifting multicolored masses of light, though sometimes hints of feathery wings, scaly coils, staring eyes, or writhing tendrils emerge from within their depths. These forms were initially believed to be just strange lights seen in the sky of Hallas, perhaps an aurora or a type of ball lightning related to the storms of Liavara, but visitors to the moon quickly learned they were intelligent—if inscrutable—creatures, though that knowledge came at a high price. The creatures are able to communicate telepathically, but when the first emissaries from nearby Arkanen attempted to contact them in the same manner, the experience seared the emissaries’ minds. This led to the establishment of a powerful magical cordon around the world—one that remains in place to this day, now administrated by Pact Worlds officials on nearby Arkanen to ensure unprepared visitors don’t accidentally destroy their minds or anger the powerful entities.

Study of ancient ruins and artifacts on Hallas by modern archaeological and paleobiological teams has contributed to the belief that the so-called hallajins (their name for themselves is unknown) once had material forms but developed beyond the need for them and became beings of pure energy. Examination of the surviving art and artifacts on Hallas suggests hallajins considered their small world the center of the universe, with other worlds and stars revolving around it, and saw the idea of leaving it as heresy. This may explain why hallajins are rarely seen away from Hallas. Though actual answers are few, historians believe that those occasional hallajins sighted on other worlds may be descendants of an ancient schism in their society that happened before the Gap or the establishment of the protective cordon.

Hallajins can use their light leap ability to appear and vanish at will, fly swiftly, pass through material barriers, and cross vast distances in the blink of an eye. Early adepts of Arkanen discovered that hallajins either will not or cannot pass through intense electrical fields, and they found that electricity appears to cause hallajins pain— or at least that they recoil from it. Researchers theorize that electricity interferes in some way with the creatures’ energy matrices. This weakness provides a means of shielding against hallajin intrusions, although intense electrical energy fields also appear to draw the creatures’ attention, perhaps being especially visible to their senses. Large concentrations of minds, particularly emotional ones, seem to likewise draw the creatures, and researchers must keep their minds carefully shielded with specialized armor or magical protections.

What hallajins want, if anything, is unclear. The little of their culture recovered from ancient ruins and brief interactions indicates that their advancement to their current form was part of an intentional cultural drive to attempt to reach collective godhood. Whether the creatures intentionally stopped at their current state or simply couldn’t progress any further remains unknown. Today, hallajins appear capricious and intensely curious, and their behavior is unpredictable. They are almost always encountered singly, although small groups of them have been sighted in the distance on Hallas. Yet despite their apparently solitary behavior, they remain in near-constant communication with others of their kind across vast distances. They don’t appear to understand or respond to any known spoken languages, and attempts to contact them telepathically usually end in disaster. The hallajins sometimes initiate contact, telepathically “speaking” in an unsettling chorus of voices to their listeners, but rarely say anything intelligible. Hallajins occasionally follow visitors to their home planets, exercising their telekinetic abilities to shift objects around or cause random poltergeistlike phenomena, sometimes dangerously. In a few cases, the energy beings turn suddenly hostile, attacking with bursts of searing energy or overloading victims’ minds. Interestingly, hallajins appear incapable of recognizing mechanical constructs as anything but objects, even if such creatures are intelligent.

The unexplained behavior, strange powers, and eerie appearance of hallajins lead some intelligent creatures to revere them as examples of universal forces or enlightened beings. A few visiting scholars have started single-minded cults around the creatures, believing that hallajins hold the secrets to assisting corporeal beings in attaining a similarly evolved state, if only they can be persuaded to share them. Some think this is accomplished by attracting the attention of the lights of Hallas, and then communing and proving their worthiness in some fashion, while others think they can trick or even force the secret from hallajins. Hallajin cults tend to be obsessed with ancient artifacts from Hallas and strange electrical mechanisms designed to summon, communicate with, or even trap the objects of their worship. Though many fear the consequences of allowing such groups contact with the creatures, so far the Pact Worlds overseers have continued to grant these fanatics unrestricted access to Hallas.

Hesper

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 2 XP: 600

CN Medium fey

Init.: +1 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +7

Defense

HP: 21

EAC: 13 KAC: 12

Fort: +3 Ref: +3 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: mutating touch +3 (see below)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +1 Con: +2 Wis: +1 Int: +0 Cha: +4

Skills: Diplomacy +12, Engineering +7, Physical Science +12

Languages: Common

Ecology

Environment: any starship or urban

Organization: solitary, pair, or clique (3–12)

Special Abilities

Mutating Touch (Su) A hesper can deliver an enormous dose of radiation with a touch, triggering sudden mutations and pain in living creatures. With a successful attack against a living creature’s KAC, a hesper causes the target to sprout tumors that erupt at the beginning of its next turn, causing a random mutation (roll 1d20 on the table below) that persists for 24 hours. An affected creature can negate this transformation with a successful DC 13 Fortitude saving throw. Once a creature has been affected by a hesper’s mutating touch, it becomes immune to that particular fey’s mutating touch for 24 hours.

Reactor Sprite (Su) If a hesper spends 1 hour in close contact with a starship’s power core or another large power source (such as a fusion reactor), it can form a long-term bond. A hesper can merge with its bonded reactor, gaining fast healing 5 while it remains merged. A merged hesper is aware of what happens in the reactor’s immediate vicinity, but if the reactor is broken or suffers the wrecked critical damage condition, the hesper is immediately expelled and takes 3d6 damage. If the reactor is destroyed while the hesper is merged with it, the hesper is slain instantly (Fortitude DC 15 negates). A hesper can bond with only one reactor at a time, and forming a new bond severs its previous bond.

Description

Lithe and handsome, hespers embody the potential for change inherent in technological power sources. They are energetic and excitable, interested in new faces, sights, and sensations, which drives them to spread across the universe. However, hespers are invested in change for change’s sake. Though rarely malicious, they worm their way into any repository of advanced technology, rebuilding devices and asking endless questions. Most line their nests with all sorts of souvenirs— most of them stolen—which they occasionally rebuild into bizarre and sometimes radioactive totems.

Hespers stand 4 to 5 feet tall but are deceptively dense, weighing 300 to 400 pounds despite their slim, generally masculine builds. Their hair color changes from day to day, running the gamut of the colors of the humanoids around them, and their flesh glows softly in the dark. Though they’re not dangerously radioactive unless they wish to be, their presence excites the air around them, creating drifting motes of light. A hesper can focus this energy at will to project rays of fire, emit arcs of electricity, or overload electronic devices. This same energy can infuse other living creatures with focused doses of radiation, skipping the normal radiation sickness and instead causing short-lived changes to a victim’s genetic structure.

Once vanishingly rare, hespers have become somewhat commonplace as more civilizations have taken to the stars. The glowing fey are especially at home in starships, bonding to the vessels’ reactors. They can be blessings for some ships, serving as constant attendants for one of a starship’s most crucial systems, but their fickle nature also means they grow bored with regular routes or overlong stays in port, and they create drama to amuse themselves.

Huge Elemental

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

N Huge outsider (elemental)

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +14

Defense

HP: 105

EAC: 19 KAC: 21

Fort: +11 Ref: +9 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 20 ft.

Melee: slam +18 (2d6+12 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +4 Con: +2 Wis: +0 Int: -3 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +14, Athletics +14

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: any

Description

An elemental is a creature native to one of the four Elemental Planes that is composed entirely of that plane’s element. They are usually encountered alone or in groups of 2 to 8. The statistics for an elemental can be generated using one of the stat blocks above plus one of the four following grafts.

Iztheptar

Source: Starfinder #8: Escape from the Prison Moon

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

N Small humanoid

Init.: +3 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +13 (+15 with vision)

Defense

HP: 90 RP: 4

EAC: 18 KAC: 20

Fort: +9 Ref: +7 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., climb 30 ft.

Melee: venom spur +16 (1d6+10 P plus poison)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +3 Con: +5 Wis: -1 Int: +0 Cha: -2

Skills: Athletics +18, Life Science +13, Medicine +13

Languages: Azlanti

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or cluster (3–8)

Special Abilities

Adaptive Fortitude (Ex) Whenever an iztheptar succeeds at a Fortitude saving throw against a disease, an environmental hazard, or a poison, it receives a +2 insight bonus to Fortitude saving throws against the same disease, environmental hazard, or poison for the next 24 hours. This bonus also applies to Constitution checks for long-term stability and can stack up to +10. If an iztheptar survives exposure to a disease, environmental hazard, or poison for 3 days, it adapts and no longer needs to attempt saving throws against that specific affliction or hazard. If an iztheptar adapts to an affliction that can be cured without magic, the affliction is cured. An iztheptar loses this benefit if it spends more than 30 days without exposure to the affliction or hazard.

Adaptive Healing (Ex) An iztheptar recovers quickly. The DC of Medicine checks to treat an iztheptar is 5 lower than normal. An iztheptar recovers Hit Points and ability damage at twice the normal rate and recovers from poison and disease in half the normal time. When an iztheptar regains all its Hit Points, it also regrows any lost limbs or organs associated with that Hit Point loss.

Biotech Adaptive (Ex) An iztheptar can install one additional biotech augmentation into one system that already has a biotech augmentation.

Natural Bioengineer (Ex) An iztheptar is intuitively adept at Life Science and Medicine. It can use Life Science to craft, identify, and repair biotech.

Description

When they were free, iztheptars lived in hives unified by telepathy. The Azlanti used various techniques combined with iztheptar adaptability to strengthen loyalty, further lower individuality, and diminish potentially subversive telepathy. Now, iztheptars contentedly serve their enslavers in roles varying from high-risk explorers to exotic pets.

These creatures have unique reproduction. If an iztheptar perishes, part of the dead creature grows into an infant with genetic material altered based on the local environment, influencing traits and personality. An infant iztheptar imprints on the first beings that care for it, a trait useful for the communal creatures that was easily exploited by the Azlanti.

Iztheptars are natural survivors adept at biotech. They use both capabilities to endure extreme environments and alter local flora and fauna to suit their needs. Azlanti send iztheptars ahead of colonists to test environments and push ecosystems in favorable directions, with little concern for the iztheptars’ survival. The statistics here detail just such a tough iztheptar terraformer.

Kalo Deepspeaker

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 5 XP: 1,600

NG Medium monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +3 Senses: blindsight (sound) 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +11

Defense

HP: 57

EAC: 17 KAC: 17

Fort: +3 Ref: +4 Will: +9

Offense

Speed: 20 ft., swim 50 ft.

Melee: underwater tactical spear +8 (1d6+5 P)

Ranged: underwater frostbite-class zero pistol +10 (1d6+5 C; critical staggered [DC 15])

Offensive Abilities: grasping vines (DC 15)

Spells Known: Known

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +3 Con: +1 Wis: +5 Int: +0 Cha: +2

Skills: Mysticism +16, Diplomacy +16, Profession (judge) +11, Stealth +11 (+15 in water), Survival +11

Languages: Common, Kalo; speak with animals

Gear: basic Lashunta tempweave, underwater tactical spear, underwater frostbite-class zero pistol with 3 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any aquatic (Kalo-Mahoi)

Organization: solitary or delegation (1 deepspeaker and honor guard of 3–6 kalo sharkhunters)

Description

Humans often compare kalos to bats due to the thin membranes between their arms and legs. In fact, these winglike structures are fins, allowing kalos to swoop with grace and speed through the icy waters of the Brethedan moon of Kalo-Mahoi. Kalo skin has a blue-green tinge and is translucent in places. Their bulging, glowing eyes can move and focus independently.

Highly civilized and generally peaceful, kalos were the first residents of any moon to successfully win independent Pact Worlds recognition, and today, many of their coral-encrusted underwater vent cities feature air-filled spaces for terrestrial dignitaries and expatriates, with trading outposts studding the ocean world’s crusty shell of surface ice. While kalos primarily rely on sonar as they glide wraithlike through the dark oceans, their cities are riots of colored lights—testaments to the culture’s rich artistic tradition.

Few kalos lack an artistic or scholarly hobby, and though not overly tied to tradition, most kalos take pride in their history, giving their children and organizations names harkening back to ancient tribal practices. Members of military units are often given evocative names like “sharkhunters” despite their modern responsibilities. Those in traditional roles such as that of the mystical deepspeaker, who converses with—and can even command—creatures of the depths, are less necessary in the age of executives and prime ministers, yet these sages are still often sought out as arbitrators and mediators for both community and governmental disputes.

Although slower out of water, kalo warriors are renowned for their calm precision in battle, especially in zero-g and underwater, and known for using cryo weapons against enemies of other races, trusting their natural resistances to protect them from friendly fire. The average kalo is 5-1/2 feet tall and weighs 100 pounds.

Kalo Sharkhunter

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 2 XP: 600

NG Medium monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +4 Senses: blindsight (sound) 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +7

Defense

HP: 22

EAC: 16 KAC: 17

Fort: +1 Ref: +3 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 20 ft., swim 50 ft.

Melee: underwater tactical starknife +8 (1d4+3 P)

Ranged: underwater autotarget rifle +10 (1d6+2 P) or frag grenade I +10 (explode [15ft., 1d6 P, DC 11])

Offensive Abilities: fighting styles (hit-and-run), threedimensional tactics

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +4 Con: -1 Wis: +2 Int: +0 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +12 (+20 when swimming), Profession (poet) +7, Stealth +12 (+16 in water)

Languages: Common, Kalo

Gear: freebooter armor I, frag grenades I (2), underwater autotarget rifle with 50 longarm rounds, underwater tactical starknife

Ecology

Environment: any aquatic (Kalo-Mahoi)

Organization: solitary, pair, or squad (3–10)

Special Abilities

Three-Dimensional Tactics (Ex) Kalo sharkhunters are trained to fight in three dimensions. Whenever a kalo sharkhunter is fighting underwater, in zero-g, while flying, or in other situations where she isn’t restricted to a single plane of movement, she gains a +1 bonus to attack rolls in any round in which she has moved, even if it’s just a guarded step.

Description

Humans often compare kalos to bats due to the thin membranes between their arms and legs. In fact, these winglike structures are fins, allowing kalos to swoop with grace and speed through the icy waters of the Brethedan moon of Kalo-Mahoi. Kalo skin has a blue-green tinge and is translucent in places. Their bulging, glowing eyes can move and focus independently.

Highly civilized and generally peaceful, kalos were the first residents of any moon to successfully win independent Pact Worlds recognition, and today, many of their coral-encrusted underwater vent cities feature air-filled spaces for terrestrial dignitaries and expatriates, with trading outposts studding the ocean world’s crusty shell of surface ice. While kalos primarily rely on sonar as they glide wraithlike through the dark oceans, their cities are riots of colored lights—testaments to the culture’s rich artistic tradition.

Few kalos lack an artistic or scholarly hobby, and though not overly tied to tradition, most kalos take pride in their history, giving their children and organizations names harkening back to ancient tribal practices. Members of military units are often given evocative names like “sharkhunters” despite their modern responsibilities. Those in traditional roles such as that of the mystical deepspeaker, who converses with—and can even command—creatures of the depths, are less necessary in the age of executives and prime ministers, yet these sages are still often sought out as arbitrators and mediators for both community and governmental disputes.

Although slower out of water, kalo warriors are renowned for their calm precision in battle, especially in zero-g and underwater, and known for using cryo weapons against enemies of other races, trusting their natural resistances to protect them from friendly fire. The average kalo is 5-1/2 feet tall and weighs 100 pounds.

Kish

Source: Starfinder #4: The Ruined Clouds

CR: 4 XP: 1,200

N Medium humanoid (kish)

Init.: +7 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 60

EAC: 16 KAC: 18

Fort: +6 Ref: +6 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: skirmish kishaxe +13 (1d10+9 S)

Ranged: tactical battlebow +9 (1d8+4 P)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +3 Con: +0 Wis: +1 Int: -1 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +15, Acrobatics +10, Intimidate +10, Survival +15

Languages: Vulgar Kishaleen

Gear: basic acrochor hide, skirmish kishaxe, tactical battlebow with 20 arrows

Ecology

Environment: any (Nejeor VI)

Organization: solitary, pair, or patrol (3-6)

Description

Kish are the descendants of the kishalee, an advanced civilization that ruled the stars millennia ago, though they have lost any firm grasp of kishalee mystical and technological innovations. In the floating metropolis of Istamak (see page 38), kish live among the ruins of their ancestors’ civilization.

Kish are tall humanoids with three eyes and long, powerful limbs. They have sharp-toothed mandibles and smooth, hairless heads. Kish skin color ranges from gray to sky blue, with gradations in hue across their bodies. There is little variation between kish genders, though kish can easily tell males from females by subtle differences in the shape of the central eye.

Kish tend to congregate into tribes that are led by either the strongest or the wisest of their number. Some kish tribes pass leadership peacefully among themselves, while others put potential leaders to a test of might or wits—or both.

Ksarik

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 4 XP: 1,200

N Large plant

Init.: +1 Senses: blindsense (scent) 30 ft., low-light vision Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 52 RP: 3

EAC: 16 KAC: 18

Fort: +8 Ref: +6 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., climb 40 ft.

Melee: tentacle +12 (1d6+9 B plus ingested adaptation)

Ranged: acid spit +9 (1d4+4 A) or thorn dart +9 (1d6+4 P plus carrion spores)

Offensive Abilities: ingested adaptation

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +1 Con: +3 Wis: +1 Int: -3 Cha: -1

Skills: Acrobatics +10, Athletics +15 (+23 when climbing), Survival +10

Ecology

Environment: temperate or warm forests (Castrovel)

Organization: solitary, pack (2–5), or infestation (6–11)

Special Abilities

Acid Spit (Ex) As a standard action once every 1d4 rounds, a ksarik can spit a glob of acid at a target within 60 feet.

Ingested Adaptation (Su) Whenever a ksarik deals damage to a living creature with its tentacles, it siphons off a portion of the target’s genetic code and psychic resonance, temporarily reshaping its own physiology and psychology to match its victim’s. This grants the ksarik one of the following abilities (provided the target has it) for 1 minute: blindsense (up to 60 feet), blindsight (up to 60 feet), darkvision (up to 60 feet), damage reduction (up to 5/—), resistance to one type of energy damage (up to 20 points), burrow (up to 40 feet), fly (up to 40 feet, with maximum average maneuverability), swim (up to 40 feet), or water breathing. Alternatively, the ksarik can gain the ability to understand (but not speak) up to three languages that the target knows, gain the target’s weapon proficiencies (its tentacles can operate two-handed weapons in this state), or change the damage dealt by its acid spit ability to any one energy type dealt by one of the target’s supernatural attacks. A ksarik can maintain only one adaptation at a time, and gaining a new adaptation ends the previous one. A ksarik can spend 1 Resolve Point to extend the duration of an ongoing benefit by 8 hours. It can also spend 1 Resolve Point to gain a second adaptation and sustain them both simultaneously.

Thorn Dart (Ex) A ksarik can fire one of its thorns as a ranged attack. The dart has a range of 100 feet, deals piercing damage, and exposes the target to carrion spores.

Description

Ksariks’ ancestors lived on Castrovel as mindless, animate plants that scavenged for food and sprouted their seedlings within corpses, rarely posing more than an incidental threat to other species. Millennia of ongoing strife between the planet’s formians and lashuntas bombarded these primeval ksariks with psychic energy, and only decades before the two factions’ recent peace deal, the plants began exhibiting rudimentary intelligence and a predatory drive. In an unsettlingly small number of generations, ksariks have developed a pack mentality, low cunning, and the preternatural ability to adopt competitors’ strengths.

A typical ksarik is a 12-foot-long quadruped made up of dense plant matter, including specialized tissues such as powerful tendons, woody internal supports that resemble bones, and flexible sheets of lignin that serve as a form of armor. Its head is immense and stocky, comprising approximately a dozen feeding tendrils that obscure its underdeveloped mouthparts. Its eyestalks project from either side of its head, providing a wide range of vision that sacrifices much of its ability to see targets immediately in front of it. To make up for this, a ksarik’s feeding tendrils are covered in an array of unusual sensory organs: some can discern the source of smells, while others sense movement and changes in light.

Originally occupying a niche between decomposers and scavengers, ksariks adapted to sniff out carrion and digest every piece of a rotting corpse. A ksarik’s body produces a steady supply of several different acids that help it break down food into a more manageable form, and modern ksariks regularly employ these acids in self-defense and hunting. The plants also have numerous thorns that grow along their legs and back. Botanists theorize that these also served as selfdefense when the ksariks were slower-moving creatures that resided lower on the food chain. Now, however, ksariks use these thorns as a form of reproduction, firing them into live prey and infecting those creatures with spores that gradually grow into nascent ksariks that feed on the host, and then painfully burrow out of the flesh days later. The spores must be fertilized beforehand in a process that resembles sexual congress between two ksariks, leaving both with a supply of seeds that remain viable for months afterward.

The most fearsome of the ksarik’s abilities is its capability of extracting and assimilating other creatures’ genetic codes, temporarily mimicking its prey’s adaptations. Studies suggest this ability is as much tied to a ksarik’s physical characteristics as it is some rudimentary psychic ability that allows the plant to adjust its body in accordance with a stolen genetic blueprint. Most of this code is unstable within the plants, meaning ksariks can rarely maintain an adaptation for more than a minute or, at most, a few hours. However, trace amounts of foreign DNA remain, and it appears that parents are able to pass lesser versions of their adopted abilities to their offspring.

This enhanced evolution has drawn ksariks into otherwise unsuitable habitats on Castrovel, where they have quickly outcompeted other species, even driving several of them to extinction. Due to this explosive growth, most lashuntas consider them an ecological nuisance, though xenobiologists have lobbied against the species’ eradication until it can be properly studied—especially now that the ksariks have begun absorbing and demonstrating signs of rudimentary culture.

The most notable evidence of this cultural development is the lilting melodies ksariks sing when in close proximity to one another. Scientists have yet to discover the purpose of these songs, as their best efforts to determine if they provide any information to the plants has failed. What’s more, their attempts to replicate the sounds only lead to angering nearby ksariks, the creatures being seemingly affronted by the endeavor. These sounds appear to emanate directly from a ksarik’s skin instead of any particular orifice, a fact that opponents of ksarik conservation hold as proof that the plants aren’t purposefully making them. Of course, those on the other side of the argument believe it doesn’t matter from where the songs come.

Kyokor

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 20 XP: 307,200

CE Colossal magical (beast)

Init.: +6 Senses: blindsense (thought) 120 ft., sense the masses Perception: +34

Defense

HP: 485

EAC: 35 KAC: 37

Fort: +23 Ref: +19 Will: +21

Offense

Speed: 100 ft., swim 100 ft.

Melee: bite +35 (4d12+29 P) or claw +35 (4d12+29 S) or slam +35 (8d6+29 B)

Offensive Abilities: demolish structures, enthrall victims

Statistics

Str: +9 Dex: +6 Con: +12 Wis: +5 Int: +6 Cha: +4

Skills: Intimidate +39, Sense Motive +34, Survival +34

Languages: Ancient Daimalkan, Common

Ecology

Environment: any (Daimalko)

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Demolish Structures (Ex) A kyokor has an exoskeleton that is harder than most metals, and it can therefore use its body against urban structures with deadly effect. A kyokor’s natural weapons ignore the hardness of all structures not made of adamantine alloy or a harder material. Against structures made of such materials, a kyokor’s natural weapons ignore half of the structure’s hardness.

Enthrall Victims (Su) The force with which a kyokor destroys structures is laced with strange, ancient psychic energy. When a kyokor attacks a structure, all creatures within 100 feet with an Intelligence modifier of –3 or higher must succeed at a DC 25 Will saving throw or be stunned for as long as the kyokor is attacking a structure or any other creature within 100 feet. Each time the kyokor attacks a creature that a stunned victim can see, that victim can attempt a new saving throw. If a kyokor attacks a stunned creature, the stunned effect immediately ends. This is a mind-affecting fear effect.

Sense the Masses (Su) Large concentrations of sentient creatures are like beacons of light that call to kyokors. A kyokor can sense groups of 2,000 or more intelligent creatures gathered together in a single settlement out to 5 miles. This ability does not allow a kyokor to know exactly how many creatures are in a given location, but it does allow it to pinpoint pockets of intelligent life and know which pockets are the most populous.

Description

Kyokors are one of the most common types of colossi that rampage like a living apocalypse across the ruined planet Daimalko (see page 464 of the Starfinder Core Rulebook for more information). These mammoth, bipedal alien horrors are large enough to take out an entire city block with a few sweeps of their hulking claws, and in fact this seems to be exactly what they evolved—or were designed—to do.

Kyokors are enormous juggernauts covered in shell-like exoskeletons of armored plates, from between which they can extrude hundreds of wriggling tonguelike appendages. They have occasionally been observed using these grotesque tendrils in those rare situations in which they need fine manipulation ability (though they may have others uses as well). Certainly the jagged crablike claws on their arms are useless for grabbing anything smaller than a boulder; these are used almost exclusively to spear and smash. A kyokor has an armored skull with a strangely elongated chin, tiny glowing eyes peeking out from a cavernous gash, and sharp growths like a crown of teeth rising from the top of its head. A single kyokor is typically about 150 feet tall and weighs more than 20,000 tons.

Although most Daimalkans who have ventured to the planet’s surface have seen at least one kyokor from afar, only a handful of the bravest explorers and heroes have ever seen one up close. Most known information about these colossi comes from bloodstained, hastily scrawled records created during the Awakening (the planetwide cataclysm that released the kyokors and other colossi from their slumber deep within the oceans). According to these dossiers, kyokors have the ability to sense large populations of humanoids from incredible distances and to grip their victims’ minds in fear as they gleefully destroy whole cities. The latter ability leaves populations at the mercy of the beasts, and likely contributed to how quickly Daimalko fell into ruins during the Awakening. It’s also said that kyokors are capable of speech, but that no one alive has heard a kyokor’s voice.

Kyokors target population centers, and they seem to equally revel in the fear they produce as they demolish buildings and snatch up tiny humanoid snacks to eat. The monsters are voraciously hungry, but whether it’s destruction or meat that sustains them is unknown. Kyokors exhibit surprising intelligence and are fiercely independent. They occasionally fight other colossi in grudge matches that blast entire landscapes.

Among citizens of the Pact Worlds, rumors swirl about elite bands of Daimalkan colossi hunters who have taken down kyokors and reaped impossible riches from their corpses. Given the creatures’ history, though, the veracity of such claims is question.

Large Elemental

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 5 XP: 1,600

N Large outsider (elemental)

Init.: +3 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +11

Defense

HP: 70

EAC: 17 KAC: 19

Fort: +9 Ref: +7 Will: +4

Offense

Speed: 20 ft.

Melee: slam +15 (1d6+10 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +3 Con: +2 Wis: +0 Int: -3 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +11, Athletics +11

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: any

Description

An elemental is a creature native to one of the four Elemental Planes that is composed entirely of that plane’s element. They are usually encountered alone or in groups of 2 to 8. The statistics for an elemental can be generated using one of the stat blocks above plus one of the four following grafts.

Living Hologram

Source: Starfinder #4: The Ruined Clouds

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

CE Medium construct (incorporeal)

Init.: +6 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +16

Defense

HP: 115

EAC: 20 KAC: 21

Fort: +5 Ref: +5 Will: +9

Offense

Speed: fly 30 ft. (Su, perfect)

Melee: hardlight slam +18 (1d12+8 B; critical dazzled [DC 18])

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +6 Con:Wis: +1 Int: +2 Cha: +4

Skills: Acrobatics +21 (+29 to fly), Bluff +16, Computers +21, Culture +16, Stealth +21

Languages: one language determined by original creator

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Freeze (Ex) A living hologram can hold perfectly still so that it appears to be a normal hologram. It can take 20 on Stealth checks to hide in plain sight as a hologram (usually among other holograms).

Hardlight Slam (Ex) As an attack, a living hologram can temporarily cause its fist (or a melee weapon, if it has been programmed to have one) to become substantial. This functions as a natural weapon that deals bludgeoning damage. On a critical hit, the attack creates a bright flash of light and the target must succeed at a DC 18 Reflex save or be dazzled for 1 round.

Rejuvenation (Ex) In most cases, it is difficult to completely destroy a living hologram in combat. A living hologram reduced to 0 Hit Points vanishes, though its corrupted projector reconstructs it in 1d4 hours. The only way to permanently destroy a living hologram is to find its projector and either repair or destroy it. Living holograms are aware their existences are tied to their projectors and protect the machinery at all costs.

Tethered (Ex) A living hologram can’t travel more than 100 feet from its projector. If it is ever forced to do so, it is immediately destroyed, though only temporarily (see rejuvenation above).

Description

In many technologically advanced societies, holograms are used in advertising, entertainment, and other industries to catch the eye when two-dimensional images would otherwise fall flat. At their simplest, holograms are silent, still images in a single color, often at a low resolution. More complex projectors can offer full color and a few repeated frames of animation, while the most advanced varieties can be programmed with artificial personalities and interact with their viewers. Implementations of this most sophisticated version of the technology are wide ranging, and holograms serve as instructors in educational institutions, as tour guides for famous locales in large cities, and even as concierges at luxury hotels.

On very rare occasions, usually through a fault in the machinery of its projector, an advanced hologram gains a modicum of sentience and, sometimes, a twisted idea of the reason for its existence. These “tech ghosts,” as some call them, can appear in almost any shape, limited only by the capabilities of their projectors, and they use their forms of living light to harass their foes—sometimes even striking from a hiding spot in another holographic display—though they are always confined to the area near their projector.

Maraquoi Hunter

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 1 XP: 200

NG Medium humanoid (maraquoi)

Init.: +4 Senses: low-light vision, blindsense (30 ft.) Perception: +4

Defense

HP: 13

EAC: 10 KAC: 12

Fort: +2 Ref: +1 Will: +2

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: tactical spear +6 (1d6+2 P)

Ranged: pulsecaster rifle +3 (1d6 E)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +0 Con: +3 Wis: +1 Int: +0 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +4 (+12 when climbing), Stealth +4, Survival +9

Languages: Common, Maraquoi

Gear: pulsecaster rifle with 2 batteries (20 charges each), tactical spear

Ecology

Environment: any (Marata)

Organization: solitary, hunt (2–4), or warband (4–12 plus 1 maraquoi shaman)

Description

Maraquoi are the primary native race of Marata, one of Bretheda’s moons. A primitive culture until relatively recently, maraquoi have made rapid technological advances as a result of interplanetary trade, yet they maintain many of the traditions of their ancestors. Maraquoi stand slightly taller than humans on average, and their bodies are covered with silky fur that acts like thousands of tiny antennae, transmitting sound to their sensitive skin. Maraquoi also each have a prehensile simian tail that allows them to manipulate objects.

More than anything else, the maraquoi’s complex genders and familial structures set them apart from other races. Where many humanoid races in the Pact Worlds have a binary system of sexual reproduction, maraquoi have seven different sexes, each playing a different role in the process of reproduction. The ilsha, qsha, and susha (roughly translated to “earth-sire,” “sky-sire,” and “water-sire,” respectively) each contribute genetic material to the uisha (“sharer”). Shortly thereafter, the uisha passes the fetal maraquoi on to a klsha (“bearer”), who carries the child to term. Once born, the infant maraquoi must be passed on to a mesha (“cradle”), who carries the child in a marsupial-style pouch and nurses them until they wean. The most unusual sex might be the zysha (“facilitator”). While a zysha does not have much to do with the physical process of reproduction, their presence throughout is vital, as they somehow still pass on elements of their genetic code to the developing maraquoi. Monogamous marriage and similar traditions are unknown in traditional maraquoi culture, and despite the influx of media from other worlds, most maraquoi remain perplexed or amused by the concept.

Maraquoi culture has a deep respect for life and the notion of family. The loss of several tribe members could prevent reproduction altogether, and so every life must be protected and treasured. This applies to other forms of life as well, and each hunt is traditionally followed by a ritual honoring the slain beast. Nearly all maraquoi consider themselves part of a single extended family, and intertribal conflict is rarely lethal. At the same time, the abundance of predatory fauna on their home world means that maraquoi warriors are both common and extremely skilled, using their abilities to guard their tribes. The practice of turning to mercenary work on other planets has deeply divided the maraquoi in recent generations: some believe there’s no conflict with their belief system so long as they never kill other maraquoi, while others rail against what they see as an abandonment of virtue and the exploitation of their noble guardians by outside interests. Even maraquoi mercenaries, however, retain much of their traditional honor system, with rituals recognizing fallen friends and foes alike.

Many maraquoi treasure their ancient hunter-gatherer customs, and some tribes still dwell in cliffside caves and split-log longhouses in the deep forests, with only basic technological conveniences. Others follow cattlelizard herds across rocky plateaus but use modern vehicles and weapons. Still others seek to fully industrialize, and in recent years they have created impressive urban settlements, mining and exporting the planet’s natural resources in violation of the traditionally communal approach to property. Tensions are increasing between the various groups, and some maraquoi fear that their society is on the verge of fracturing beyond repair.

Maraquoi Shaman

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

NG Medium humanoid (maraquoi)

Init.: +0 Senses: low-light vision, blindsense (sound) 30 ft. Perception: +16

Defense

HP: 105 RP: 4

EAC: 19 KAC: 20

Fort: +7 Ref: +7 Will: +11

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: sentinel spear +15 (2d6+9 P)

Ranged: sentinel spear +13 (2d6+9 P)

Offensive Abilities: None

Spells Known: Known

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +0 Con: +4 Wis: +6 Int: +1 Cha: +2

Skills: Diplomacy +16, Medicine +21, Mysticism +21

Languages: Common, Maraquoi

Gear: d-suit II, sentinel spear

Ecology

Environment: any (Marata)

Organization: solitary or warband (1 plus 4–12 maraquoi hunters)

Description

Maraquoi are the primary native race of Marata, one of Bretheda’s moons. A primitive culture until relatively recently, maraquoi have made rapid technological advances as a result of interplanetary trade, yet they maintain many of the traditions of their ancestors. Maraquoi stand slightly taller than humans on average, and their bodies are covered with silky fur that acts like thousands of tiny antennae, transmitting sound to their sensitive skin. Maraquoi also each have a prehensile simian tail that allows them to manipulate objects.

More than anything else, the maraquoi’s complex genders and familial structures set them apart from other races. Where many humanoid races in the Pact Worlds have a binary system of sexual reproduction, maraquoi have seven different sexes, each playing a different role in the process of reproduction. The ilsha, qsha, and susha (roughly translated to “earth-sire,” “sky-sire,” and “water-sire,” respectively) each contribute genetic material to the uisha (“sharer”). Shortly thereafter, the uisha passes the fetal maraquoi on to a klsha (“bearer”), who carries the child to term. Once born, the infant maraquoi must be passed on to a mesha (“cradle”), who carries the child in a marsupial-style pouch and nurses them until they wean. The most unusual sex might be the zysha (“facilitator”). While a zysha does not have much to do with the physical process of reproduction, their presence throughout is vital, as they somehow still pass on elements of their genetic code to the developing maraquoi. Monogamous marriage and similar traditions are unknown in traditional maraquoi culture, and despite the influx of media from other worlds, most maraquoi remain perplexed or amused by the concept.

Maraquoi culture has a deep respect for life and the notion of family. The loss of several tribe members could prevent reproduction altogether, and so every life must be protected and treasured. This applies to other forms of life as well, and each hunt is traditionally followed by a ritual honoring the slain beast. Nearly all maraquoi consider themselves part of a single extended family, and intertribal conflict is rarely lethal. At the same time, the abundance of predatory fauna on their home world means that maraquoi warriors are both common and extremely skilled, using their abilities to guard their tribes. The practice of turning to mercenary work on other planets has deeply divided the maraquoi in recent generations: some believe there’s no conflict with their belief system so long as they never kill other maraquoi, while others rail against what they see as an abandonment of virtue and the exploitation of their noble guardians by outside interests. Even maraquoi mercenaries, however, retain much of their traditional honor system, with rituals recognizing fallen friends and foes alike.

Many maraquoi treasure their ancient hunter-gatherer customs, and some tribes still dwell in cliffside caves and split-log longhouses in the deep forests, with only basic technological conveniences. Others follow cattlelizard herds across rocky plateaus but use modern vehicles and weapons. Still others seek to fully industrialize, and in recent years they have created impressive urban settlements, mining and exporting the planet’s natural resources in violation of the traditionally communal approach to property. Tensions are increasing between the various groups, and some maraquoi fear that their society is on the verge of fracturing beyond repair.

Marooned One

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

NE Medium undead

Init.: +4 Senses: blindsight (life) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +16

Defense

HP: 115

EAC: 23 KAC: 25

Fort: +11 Ref: +7 Will: +13

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: tactical knife +17 (2d4+10 S)

Ranged: advanced semi-auto pistol +15 (2d6+8 P)

Offensive Abilities: strangle

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +4 Con:Wis: +1 Int: +6 Cha: +1

Skills: Computers +21, Culture +16, Engineering +21 (+26 to disable life-support systems), Stealth +21, Survival +16

Languages: Common, 1 other language known in life

Gear: kasatha microcord III, advanced semi-auto pistol with 30 small arm rounds, tactical knife

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary or desolation (2–5)

Special Abilities

Sabotage Life Support (Ex) A marooned one gains a +5 bonus to Engineering checks to disable a device that provides life support.

Strangle (Su) When a marooned one succeeds at a grapple combat maneuver, the target must attempt a DC 18 Fortitude save. If the target fails, it takes 1d12+10 bludgeoning damage and 1d4 Constitution damage; if it succeeds, it takes half the bludgeoning damage and negates the Constitution damage.

Description

There is a special psychological pain in watching your last chance of survival slip out of sight. Those who are left behind to die in the cold of space—whether on a deserted asteroid or a derelict ship—sometimes arise as a special type of undead called a marooned one. Whether they died of asphyxiation, dehydration, or starvation, unfortunate souls that arise as marooned ones have a desiccated look, with taut skin stretched across their bones. Depending on how long it took them to die, they may have patched environment suits or other signs of their attempts to prolong their isolated lives as long as possible. Many show evidence of madness, both from the psychological pain of their abandonment and from the supernatural dread of the horrific transformation that awaits them just on the other side of death. They often have elaborate tattoos or ritual scarification—marks to count each day of their abandonment are common—or signs of dramatic self-harm, sometimes even including obvious signs of suicide from last-ditch efforts to end their loneliness or avoid the undead eternities that await them. Regardless of their mortal forms or alterations thereto, all marooned ones are distinguishable from similar undead by their glowing, ice-blue eyes and mouths that open unnaturally wide in cheek-splitting and jaw-cracking screams of fury.

Marooned ones inevitably remain near the place of their abandonment, ironically assuring that nobody recovers their remains or otherwise disturbs their final resting place without paying the price. While they have nearly as much intelligence as they did in life, their original personalities erode quickly under the corrosive power of the malicious energies reanimating them, and they use their cognition and what remains of their memories in service of a single purpose: causing other living creatures to suffer the same fate as they did.

The only time one of these undead feels something close to pleasure is when it forces or tricks a group of intruders in its territory into leaving one of their own behind. The marooned one avoids killing this castaway if possible, instead attempting to bond with the victim over their shared fate, increasing the chance that the intruder rises as a marooned one when it dies. This bonding can seem strangely caring; as soon as its victim’s fate is sealed, a marooned one gives every appearance of sympathizing with its prey, even giving advice on how to continue to survive in their current environment as long as possible. This emotion is hollow, however, for a marooned one can never be convinced to allow a victim to escape, and what personality the undead manages to manifest during these conversations inevitably fades again with the victim’s death and rebirth as a fellow undead. Once such a transformation occurs, the marooned ones show little interest in one another, waiting in total silence for more of the living to wander into their shared territory.

Marooned ones can operate any equipment they could in life and, as a representative sample of spacefarers, are often quite technologically savvy. They are frequently armed with weaponry appropriate to their earlier station, but they use such arms mostly to threaten and intimidate, and they prefer to strangle victims to death if marooning them isn’t possible. Their technological acumen is also a major part of their threat, as starship crews sometimes don’t realize they’re in danger until a marooned one has already quietly and permanently disabled their starship, trapping them in the creature’s territory.

Marooned ones are most often found in the hulks of dead starships and other places where spacefarers have been left to die slowly, adrift in the black due to mechanical failure or malicious pirates. Yet marooned ones can also arise in perfectly habitable but dangerously isolated regions: colonists and explorers stranded on new worlds, soldiers abandoned by allies on a battlefield—anyone who dies after being left behind can potentially turn into a marooned one.

Medium Elemental

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 3 XP: 800

N Medium outsider (elemental)

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +8

Defense

HP: 40

EAC: 14 KAC: 16

Fort: +7 Ref: +5 Will: +2

Offense

Speed: 20 ft.

Melee: slam +12 (1d6+7 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +2 Con: +1 Wis: +0 Int: -3 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +8, Athletics +8

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: any

Description

An elemental is a creature native to one of the four Elemental Planes that is composed entirely of that plane’s element. They are usually encountered alone or in groups of 2 to 8. The statistics for an elemental can be generated using one of the stat blocks above plus one of the four following grafts.

Mountain Eel

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

N Huge animal

Init.: +6 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +13

Defense

HP: 95

EAC: 18 KAC: 20

Fort: +10 Ref: +10 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: bite +16 (1d8+11 P)

Offensive Abilities: paralyzing gaze (60 ft., DC 14), trample (1d8+11 B, DC 16)

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +2 Con: +3 Wis: +0 Int: -4 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +18, Stealth +18

Ecology

Environment: temperate or warm mountains (Castrovel)

Organization: solitary, pair, or bed (3–5)

Special Abilities

Paralyzing Gaze (Ex) Looking into a mountain eel’s strange compound eyes causes the muscles of most living creatures to freeze up. A living creature that can see and begins its turn within 60 feet of a mountain eel must succeed at a DC 14 Fortitude save or be paralyzed for 1 round. A creature who succeeds at its save is immune to that mountain eel’s paralyzing gaze for 24 hours. Creatures without a sense of sight and other mountain eels are immune to this effect.

Description

Due to some quirk of parallel evolution, these massive creatures have features resembling their waterborne kin’s, especially their gaping maws filled with terrible teeth. On the other hand, mountain eels have large, arthropodan compound eyes, and their coloring tends to range from dark to very dark green. Mountain eels dwell on the slopes of the mountains of Castrovel, gliding quietly between the trees as they hunt for prey. The gaze of a mountain eel paralyzes most creatures, allowing the beast to run its victims down and feast on their corpses. A typical mountain eel is about 5 feet tall but 60 feet from nostrils to tail if laid out in a straight line, though it constantly squirms and contorts its body. Despite its size, a mountain eel is very light, weighing approximately 300 pounds.

Mountain eels are carnivores, and they prefer their meals to be freshly dead before they tear into the flesh. However, they need to eat close to their weight in food every day, so they have been known to devour longdead creatures if enough meat remains on the bones. If a mountain eel has sated its appetite before completely consuming its prey, it simply leaves the body to rot, sometimes coming back to it the following day or leaving it for scavengers (or other mountain eels). Mountain eels get almost all of their hydration from eating, and they tend to avoid larger bodies of water, though it isn’t uncommon to spot a mountain eel splashing through a small stream or turning its face up toward the sky during a rainstorm. Despite their massive bulk, mountain eels are surprisingly quiet in most of their movements, as they distribute their weight across the length of their bodies using their multitude of winged armlike appendages. The creatures also use these arms to push underbrush and small trees to one side as they travel, to avoid the telling sounds of snapping branches and crunching twigs. As a mountain eel closes in on its prey, however, it abandons all attempts at subtlety to gather up enough speed to crush its targets.

In addition to their uncannily quiet locomotion, mountain eels only very infrequently vocalize in any way. After years of study, scientists have discovered that the creatures’ vocal chords are almost completely vestigial. After noticing dozens of small scent glands located just under their scales during their dissections, these researchers posited that mountain eels communicate with one another through smells. Xenobiologists are still unsure exactly how this ability works, but mountain eel hunters and others who live in mountain eel territory have learned that certain smells mean danger.

Mountain eels give birth to live offspring, a messy process that produces a handful of nearly translucent, mucus-covered elvers that are each almost as big as a human. Though newly born mountain elvers’ size might allow them to hunt right away, their fearsome fangs don’t grow in for several weeks. During this time, the parent eels bring small chunks of meat to their offspring, which swallow the food whole. As they start feeding, their pigmentation slowly comes in, and when they do finally develop their teeth, the elvers can take down their own, albeit smaller, prey. It takes several more years of constant eating before an elver becomes a full adult mountain eel and another few years before it reaches sexual maturity.

Judging on appearance alone, it is difficult to tell an elderly mountain eel from an adult. A mountain eel close to the end of its life tends to move a little slower, however, and the odors it emanates become more flowery. Once it becomes unable to catch enough food, the beast slowly starves to death. A mountain eel’s corpse quickly succumbs to the elements, rotting faster than most other dead flesh and attracting teeming swarms of insects. Even a dead mountain eel’s bones seem to disappear after a few days in Castrovelian weather; they are often mistaken for fallen logs covered in a thick layer of bright-green moss.

Some lashuntas and formians enjoy hunting mountain eels, despite (and many would say because of) the danger they pose. These thrill seekers equip themselves with sniper rifles and veils before setting out for the planet’s mountainous areas. The eels leave very little trace of their movements through the foliage, so hunters must be on the lookout for partially chewed carcasses and other signs of mountain eel habitation, such as an increased insect population. Once they find one of the beasts, they make sure to isolate it before striking. Successful lashunta hunters skin the dead eels to make items of clothing, which they sometimes enchant (like the items presented below). Formians, on the other hand, enjoy cooking mountain eel meat, using an array of exotic spices.

Necrovite

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 13 XP: 25,600

NE Medium undead

Init.: +3 Senses: blindsight (life) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +23

Aura: ue Aura (Su)

Defense

HP: 186 RP: 5

EAC: 29 KAC: 30

Fort: +12 Ref: +12 Will: +18

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 60 ft. (Su, average)

Melee: None

Ranged: perihelion laser pistol +22 (4d4+13 F; critical burn 2d4)

Offensive Abilities: undead mastery

Spells Known: (CL 13th; ranged +22)

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +3 Con:Wis: +4 Int: +8 Cha: +6

Skills: Bluff +28, Computers +28, Engineering +28, Mysticism +28, Sense Motive +28

Languages: Common, Eoxian, Sarcesian; limited telepathy 30 ft.

Gear: d-suit IV (gray force field [20 temporary HP])

Ecology

Environment: any (Eox)

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Fatigue Aura (Su) Any creature that comes within 30 feet of a necrovite is fatigued unless it succeeds at a DC 21 Fortitude saving throw. A creature that is already fatigued suffers no additional effect. A creature that successfully saves cannot be affected again by the same necrovite’s aura for 24 hours.

Rejuvenation (Su) When a necrovite is destroyed, its electroencephalon immediately begins to rebuild the creature’s body nearby and download the necrovite’s consciousness into it. After 1d8 days, the necrovite wakens fully healed (albeit without any gear it left behind on its old body).

Undead Mastery (Su) As a standard action, a necrovite can cause one undead creature within 50 feet to fall under its control as per control undead (Will DC 21 negates). This control is permanent for unintelligent undead; an undead creature with an Intelligence score can attempt an additional saving throw each day to break free. A creature that successfully saves cannot be affected again by the necrovite’s undead mastery for 24 hours. A necrovite can control a group of undead whose total CR is no greater than twice its CR (26 for the typical necrovite).

Description

Long ago, when the native humanoids of Eox—called elebrians—destroyed two neighboring planets, the backlash devastated their own world as well, forcing them to turn to necromancy to survive. The most powerful spellcasters among these survivors combined their advanced technology with the ancient magical traditions of lichdom to achieve immortality in the form of eternal undeath. These were the first necrovites, and along with their colleagues who sought refuge in other forms of undeath, they took control of their ravaged planet to become the first bone sages, Eox’s notoriously aloof heads of state.

Becoming a necrovite is a long and arduous process, but the crux of the ritual involves extracting the spellcaster’s consciousness and soul and imprisoning them in a technomagical relic called an electroencephalon. The spellcaster dies but becomes undead, and as long as her electroencephalon remains intact she can continue her existence without fear of the passage of time.

In addition to constructing an electroencephalon to house her soul, a prospective necrovite must also research and learn the proper ritual to transfer her life force into the receptacle and prepare her body for the transformation into undeath. This ritual is unique to each body and soul—what works for one necrovite will not work for another—and likely has deleterious effects. The exact methods for each spellcaster’s transformation into a necrovite are left to the GM’s discretion, but the process should involve expenditures of hundreds of thousands of credits, multiple dangerous quests, and many difficult skill checks over the course of months, years, or decades.

The above stat block represents an elebrian necrovite—a necrovite formed from one of Eox’s original humanoid inhabitants—but other races can become necrovites as well, using the template graft in the sidebar.

Nihili Captain

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 13 XP: 25,600

NE Medium undead

Init.: +6 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +23

Aura: gravity well (5 ft., DC 21)

Defense

HP: 270

EAC: 27 KAC: 29

Fort: +15 Ref: +15 Will: +14

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: slam +26 (3d12+21 B)

Offensive Abilities: decompression gaze (15 ft., DC 21, 3d8+11 B)

Statistics

Str: +8 Dex: +6 Con:Wis: +0 Int: +4 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +28 (+36 when climbing), Stealth +23

Ecology

Environment: any vacuum

Organization: any

Special Abilities

Decompression Gaze (Su) The dead stare of a nihili makes those around the undead feel like their own lungs are starting to violently collapse, mimicking the nihili’s demise. A living creature that can see and breathe that begins its turn within 15 feet of a nihili must succeed at a DC 15 Fortitude save or take 1d4+3 bludgeoning damage.

Gravity Well (Su) A nihili generates a field of gravity that functions in a 5-foot aura around itself (including 5 feet above the nihili), exerting a downward force toward the nihili’s feet. This allows the nihili to function as if constantly under the effect of spider climb. Any creature entering this aura from an area of zero-g must succeed at a DC 15 Reflex saving throw or be knocked prone.

Description

More so than any harsh desert or freezing tundra, the airless void of space is an unforgiving killer. Most life-forms can survive for about 90 seconds in a vacuum before dying, though rapid depressurization can cause unconsciousness in as little as 15 seconds. When an unprotected body is introduced to a vacuum, the gases inside it begin to expand due to the difference in pressure. While this causes discomfort, especially in the abdominal area due to the expansion of intestinal gases, the real danger comes from any oxygen still in the lungs. If that gas can’t escape (say, because the person is trying to hold his breath), the delicate pulmonary tissue can become severely damaged. Those who survive such an event can be left with permanent injuries, such as blindness, a collapsed lung, or worse. Those who do not survive spend their last few moments in terrible pain and mind-numbing terror, and sometimes such suffering prevents souls from passing on to the afterlife. These unfortunate creatures rise again as undead monstrosities known as nihilis.

With puffy skin, ragged wounds from gases escaping the body, and gaping mouths, nihilis might resemble mindless zombies, but they have a sharp intellect and powers that make them far more formidable. A nihili’s gaze can crush the lungs of any living creature who sees it, as if the victim were being squeezed by a giant hand. In addition, nihilis creates their own gravity, allowing them to move easily about the wrecked starships where they are usually found. This aura can surprise those attempting to float past nihilis in zero gravity, often causing them to fall face first onto whatever surfaces the undead are standing on. Nihilis that perished floating through the void use this ability to cling to passing vehicles, eventually working their way inside to slaughter the vessels’ crews.

Nihilis have an everlasting hatred of the living, especially of spacefarers for daring to travel the void. Some scholars posit that nihilis are the embodiment of outer space’s cruelest aspects and exist only to punish those who sully its vacuum. While most scoff at the idea of ascribing a will to something so vast and pervasive as space, there is no denying that nihilis exist and are vicious killers. The undead use their natural cunning to lie in wait for potential victims, usually crouching in dark corners near the ceiling where few think to look before springing into combat. They fight with almost no sense of self-preservation, unless vastly outnumbered, at which time the nihilis turn and flee. Once nihilis have killed their victims, they usually leave the corpses where they fall, having no desire to consume living flesh or blood. They then begin the hunt for further prey.

Most nihilis occur naturally, but they can be created by powerful spellcasters using the

spell. Animating a nihili in this way requires crushed rock from a planetoid with no atmosphere as part of casting the spell. Nihilis created by Eoxian necromancers are sometimes assigned to ships of the Corpse Fleet as engineers, as they can walk along the outside of the vessels with little difficulty in order to make repairs. An ambitious nihili who proves its worth might eventually become the captain of its own Corpse Fleet ship.

Rumors speak of a cult of nihilis in the fringes of the Vast who have discovered a small tear in reality that opens up onto the Negative Energy Plane. Calling it a “dark star,” these nihilis eject corpses (usually of victims they have killed) into the surrounding vacuum as sacrifices; some of these bodies are animated as nihilis who immediately attain honored positions in the cult, as they preach of sinister whispers from beyond the portal that encourage this gruesome form of reproduction. When one of these nihilis is destroyed, its remaining flesh is almost instantly flensed from its body, leaving a skeleton marked with glowing blue runes that are difficult for living creatures to focus on—attempting to do so results in blurred vision and nosebleeds. The few mystics who have studied these runes (usually through sketches or eyewitness descriptions) have yet to decipher their meaning. A small handful of rune-marked bones are kept in smoked-glass cases inside secure vaults by a few arcane research bases within the Pact Worlds.

No one knows for certain whether the nihilis who worship this “dark star” are venerating a shadowy entity or are suffering from some unknown kind of madness. However, travelers who survive passing through this region return with tales of huge masses of floating corpses forming a ring around a cloud of ebony particles that seems to absorb all light.

Nihili

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 5 XP: 1,600

NE Medium undead

Init.: +3 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +11

Aura: gravity well (5 ft., DC 15)

Defense

HP: 72

EAC: 17 KAC: 19

Fort: +7 Ref: +7 Will: +6

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., climb 20 ft.

Melee: slam +14 (1d6+10 B)

Offensive Abilities: decompression gaze (15 ft., DC 15, 1d4+3 B)

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +3 Con:Wis: +0 Int: +2 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +16 (+24 when climbing), Stealth +11

Ecology

Environment: any vacuum

Organization: any

Special Abilities

Decompression Gaze (Su) The dead stare of a nihili makes those around the undead feel like their own lungs are starting to violently collapse, mimicking the nihili’s demise. A living creature that can see and breathe that begins its turn within 15 feet of a nihili must succeed at a DC 15 Fortitude save or take 1d4+3 bludgeoning damage.

Gravity Well (Su) A nihili generates a field of gravity that functions in a 5-foot aura around itself (including 5 feet above the nihili), exerting a downward force toward the nihili’s feet. This allows the nihili to function as if constantly under the effect of spider climb. Any creature entering this aura from an area of zero-g must succeed at a DC 15 Reflex saving throw or be knocked prone.

Description

More so than any harsh desert or freezing tundra, the airless void of space is an unforgiving killer. Most life-forms can survive for about 90 seconds in a vacuum before dying, though rapid depressurization can cause unconsciousness in as little as 15 seconds. When an unprotected body is introduced to a vacuum, the gases inside it begin to expand due to the difference in pressure. While this causes discomfort, especially in the abdominal area due to the expansion of intestinal gases, the real danger comes from any oxygen still in the lungs. If that gas can’t escape (say, because the person is trying to hold his breath), the delicate pulmonary tissue can become severely damaged. Those who survive such an event can be left with permanent injuries, such as blindness, a collapsed lung, or worse. Those who do not survive spend their last few moments in terrible pain and mind-numbing terror, and sometimes such suffering prevents souls from passing on to the afterlife. These unfortunate creatures rise again as undead monstrosities known as nihilis.

With puffy skin, ragged wounds from gases escaping the body, and gaping mouths, nihilis might resemble mindless zombies, but they have a sharp intellect and powers that make them far more formidable. A nihili’s gaze can crush the lungs of any living creature who sees it, as if the victim were being squeezed by a giant hand. In addition, nihilis creates their own gravity, allowing them to move easily about the wrecked starships where they are usually found. This aura can surprise those attempting to float past nihilis in zero gravity, often causing them to fall face first onto whatever surfaces the undead are standing on. Nihilis that perished floating through the void use this ability to cling to passing vehicles, eventually working their way inside to slaughter the vessels’ crews.

Nihilis have an everlasting hatred of the living, especially of spacefarers for daring to travel the void. Some scholars posit that nihilis are the embodiment of outer space’s cruelest aspects and exist only to punish those who sully its vacuum. While most scoff at the idea of ascribing a will to something so vast and pervasive as space, there is no denying that nihilis exist and are vicious killers. The undead use their natural cunning to lie in wait for potential victims, usually crouching in dark corners near the ceiling where few think to look before springing into combat. They fight with almost no sense of self-preservation, unless vastly outnumbered, at which time the nihilis turn and flee. Once nihilis have killed their victims, they usually leave the corpses where they fall, having no desire to consume living flesh or blood. They then begin the hunt for further prey.

Most nihilis occur naturally, but they can be created by powerful spellcasters using the

spell. Animating a nihili in this way requires crushed rock from a planetoid with no atmosphere as part of casting the spell. Nihilis created by Eoxian necromancers are sometimes assigned to ships of the Corpse Fleet as engineers, as they can walk along the outside of the vessels with little difficulty in order to make repairs. An ambitious nihili who proves its worth might eventually become the captain of its own Corpse Fleet ship.

Rumors speak of a cult of nihilis in the fringes of the Vast who have discovered a small tear in reality that opens up onto the Negative Energy Plane. Calling it a “dark star,” these nihilis eject corpses (usually of victims they have killed) into the surrounding vacuum as sacrifices; some of these bodies are animated as nihilis who immediately attain honored positions in the cult, as they preach of sinister whispers from beyond the portal that encourage this gruesome form of reproduction. When one of these nihilis is destroyed, its remaining flesh is almost instantly flensed from its body, leaving a skeleton marked with glowing blue runes that are difficult for living creatures to focus on—attempting to do so results in blurred vision and nosebleeds. The few mystics who have studied these runes (usually through sketches or eyewitness descriptions) have yet to decipher their meaning. A small handful of rune-marked bones are kept in smoked-glass cases inside secure vaults by a few arcane research bases within the Pact Worlds.

No one knows for certain whether the nihilis who worship this “dark star” are venerating a shadowy entity or are suffering from some unknown kind of madness. However, travelers who survive passing through this region return with tales of huge masses of floating corpses forming a ring around a cloud of ebony particles that seems to absorb all light.

Nuar Enforcer

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 4 XP: 1,200

N Medium monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +0 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 52

EAC: 18 KAC: 20

Fort: +6 Ref: +4 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 35 ft.

Melee: tactical cryopike +12 (1d8+11 C) or horn +12 (1d6+11 P)

Ranged: frostbite-class zero rifle +9 (1d8+4 C; critical staggered [DC 13]) or frag grenade II +9 (explode [15ft., 2d6 P, DC 13])

Offensive Abilities: gore, fighting styles (hit-and-run), knockdown

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +0 Con: +3 Wis: +1 Int: +1 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +15, Intimidate +10, Survival +10

Languages: Common, Orc

Gear: lashunta ringwear II, maze-core frostbite-class zero rifle and tactical cryopike with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each), frag grenades II (3)

Ecology

Environment: any (Absalom Station)

Organization: solitary, pair, or brute squad (3–6)

Special Abilities

Gore (Ex) A nuar can charge without taking the normal charge penalties to the attack roll or its AC. If the nuar has another ability that allows it to charge without taking these penalties (such as the charge attack ability from the soldier’s blitz attack fighting style), the nuar also gains the ability to charge through difficult terrain.

Knockdown (Ex) When a nuar enforcer scores a critical hit with a melee weapon that has no other critical effects, the attack gains the knockdown critical effect.

Maze Mind (Ex) Nuars have a naturally strong sense of direction and an instinctive understanding of complex patterns. As a result, they very rarely get lost. A nuar can attempt a special level-based Wisdom check (1d20 + CR or level + Wisdom bonus) instead of using his total bonus in the Piloting skill to navigate or his total bonus in the Survival skill for orienteering.

Description

Nuars are pale, minotaur-like creatures with formidable frames and roughly bovine faces, hooves, and horns. Their skin and hair range in coloration from snow white to cream, light gray, or tan, with eyes that are generally pink or red, though they much more rarely may be bright blue, green, or yellow. Nuars’ bestial appearance often convinces others that the creatures are slow-witted and simple, but this is far from the truth.

Nuars trace their origins to lost Golarion, claiming they are a race distinct from the larger and less intelligent race of common minotaurs. Their accepted history states they existed on Absalom Station, and before that in the ancient city of Absalom, long before the Gap. With no firm scholarship to rely on, nuars have built a new mythology and history by borrowing elements from numerous other species and faiths.

Nuars have a strong appreciation for the culture of orcs and half-orcs, and often follow orc conventions and traditions that don’t interfere with their endeavors in invention and innovation. They are drawn to technology and commonly worship Triune or Yaraesa, with their most senior priests also serving as skilled designers, engineers, and inventors.

Nuars are not a numerous race, even on their declared home of Absalom Station. They have no known major settlements of their own, though rumors persist of technologically advanced labyrinths hidden deep within asteroids of the Diaspora. Beyond Absalom Station, they are most often found on exploratory ships, as their combination of impressive physiques, keen intellects, and urges to research and create serve them well. However, as nuars age, they also tend to want to establish roots, often returning to Absalom Station to start a family or build a community.

A typical nuar stands between 7 and 7-1/2 feet tall and weighs about 300 pounds.

The nuars’ natural grasp of complex patterns and shifting connections has allowed them to develop special kinds of multifunctional devices using an adjustable component known as a maze-core. A maze-core device acts as two different pieces of equipment, though it can function as only one of the two at any given time. Only powered or technological equipment can be built as maze-core devices, and the items must be melee weapons, small arms, longarms, heavy weapons, computers, or technological devices.

To create a maze-core device, select two pieces of equipment. The maze-core device has a bulk equal to that of the bulkiest of the two items + 1, and a cost equal to the most expensive of the two items + 1-1/2 times the cost of the less expensive item. When determining the maze-core equipment’s hardness and Hit Points, treat it as having the higher level of the two items, but for all other calculations, each item retains its own item level. If both items require the same kind of ammunition or power (such as a battery), they share a single battery of the highest capacity either device uses.

Changing a piece of maze-core equipment to function as the alternate piece of equipment is a swift action.

Nuar Specialist

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

LN Medium monstrous (humanoid)

Init.: +0 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +16

Defense

HP: 117

EAC: 19 KAC: 20

Fort: +9 Ref: +9 Will: +9

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: buzzblade dueling sword +17 (2d6+10 S) or horn +17 (1d12+10 P)

Ranged: aphelion laser pistol +15 (3d4+8 F; critical burn 1d4) or frag grenade III +15 (explode [15 ft., 4d6 P, DC 18])

Offensive Abilities: gore, knockdown, overload (DC 18), target tracking

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +0 Con: +2 Wis: +4 Int: +6 Cha: +1

Skills: Athletics +16, Bluff +16, Computers +21, Engineering +21, Physical Science +21

Languages: Common, Orc

Gear: advanced lashunta tempweave (black force field [10 HP]), maze-core aphelion laser pistol and buzzblade dueling sword with 2 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each), frag grenades III (4), detonators (4)

Ecology

Environment: any (Absalom Station)

Organization: solitary

Special Abilities

Gore (Ex) A nuar can charge without taking the normal charge penalties to the attack roll or its AC. If the nuar has another ability that allows it to charge without taking these penalties (such as the charge attack ability from the soldier’s blitz attack fighting style), the nuar also gains the ability to charge through difficult terrain.

Maze Mind (Ex) Nuars have a naturally strong sense of direction and an instinctive understanding of complex patterns. As a result, they very rarely get lost. A nuar can attempt a special level-based Wisdom check (1d20 + CR or level + Wisdom bonus) instead of using his total bonus in the Piloting skill to navigate or his total bonus in the Survival skill for orienteering.

Description

Nuars are pale, minotaur-like creatures with formidable frames and roughly bovine faces, hooves, and horns. Their skin and hair range in coloration from snow white to cream, light gray, or tan, with eyes that are generally pink or red, though they much more rarely may be bright blue, green, or yellow. Nuars’ bestial appearance often convinces others that the creatures are slow-witted and simple, but this is far from the truth.

Nuars trace their origins to lost Golarion, claiming they are a race distinct from the larger and less intelligent race of common minotaurs. Their accepted history states they existed on Absalom Station, and before that in the ancient city of Absalom, long before the Gap. With no firm scholarship to rely on, nuars have built a new mythology and history by borrowing elements from numerous other species and faiths.

Nuars have a strong appreciation for the culture of orcs and half-orcs, and often follow orc conventions and traditions that don’t interfere with their endeavors in invention and innovation. They are drawn to technology and commonly worship Triune or Yaraesa, with their most senior priests also serving as skilled designers, engineers, and inventors.

Nuars are not a numerous race, even on their declared home of Absalom Station. They have no known major settlements of their own, though rumors persist of technologically advanced labyrinths hidden deep within asteroids of the Diaspora. Beyond Absalom Station, they are most often found on exploratory ships, as their combination of impressive physiques, keen intellects, and urges to research and create serve them well. However, as nuars age, they also tend to want to establish roots, often returning to Absalom Station to start a family or build a community.

A typical nuar stands between 7 and 7-1/2 feet tall and weighs about 300 pounds.

The nuars’ natural grasp of complex patterns and shifting connections has allowed them to develop special kinds of multifunctional devices using an adjustable component known as a maze-core. A maze-core device acts as two different pieces of equipment, though it can function as only one of the two at any given time. Only powered or technological equipment can be built as maze-core devices, and the items must be melee weapons, small arms, longarms, heavy weapons, computers, or technological devices.

To create a maze-core device, select two pieces of equipment. The maze-core device has a bulk equal to that of the bulkiest of the two items + 1, and a cost equal to the most expensive of the two items + 1-1/2 times the cost of the less expensive item. When determining the maze-core equipment’s hardness and Hit Points, treat it as having the higher level of the two items, but for all other calculations, each item retains its own item level. If both items require the same kind of ammunition or power (such as a battery), they share a single battery of the highest capacity either device uses.

Changing a piece of maze-core equipment to function as the alternate piece of equipment is a swift action.

Observer-Class Security Robot

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 1 XP: 400

N Small construct (technological)

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +5

Defense

HP: 17

EAC: 14 KAC: 15

Fort: +1 Ref: +1 Will: -1

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 30 ft. (Ex, average)

Melee: slam +6 (1d6+3 B)

Ranged: integrated pulsecaster pistol +9 (1d4+1 E nonlethal), or stickybomb grenade I +9 (explode [10 ft., entangled 2d4 rounds, DC 10])

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +4 Con:Wis: +0 Int: +1 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +10, Athletics +5, Computers +5

Languages: Common

Gear: pulsecaster pistol with 2 batteries (20 charges each), stickybomb grenades I (2)

Ecology

Environment: any urban

Organization: solitary or fleet (2–5)

Special Abilities

Exigency (Ex) An observer-class security robot can expend a large store of energy to temporarily increase its processing power and attempt to avoid an attack. Once per day, it can reroll a failed Reflex saving throw with a +10 circumstance bonus.

Integrated Weapons (Ex)

Description

Security robots come in a wide variety of makes and models, with a near-endless variety of customizations based on both the manufacturer and the aesthetics and needs of the consumer. Crafted with advanced user interfaces mimicking moderate intelligence, but without any of the emotions, unpredictability, or bias of a true AI or sentient creature, security bots are an eminently practical, reasonable solution to a wide variety of security needs. Unlike full-on military models, security robots usually come preprogrammed with certain fail-safes preventing them from engaging in violence beyond what’s necessary for the protection of their assigned population or property, making them a go-to option for police forces, corporations, and even wealthy individuals looking for peace of mind.

One of the cheapest and most common types of security robot is the observer. Observer-class bots are usually small, flying robots designed primarily to record and report specific unsavory activities for later review by their owners, though they are also equipped to fend off minor threats. Whether buzzing through the access ducts of secure facilities or hovering over crowded marketplaces, observers are nearly ubiquitous in some advanced settlements. On Absalom Station, the most prominent brand is AbadarCorp’s VizAll, a flying orb with gentle contours designed to put citizens at ease, with a central eye, stubby fins, and relentlessly cheerful speech patterns. Aballon’s Sunward Corporation produces the more disconcerting Arbitron, whose insectile form mimics those of the resident anacites, while Triaxus’s Bluescale Industries crafts theirs to resemble tiny, mechanical drakes. Regardless of their shape, however, observers are known for their convenience, but they are infamous for their limited nuance—a problem for owners who forget their own security passphrase. Some of the cheapest models also have faulty programming that causes them to develop personality quirks, making a particular bot act especially aggressive, friendly, or even dejected.

Patrol-class security robots are more humanoid in shape, standing about 6 feet tall with integrated armaments that keep the robots’ limbs free to apprehend offenders and engage in close combat. Given their deadlier weaponry and tougher armor plating, patrol-class security robots (sometimes simply called “patrol bots”) are more regulated in their sale and use. They are found mostly in large space stations and corporate facilities under government or syndicate control. As with observer-class robots, these models run the gamut from four-armed Idaran Peacekeepers to the artistic Castrovelian Linewalkers that guard against dangerous jungle beasts, yet the overwhelming industry leader is AbadarCorp’s Town Guard series. With blank, circular faces of glass or glowing energy and cleanly contoured limbs capable of folding up for easy storage, AbadarCorp’s patrol bot is a triumph of industrial design and defense. This model’s reputation has been further boosted due to the fact that it’s the only model of patrol bot currently used by Absalom Station’s government, with many going straight into service from the corporation’s manufactories in the Spike.

Unfortunately, not all security bots end up working for law-abiding corporations or state governments. Various planets in the Pact Worlds system have their own rules about who is or is not licensed to own a security robot, and the Pact Worlds government generally finds it easier to look the other way than to get embroiled in the contentious issues of rights-to- weapons and planetary sovereignty. As a result, it’s not difficult for individuals to purchase security robots entirely unregulated on the black market, albeit at a high cost. In cases where a world outlaws such sales, these models are usually formerly legal models that have been stolen and cracked by hacker gangs, while in other places corporations quietly sell to known criminal enterprises without asking questions. Such security robots are sometimes marked by their owners to show their “allegiance”—they might be painted with gang symbols or have their heads replaced with disturbing mannequin busts. Other groups maintain their robots’ official appearances, the better to carry out kidnappings and extortion. Because of this, passersby occasionally stumble across pitched firefights between squads of similar-looking security robots. Those who wish to get involved must be careful to identify each side’s master, as they could find themselves unintentionally taking sides in a gang war.

Though both observer and patrol models have safeguards to protect against it, glitches can occasionally develop in a security robot’s firmware, often the result of massive damage sustained during a firefight or improper diagnostics after such an altercation. In such cases, the glitch can override the bot’s usual baselevel programming regarding tiers of force and the logic of conflict escalation, or even its protocol to protect the innocent. This can result in a bloody rampage, with the robot either going berserk over perceived violation of nonexistent laws, or technically following the law but executing lethal punishment for even the smallest infraction. Even worse, an infected patrol bot’s nanites can carry its corrupted code like a virus, turning other security robots rogue. When this occurs, manufacturers like AbadarCorp are usually quick to hire discreet “contractors” to deal with the menace (as maintaining their own strike-and-disassembly force would publicly acknowledge the threat).

Occult Zombie

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 1 XP: 400

NE Medium undead

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +5

Defense

HP: 24

EAC: 11 KAC: 13

Fort: +3 Ref: +3 Will: +3

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: slam +8 (1d6+5 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +4 Dex: +2 Con:Wis: +1 Int:Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +10

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, pack (3–12), or horde (13+)

Special Abilities

Staggered (Ex) An occult zombie is always considered staggered and can never take more than a single move or standard action in a round. It can’t take full actions.

Description

The most commonly encountered undead in the galaxy are the mindless minions of greater undead (such as necrovites and vampires) or of powerful spellcasters (including both mystics and technomancers of all races). As creatures with no motivations of their own, undead minions can also be found leaderless in the remains of ruined structures on planetary surfaces, adrift in derelict spacecraft, and even floating through the void of space. Whether encountered as servants of a mastermind who coordinates their movements or as a mindless threat in the wake of a cataclysmic disaster, undead minions are always a force to be reckoned with and a scourge to the living.

Though there are countless types of mindless undead who serve as minions, the most common are cybernetic zombies, occult zombies, and skeletal undead. Both occult zombies and skeletal undead are animated by magical or supernatural forces and created either in dark necromantic rituals (including the

spell) or by strange and mysterious reactions between the Material and Negative Energy Planes. Cybernetic zombies, on the other hand, arise as the result of technological implants that continue to function after their hosts have died, causing the body to act in a sad, shambling imitation of real life. Without control from an external force, these three kinds of undead simply go through the motions of their former lives, without reason, purpose, or the promise of an end to their miserable existences.

In the Pact Worlds, most undead hail from the dead world of Eox and were created by the bone sages, though zombies and skeletal creatures are also found among the wreckage of ancient battlefields on Akiton and the enigmatic, alien structures on Aucturn. In contrast, cybernetic zombies are most often found on worlds with high levels of technological development, such as Aballon, Castrovel, and Verces.

Those cultists of Urgathoa who see undeath as the pinnacle of being surround themselves with undead minions, both to use their abilities to terrorize innocent folk and to study their physiology in order to become undead themselves. While these worshipers would prefer to become more intelligent undead creatures, they often find that their fate is to rise up as a skeleton or zombie. Priests of Pharasma, on the other hand, often go out of their way to destroy all undead creatures, especially their mindless minions.

Undead minions can be formed from the corpses of any type of creature, though most of those appearing in folklore from across the galaxy are animated versions of whatever culture is telling the tale. Humanoids tell of ambulatory corpses rising from their ritual burial grounds, while aberrations, dragons, and magical beasts have their own legends of mindless dead of their own species returning to plague the living. Whatever the undead creatures’ original form, they often maintain natural attacks and other physical characteristics of their living counterparts even in undeath, though their mindless nature means they lose the ability to carry out complex tactics, conduct intricate or detailed tasks, and cast spells or take other mentally engaging actions. Yet the creatures’ mindlessness makes them all the more frightening and threatening, as they can be neither reasoned with nor cowed.

Use the following template grafts to create other versions of the undead minions presented here.

Odheo

Source: Starfinder #8: Escape from the Prison Moon

CR: 1 XP: 400

N Tiny vermin

Init.: +4 Senses: blindsense (scent) 60 ft., darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +5

Defense

HP: 17

EAC: 11 KAC: 13

Fort: +5 Ref: +3 Will: +1

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., climb 30 ft.

Melee: bite +8 (1d3+3 S) or harpoon tongue +8 (1d6+1 P)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +4 Con: +1 Wis: +0 Int:Cha: -2

Skills: Acrobatics +5, Athletics +5 (+13 to climb), Stealth +10

Ecology

Environment: any underground or urban

Organization: solitary or infestation (4–20)

Special Abilities

Blood Explosion (Ex) When an odheo dies, it pops in a mess of ingested blood and viscous slime. A creature adjacent to the odheo must succeed at a DC 10 Fortitude saving throw or become sickened for 1d4 rounds, after which that creature takes a –2 penalty to saving throws against disease for the next 24 hours. A creature that is already sickened when it fails this saving throw becomes nauseated for 1d4 rounds instead. Odheos are immune to the effects of this ability.

Evasive (Ex) When a creature attempts a melee or ranged attack against an odheo and misses, the odheo can take a guarded step as a reaction.

Description

Odheos are one of the galaxy’s strongest cases for following proper biocontainment procedures. Originally from Gjor III, these slimy vermin have spread to thousands of space stations, having been unwittingly carried across the galaxy by careless couriers or merchants. Odheos prefer to live in artificial environments, limiting their destruction of natural ecosystems, but this preference is cold comfort to those urban and station residents they torment.

An odheo is a bold pest, openly jabbing creatures with its long tongue and then escaping back into hiding before victims can retaliate. They live in vents or engineering tunnels and breed rapidly, making them difficult to remove once they have infested an area. They are also impossible to eat, exploding into a rancid mix of gore and slime when killed, rendering them useless for anything other than aggravation.

Odheos evolved from an arboreal ancestor that used its long tongue to attach to creatures that passed by. The odheo’s ten chitinous legs and gripping feet still make it extremely adept at climbing almost any surface. Unlike its ancestors, though, an odheo uses its harpoon tongue as its main method of feeding, only moving in to bite creatures that are helpless or dead.

Oma

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 16 XP: 76,800

N Colossal magical (beast)

Init.: +8 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +28

Defense

HP: 285

EAC: 30 KAC: 31

Fort: +16 Ref: +16 Will: +19

Offense

Speed: fly 60 ft. (Su, clumsy)

Melee: tail slap +27 (6d8+19 B) or bite +27 (6d6+19 P plus swallow whole)

Ranged: electrical discharge +29 (6d4+16 E; critical overload [DC 24])

Offensive Abilities: swallow whole (5d4+16 E, EAC 30, KAC 27, 71 HP)

Spells Known: (CL 16th)

Statistics

Str: +3 Dex: +3 Con: +7 Wis: +10 Int: +0 Cha: +5

Skills: Acrobatics +33 (+25 when flying), Piloting +33, Sense Motive +28

Languages: starsong (can’t speak any language)

Ecology

Environment: any vacuum or gas giant

Organization: solitary, pair, or pod (3–5)

Special Abilities

Cavatina (Su) Once per day as a move action, an oma can sing a telepathic song that either encourages its friends or dispirits its foes. The oma can grant a +2 morale bonus to ability checks, attack rolls, and skill checks to all allies within 60 feet. Alternatively, the oma can cause all enemies within 60 feet who fail DC 24 Will saving throws to take a –2 penalty to ability checks, attack rolls, and skill checks. This bonus or penalty lasts for 8 rounds.

Electrical Discharge (Ex) An oma can strike foes with a blast of electrical energy that has a range increment of 120 feet. When an oma scores a critical hit with its electric discharge, the target must succeed at a DC 24 Reflex save or technological items held by the target are unusable and do not provide any benefit to their wielder for 1 minute.

Description

Oma are vast creatures, often called “space whales,” that travel endlessly through the inky void. They magically project electromagnetic fields that shield them from the effects of the vacuum as well as from the particulate rings and dense atmospheres of the gas giants in which they usually feed, extracting energy and nutrients with their energy baleen. Oma are most often seen traveling alone, though there are regions of the Pact Worlds system where pods of oma are known to migrate together on a particular, if mysterious, schedule. Rarely, massive numbers of oma gather in the rings of a planet and put on an incredible show, their energy fields intermingling and reacting with local gases to light up swaths of space in a multicolored spectacle. A typical oma is 150 feet long and weighs 250 tons.

The most commonly known—and least understood—feature of oma is their starsong: a haunting telepathic melody that can be perceived thousands of miles away, even across the void of space. While most describe starsong as slow, mournful, and crooning, none ever agree on the finer details of a particular oma song, which suggests that each listener hears something different. Attempts to decipher concrete meaning from these tonal poems have so far eluded even the most brilliant magic and linguistics experts, as the oma speak in riddles that even they don’t always appear to understand. Scholars and cryptolinguists among the glowing (and completely unrelated) poet-whales of Triaxus’s arctic seas claim that the patterns represent a surprisingly complete oral history of the universe, albeit a highly stylized and nonchronological version. Whatever the content of the songs, even the saltiest of spacefarers can become tearily nostalgic when they recall their first experience hearing the haunting sound in the silence between worlds.

Most reported interactions with oma have affirmed their docile nature, and many experienced spacefarers believe that the titanic creatures have a benevolent streak and that sighting one is a sign of good luck and favorable trade ahead. More than one crew of a disabled starship has reported being found by a passing oma, which then herded the ship back to civilized space. Once its temporary charges are safe again among their kind, the oma bids farewell with slow somersaults and cryptic starsong. However, those few that have attempted to hunt oma for sport have found them more than capable of defending themselves; the massive beasts can unleash a targeted burst of energy that disables most modern starship power cores. This has not gone unnoticed by various governments, who make periodic (and so far unsuccessful) attempts to reverse engineer and weaponize this ability. Oma are also capable of swallowing small starships (such as fighters and interceptors) whole; some do it accidentally as they feed, but most only when provoked.

Orocoran Ichor Lord

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 9 XP: 6,400

CE Medium aberration

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +17

Defense

HP: 120 RP: 1

EAC: 21 KAC: 22

Fort: +8 Ref: +8 Will: +14 (+16 vs. mind-affecting effects)

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: proboscis +15 (3d4+9 P; critical bleed 1d6)

Ranged: projectile vomit +17 (2d6+9 A plus hallucinate)

Offensive Abilities: None

Spells Known: (CL 9th)

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +4 Con: +3 Wis: +6 Int: +2 Cha: +3

Skills: Intimidate +22, Mysticism +22, Sense Motive +17

Languages: Aklo, Common (can’t speak any language); limited telepathy 60 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any (Aucturn)

Organization: solitary or congregation (1 ichor lord plus 10–20 orocorans)

Special Abilities

Hallucinate (Ex) An orocoran’s stomach fluids are laced with the narcotic black ichor of Aucturn. A creature hit with the orocoran’s projectile vomit must succeed at a DC 16 Will save or be confused (as per confusion) for 1d4 rounds.

Projectile Vomit (Ex)

Description

Native to Aucturn, orocorans maybe even predate the coming of the cults of the Elder Mythos and the Dominion of the Black, and they remain one of their world’s most populous intelligent races. Orocorans are parasites that prey on the living planet, seeking out the pulsing veins of black ichor that run beneath parts of Aucturn’s surface, drawing the liquid out with their mosquito-like proboscises. In addition to feeding the orocorans, these eldritch fluids also act as a powerful narcotic, filling the orocorans with euphoric hallucinations. Orocorans call this dream state “womb mind,” and they believe that it allows them to commune directly with the gestating consciousness of the planet itself. Indeed, there may be some truth to this idea, as even those orocorans not actively dreaming can use the ichor lingering in their systems to tap into this mystical consciousness and receive vague prophetic advice regarding their actions. Orocorans can usually be found wherever the veins of ichor flow thickest, either defending their hallucinogenic watering hole or simply lying sprawled in the grips of drug-induced stupors. When not ichor dreaming, orocorans are irritable and unpredictable, in constant lowgrade pain from withdrawal symptoms. Slothful by nature, orocorans have little desire to create civilization, and they generally do so only when forced into it by more powerful races or rare orocoran individuals called ichor lords.

While most orocorans have their higher faculties rotted out by the unending hunger of addiction, barely even using their telepathy to communicate, perhaps one in a thousand finds that the ichor supercharges its intellectual capacities, giving it not only a greater degree of cunning and intelligence but enhanced magical powers. These ichor lords believe themselves to be direct conduits to the mind of the sleeping planet, something between priests and avatars, and consider it their divine responsibility to organize their kin and rule over them in pursuit of the dreaming Aucturn’s goals. What exactly these goals might be varies wildly from lord to lord, but they somehow always seem to involve securing the ichor lord’s power and comfort, along with the crafting of elegant monasteries or massive fortresses to guard the local supply of ichor. These warlord-oracles control their fellows through both brute magical power and monopolization of the planet’s fluids, but the need for the ichor to be relatively fresh means that most of these makeshift kingdoms extend only as far as the local vein runs, their influence tapering as soon as the vein dives too far underground to be mined effectively. Regardless of the size of their holdings, all ichor lords and their subjects recognize the authority of the mysterious entity called Carsai the King. Though Carsai’s true nature has never been established, most orocorans believe him to be the greatest ichor lord and the ultimate prophet of their slumbering god, referring to him as the First Dreamer.

Though capable of using other races’ technology—frequently armed for battle and used as shock troops by ichor lords or more organized races—threatened orocorans generally default to spewing their madness-inducing stomach fluids onto enemies, letting the fluids rot their targets’ minds, and then moving in to exsanguinate them with their proboscises. While orocorans are nearly 6 feet tall when standing upright, they prefer to run on all fours, and they usually weigh around 150 pounds. Orocorans have no gender or designated reproductive organs, and mating involves two participants piercing each other’s torsos with their proboscises to share genetic information and become pregnant. These individuals lay clutches of fertilized eggs in ichor-filled pockets gouged out of the planet’s skin, and then they abandon their young completely.

Orocoran

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

CE Medium aberration

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +13

Defense

HP: 93 RP: 1

EAC: 18 KAC: 20

Fort: +8 Ref: +8 Will: +7 (+9 vs. mind-affecting effects)

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: proboscis +13 (1d8+6 P; critical bleed 1d6)

Ranged: projectile vomit +16 (1d10+6 A plus hallucinate)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +5 Con: +3 Wis: +1 Int: -1 Cha: +2

Skills: Mysticism +13, Stealth +18, Survival +13

Languages: Aklo (can’t speak any language); limited telepathy 60 ft.

Ecology

Environment: any (Aucturn)

Organization: solitary, brood (2–9), or congregation (10–20 orocorans plus 1 ichor lord)

Special Abilities

Hallucinate (Ex) An orocoran’s stomach fluids are laced with the narcotic black ichor of Aucturn. A creature hit with the orocoran’s projectile vomit must succeed at a DC 16 Will save or be confused (as per confusion) for 1d4 rounds.

Projectile Vomit (Ex)

Description

Native to Aucturn, orocorans maybe even predate the coming of the cults of the Elder Mythos and the Dominion of the Black, and they remain one of their world’s most populous intelligent races. Orocorans are parasites that prey on the living planet, seeking out the pulsing veins of black ichor that run beneath parts of Aucturn’s surface, drawing the liquid out with their mosquito-like proboscises. In addition to feeding the orocorans, these eldritch fluids also act as a powerful narcotic, filling the orocorans with euphoric hallucinations. Orocorans call this dream state “womb mind,” and they believe that it allows them to commune directly with the gestating consciousness of the planet itself. Indeed, there may be some truth to this idea, as even those orocorans not actively dreaming can use the ichor lingering in their systems to tap into this mystical consciousness and receive vague prophetic advice regarding their actions. Orocorans can usually be found wherever the veins of ichor flow thickest, either defending their hallucinogenic watering hole or simply lying sprawled in the grips of drug-induced stupors. When not ichor dreaming, orocorans are irritable and unpredictable, in constant lowgrade pain from withdrawal symptoms. Slothful by nature, orocorans have little desire to create civilization, and they generally do so only when forced into it by more powerful races or rare orocoran individuals called ichor lords.

While most orocorans have their higher faculties rotted out by the unending hunger of addiction, barely even using their telepathy to communicate, perhaps one in a thousand finds that the ichor supercharges its intellectual capacities, giving it not only a greater degree of cunning and intelligence but enhanced magical powers. These ichor lords believe themselves to be direct conduits to the mind of the sleeping planet, something between priests and avatars, and consider it their divine responsibility to organize their kin and rule over them in pursuit of the dreaming Aucturn’s goals. What exactly these goals might be varies wildly from lord to lord, but they somehow always seem to involve securing the ichor lord’s power and comfort, along with the crafting of elegant monasteries or massive fortresses to guard the local supply of ichor. These warlord-oracles control their fellows through both brute magical power and monopolization of the planet’s fluids, but the need for the ichor to be relatively fresh means that most of these makeshift kingdoms extend only as far as the local vein runs, their influence tapering as soon as the vein dives too far underground to be mined effectively. Regardless of the size of their holdings, all ichor lords and their subjects recognize the authority of the mysterious entity called Carsai the King. Though Carsai’s true nature has never been established, most orocorans believe him to be the greatest ichor lord and the ultimate prophet of their slumbering god, referring to him as the First Dreamer.

Though capable of using other races’ technology—frequently armed for battle and used as shock troops by ichor lords or more organized races—threatened orocorans generally default to spewing their madness-inducing stomach fluids onto enemies, letting the fluids rot their targets’ minds, and then moving in to exsanguinate them with their proboscises. While orocorans are nearly 6 feet tall when standing upright, they prefer to run on all fours, and they usually weigh around 150 pounds. Orocorans have no gender or designated reproductive organs, and mating involves two participants piercing each other’s torsos with their proboscises to share genetic information and become pregnant. These individuals lay clutches of fertilized eggs in ichor-filled pockets gouged out of the planet’s skin, and then they abandon their young completely.

Paralith

Source: Starfinder #8: Escape from the Prison Moon

CR: 4 XP: 1,200

N Medium aberration

Init.: +1 Senses: blindsight (electromagnetic broadcast) 60 ft., sightless Perception: +15

Defense

HP: 52

EAC: 16 KAC: 18

Fort: +6 Ref: +6 Will: +5

Offense

Speed: 35 ft.

Melee: claw +12 (1d6+9 S plus ultraviolet infection)

Ranged: cylindrical lens pistol +9 (1d8+4 F; critical burn 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +1 Con: +3 Wis: +1 Int: +0 Cha: +0

Skills: Athletics +10 (+14 to jump), Intimidate +10

Languages: Paralithi

Gear: cylindrical lens pistol with 1 battery (20 charges)

Ecology

Environment: any forests or jungles

Organization: solitary, pair, or pack (3–15)

Special Abilities

Force Field Blindness (Ex) Force fields interfere with a paralith’s perception. A paralith takes a –4 penalty to attack rolls and Perception checks against a creature that has an active force field armor upgrade or energy shield gained from the mechanic trick of the same name.

Ultraviolet Infection (Su) A creature struck by a paralith’s melee attack must attempt a DC 13 Fortitude save. Failure means the wound becomes infected by ultraviolet light for 24 hours. An infected wound glows, dealing a –4 penalty (that doesn’t stack) to the victim’s Stealth checks. If another creature restores Hit Points to the infected victim using the Medicine skill, the creature administering the healing takes an amount of untyped damage equal to the number of Hit Points restored.

Description

A paralith is a hulking humanoid-shaped creature with broad claws and a thick blue hide. Its neck is short, and its horselike head has only one feature—a mouth with large, blunt teeth.

Where these creatures originally come from is unknown. They prefer hot jungles, though an individual paralith might venture into a civilized area. Such venturesome paraliths rarely cause trouble beyond their apparent inability to understand social mores, so they are more of a curiosity than a threat. Paraliths encountered in the jungle are much more aggressive and dangerous, traveling in packs and often found around ruined temples and monoliths.

Xenolinguists have yet to gather enough information to be able to understand and reproduce the Paralithi language. Even when they’re able to communicate with paraliths through magical means, conversations are difficult and confusing. Paraliths punctuate their sentences with seemingly random strings of numbers, the significance of which is still a mystery.

Patrol-Class Security Robot

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 4 XP: 1,200

N Medium construct (technological)

Init.: +5 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 52

EAC: 16 KAC: 18

Fort: +4 Ref: +4 Will: +1

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: slam +10 (1d6+7 B)

Ranged: integrated tactical arc emitter +13 (1d4+4 E)

Offensive Abilities: jolting arc

Statistics

Str: +3 Dex: +5 Con:Wis: +0 Int: +1 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +10, Computers +10, Intimidate +15

Languages: Common

Gear: tactical arc emitter with 2 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any urban

Organization: solitary, pair, or patrol (3–7)

Special Abilities

Integrated Weapons (Ex) A security robot’s weapons are integrated into its frame and can’t be disarmed.

Jolting Arc (Ex) Once every 1d4 rounds as a standard action, a patrol-class security robot can shoot an arc of electricity at up to four creatures within 40 feet (no two of which can be more than 30 feet apart). This arc deals 1d8 electricity damage to each target (Reflex DC 13 half).

Nanite Repair (Ex)

Description

Security robots come in a wide variety of makes and models, with a near-endless variety of customizations based on both the manufacturer and the aesthetics and needs of the consumer. Crafted with advanced user interfaces mimicking moderate intelligence, but without any of the emotions, unpredictability, or bias of a true AI or sentient creature, security bots are an eminently practical, reasonable solution to a wide variety of security needs. Unlike full-on military models, security robots usually come preprogrammed with certain fail-safes preventing them from engaging in violence beyond what’s necessary for the protection of their assigned population or property, making them a go-to option for police forces, corporations, and even wealthy individuals looking for peace of mind.

One of the cheapest and most common types of security robot is the observer. Observer-class bots are usually small, flying robots designed primarily to record and report specific unsavory activities for later review by their owners, though they are also equipped to fend off minor threats. Whether buzzing through the access ducts of secure facilities or hovering over crowded marketplaces, observers are nearly ubiquitous in some advanced settlements. On Absalom Station, the most prominent brand is AbadarCorp’s VizAll, a flying orb with gentle contours designed to put citizens at ease, with a central eye, stubby fins, and relentlessly cheerful speech patterns. Aballon’s Sunward Corporation produces the more disconcerting Arbitron, whose insectile form mimics those of the resident anacites, while Triaxus’s Bluescale Industries crafts theirs to resemble tiny, mechanical drakes. Regardless of their shape, however, observers are known for their convenience, but they are infamous for their limited nuance—a problem for owners who forget their own security passphrase. Some of the cheapest models also have faulty programming that causes them to develop personality quirks, making a particular bot act especially aggressive, friendly, or even dejected.

Patrol-class security robots are more humanoid in shape, standing about 6 feet tall with integrated armaments that keep the robots’ limbs free to apprehend offenders and engage in close combat. Given their deadlier weaponry and tougher armor plating, patrol-class security robots (sometimes simply called “patrol bots”) are more regulated in their sale and use. They are found mostly in large space stations and corporate facilities under government or syndicate control. As with observer-class robots, these models run the gamut from four-armed Idaran Peacekeepers to the artistic Castrovelian Linewalkers that guard against dangerous jungle beasts, yet the overwhelming industry leader is AbadarCorp’s Town Guard series. With blank, circular faces of glass or glowing energy and cleanly contoured limbs capable of folding up for easy storage, AbadarCorp’s patrol bot is a triumph of industrial design and defense. This model’s reputation has been further boosted due to the fact that it’s the only model of patrol bot currently used by Absalom Station’s government, with many going straight into service from the corporation’s manufactories in the Spike.

Unfortunately, not all security bots end up working for law-abiding corporations or state governments. Various planets in the Pact Worlds system have their own rules about who is or is not licensed to own a security robot, and the Pact Worlds government generally finds it easier to look the other way than to get embroiled in the contentious issues of rights-to- weapons and planetary sovereignty. As a result, it’s not difficult for individuals to purchase security robots entirely unregulated on the black market, albeit at a high cost. In cases where a world outlaws such sales, these models are usually formerly legal models that have been stolen and cracked by hacker gangs, while in other places corporations quietly sell to known criminal enterprises without asking questions. Such security robots are sometimes marked by their owners to show their “allegiance”—they might be painted with gang symbols or have their heads replaced with disturbing mannequin busts. Other groups maintain their robots’ official appearances, the better to carry out kidnappings and extortion. Because of this, passersby occasionally stumble across pitched firefights between squads of similar-looking security robots. Those who wish to get involved must be careful to identify each side’s master, as they could find themselves unintentionally taking sides in a gang war.

Though both observer and patrol models have safeguards to protect against it, glitches can occasionally develop in a security robot’s firmware, often the result of massive damage sustained during a firefight or improper diagnostics after such an altercation. In such cases, the glitch can override the bot’s usual baselevel programming regarding tiers of force and the logic of conflict escalation, or even its protocol to protect the innocent. This can result in a bloody rampage, with the robot either going berserk over perceived violation of nonexistent laws, or technically following the law but executing lethal punishment for even the smallest infraction. Even worse, an infected patrol bot’s nanites can carry its corrupted code like a virus, turning other security robots rogue. When this occurs, manufacturers like AbadarCorp are usually quick to hire discreet “contractors” to deal with the menace (as maintaining their own strike-and-disassembly force would publicly acknowledge the threat).

Radiation Drake

Source: Starfinder #8: Escape from the Prison Moon

CR: 9 XP: 6,400

CE Large dragon

Init.: +4 Senses: darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Perception: +17

Defense

HP: 145

EAC: 22 KAC: 24

Fort: +13 Ref: +13 Will: +10

Offense

Speed: 30 ft., fly 60 ft. (Ex, average)

Melee: bite +22 (2d10+15 P plus radiation exposure)

Ranged: atomic bolt +19 (3d10+3 F plus radiation exposure; critical burn 2d6)

Offensive Abilities: breath weapon (30-ft. cone, 6d10 F plus radiation exposure, Reflex DC 16 half, usable every 1d6 rounds)

Statistics

Str: +6 Dex: +4 Con: +3 Wis: +2 Int: -2 Cha: +0

Skills: Acrobatics +17, Intimidate +22, Survival +17

Languages: Draconic

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or rad (3–9)

Special Abilities

Atomic Bolt (Ex) A radiation drake’s atomic bolt has a range increment of 60 feet.

Radiation Exposure (Ex) A creature that takes Hit Point damage from the radiation drake’s attacks is exposed to medium radiation. This radiation bypasses armor environmental protections.

Description

Rebuilt

Source: Starfinder #4: The Ruined Clouds

CR: 7 XP: 3,200

CN Medium aberration

Init.: +2 Senses: darkvision 60 ft. Perception: +14

Defense

HP: 105

EAC: 19 KAC: 21

Fort: +9 Ref: +9 Will: +8, +4 vs. pain effects

Offense

Speed: 15 ft.

Melee: slam +17 (2d6+12 B)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +5 Dex: +2 Con: +4 Wis: +0 Int: -2 Cha: -2

Skills: Acrobatics +14, Athletics +19, Intimidate +14, Survival +19

Languages: Vulgar Kishaleen (can't speak)

Ecology

Environment: any ruins (Nejeor VI)

Organization: solitary or pair

Special Abilities

Unworkable Extremities (Ex) A rebuilt can neither wield weapons nor use items that require an action to activate.

Description

Modern medical equipment, like any technology, can malfunction, sometimes resulting in further injury to a patient or even a fatality. Rarer still is the catastrophic glitch that results in a fate worse than death. The tortured monstrosities known as rebuilt are created when a technological medical procedure goes horribly awry, irreparably fracturing the victim’s genetic code and reshaping the patient’s body into something that barely resembles its previous form.

Creatures that have been rebuilt in this way have limbs that jut in odd directions, and their flesh can be turned inside out, exposing misshapen organs to the air. Much of a rebuilt’s biology doesn’t function as it did for its previous form. Its eyeballs might serve as its pulmonary organs, while it sees out of its toenails. In addition, because of its perpetual agony and the rearrangement of its physiology, a rebuilt can speak only in tortured moans and screams. Strangely, this reshaping doesn’t make a rebuilt more susceptible to damage; pain effects pale in comparison to its constant agony, and its often-ossified flesh protects it from mundane harm.

A rebuilt has no capacity for higher reasoning, and it lashes out at anything in its way with ruinously transformed limbs.

Rebuilt are very rare, as horrified hospital personnel usually euthanize such unfortunates as soon as they arise. They mostly appear in ruined areas where medical equipment has been left unattended or in places that are exposed to high doses of radiation or mystical forces.

Reptoid Master

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 6 XP: 2,400

LE Medium humanoid (reptoid)

Init.: +0 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +13

Defense

HP: 77 RP: 4

EAC: 16 KAC: 18

Fort: +5 Ref: +5 Will: +11, +2 vs. mind-affecting effects and poisons

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: claw +12 (1d6+8 S)

Ranged: corona laser pistol +10 (2d4+6 F; critical burn 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: echoes of obedience, forced amity (DC 16), inexplicable commands

Spells Known: Known

Statistics

Str: +2 Dex: +0 Con: +1 Wis: +3 Int: +1 Cha: +5

Skills: Bluff +18, Diplomacy +18, Disguise +13, Sense Motive +13

Languages: Common, Reptoid, Vercite

Gear: kasatha microcord II, corona laser pistol with 2 highcapacity batteries (40 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or cabal (1 plus 3–8 reptoids)

Description

Reptoids are masters of disguise and deception, who use their shapechanging abilities to infiltrate countless other societies, impersonating influential individuals and seeking positions of power within their target culture. The number of reptoids hidden within any given society is unknown, as in addition to their exceptional espionage and infiltration skills, the creatures also have psychic magic that allows them to cover their tracks and ensure cooperation from their enemies.

The limited nature of the reptoids’ shapechanging ability means an individual typically holds only one alias at a time and undertakes the process of changing its cover only if that identity has been compromised. In some cases, reptoids work behind the scenes to engineer “mysterious accidents” that allow them to discard problematic identities and assume new ones, and some conspiracy theorists or counterespionage officials tend to view high-profile deaths as signs of potential reptoid activity—either covert assassinations by the creatures, or staged deaths to cover for new identities. Reptoids are known to spend years in their assumed forms; some spend more of their lives as other creatures than in their natural forms.

Reptoid masters are the masterminds behind the race’s plots and infiltration, appearing rarely even in rumors and even less commonly encountered in the flesh. Reptoid masters command much more powerful domination magic than typical reptoids, ensuring their plots and identities remain hidden, and they are believed to be the leaders of this enigmatic race, though how they are chosen or made remains a mystery. No one in the Pact Worlds knows whether reptoid masters are the first to infiltrate a society and remain so effectively hidden that they are never uncovered, if they arrive on a planet only after other reptoids have established a power base, or if they remain distant from their kin and simply pull strings from some secure command center. This command center could be virtually anywhere in the galaxy—with some theories pointing to Absalom Station itself.

As might be expected, reptoids are secretive about the end goals of their infiltrations, and when under extreme duress, they choose to die rather than reveal information about their home world or race. Some posit they are weakening target societies in preparation for eventual invasion, while others argue they may already hold complete control, and thus have no need for an invasion, preferring to live like parasites within a host society.

Reptoid

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 1 XP: 400

LE Medium humanoid (reptoid)

Init.: +0 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +5

Defense

HP: 16

EAC: 11 KAC: 12

Fort: +1 Ref: +1 Will: +6, +2 vs. mind-affecting effects and poisons

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: claw +4 (1d4+2 S)

Ranged: azimuth laser pistol +2 (1d4+1 F; critical burn 1d4)

Offensive Abilities: None

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +0 Con: -1 Wis: +1 Int: +2 Cha: +4

Skills: Bluff +10, Diplomacy +10, Disguise +5, Sense Motive +5

Languages: Common, Reptoid, Vercite

Gear: second skin, azimuth laser pistol with 2 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any

Organization: solitary, pair, or cabal (3–8 plus 1 reptoid master)

Description

Reptoids are masters of disguise and deception, who use their shapechanging abilities to infiltrate countless other societies, impersonating influential individuals and seeking positions of power within their target culture. The number of reptoids hidden within any given society is unknown, as in addition to their exceptional espionage and infiltration skills, the creatures also have psychic magic that allows them to cover their tracks and ensure cooperation from their enemies.

The limited nature of the reptoids’ shapechanging ability means an individual typically holds only one alias at a time and undertakes the process of changing its cover only if that identity has been compromised. In some cases, reptoids work behind the scenes to engineer “mysterious accidents” that allow them to discard problematic identities and assume new ones, and some conspiracy theorists or counterespionage officials tend to view high-profile deaths as signs of potential reptoid activity—either covert assassinations by the creatures, or staged deaths to cover for new identities. Reptoids are known to spend years in their assumed forms; some spend more of their lives as other creatures than in their natural forms.

Reptoid masters are the masterminds behind the race’s plots and infiltration, appearing rarely even in rumors and even less commonly encountered in the flesh. Reptoid masters command much more powerful domination magic than typical reptoids, ensuring their plots and identities remain hidden, and they are believed to be the leaders of this enigmatic race, though how they are chosen or made remains a mystery. No one in the Pact Worlds knows whether reptoid masters are the first to infiltrate a society and remain so effectively hidden that they are never uncovered, if they arrive on a planet only after other reptoids have established a power base, or if they remain distant from their kin and simply pull strings from some secure command center. This command center could be virtually anywhere in the galaxy—with some theories pointing to Absalom Station itself.

As might be expected, reptoids are secretive about the end goals of their infiltrations, and when under extreme duress, they choose to die rather than reveal information about their home world or race. Some posit they are weakening target societies in preparation for eventual invasion, while others argue they may already hold complete control, and thus have no need for an invasion, preferring to live like parasites within a host society.

Ryphorian Skyfire Pilot

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 5 XP: 1,600

NG Medium humanoid (ryphorian)

Init.: +5 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +17

Defense

HP: 63 RP: 4

EAC: 19 KAC: 20

Fort: +4 Ref: +7 Will: +8

Offense

Speed: 40 ft., fly 30 ft. (jetpack, average)

Melee: survival knife +10 (1d4+6 S)

Ranged: thunderstrike sonic pistol +12 (1d8+5 So; critical deafened [DC 15])

Offensive Abilities: debilitating trick, trick attack +3d8

Statistics

Str: +1 Dex: +5 Con: +0 Wis: +2 Int: +3 Cha: +1

Skills: Bluff +12, Culture +17, Engineering +12, Piloting +17, Survival +17

Languages: Common, Triaxian

Gear: estex suit II (jetpack, quick-release sheath), survival knife, thunderstrike sonic pistol with 4 batteries (20 charges each)

Ecology

Environment: any (Triaxus)

Organization: solitary, pair, bonded pair (1 skyfire pilot plus 1 dragonkin), or team (4–8 bonded pairs plus 2–4 ryphorian technicians)

Description

Ryphorians are the dominant humanoid race on the Pact Worlds planet of Triaxus, known for its highly eccentric orbit, which causes generations-long seasons. These humanoids have adapted to their unusual environment with a peculiar trimorphism: those generations born in the winter years (winterborn) manifest short fur and narrow eyes to protect against snow blindness, those born in the summer years (summerborn) have hairless skin in a variety of dark shades to protect them from the intense rays of the summer sun, and those born in the years between the extremes of summer and winter (transitional) have a blend of such traits. However, with gene therapy and hormonal treatments available, an individual ryphorian’s appearance is no longer an indicator of Triaxus’s current season, and while unmodified Triaxians are generally born in their winter form to reflect the planet’s current season, taking steps to change a ryphorian’s seasonal form is currently a mark of wealth and status in some cultures. Regardless of the season of their birth, ryphorians have long and pointed ears, with feather-like notching along the back edge that automatically moves and adjusts the ear’s shape to help the ryphorian focus on specific sounds.

Long ago, Triaxian society was defined by these seasonal changes. Winterborn ryphorians were understandably obsessed with survival, loyal but gruff and slow to make friends. Promises among winterborn were legendarily serious affairs, and modern Triaxian sagas and period romances still tell of heroes willing to sacrifice all to keep their word, regardless of the tragic consequences it might bring. Summerborn ryphorians, on the other hand, grew up in a time of plenty, abandoning their fortresses to wander as nomads. While most still understood the need to stockpile and prepare for the coming winter, summers were generally a time for passion and art, rebellion and risk. Transitional children, as representatives of the changing of seasons, were viewed with awe and fear.

Today, technological advancements have enabled modern ryphorians to live in ease despite Triaxus’s season, and even the cycle of biological adaptation has been broken by magic and technology. Yet this cycle still lives on in the stereotypes various ryphorian “generations” (as the different subspecies sometimes call themselves) have about each other—stereotypes ironically strengthened by the addition of personal choice into the matter. Winterborn ryphorians are still seen as inherently more conservative and pragmatic, not least because they represent the natural, unmodified state into which most ryphorians are born during the current winter season. Those who convert to summerborn have a reputation for flightiness and lust, artistic tendencies and passionate adherence to new ideas and social and technological progress. Though the process of conversion to summerborn is now generally accepted in most major ryphorian societies and summerborn serve in all levels of public office, the act of converting immediately brands an individual as a member of the counterculture—a badge most summerborn wear with pride. Transitional ryphorians remain relatively rare and thus still maintain some of their mystery, with many powerful mystics and leaders capitalizing on this status.

The ryphorians most often visible to other Pact Worlds citizens are the famed Skyfire Legion, elite mercenaries who offer their martial services to protect fledgling Pact Worlds colonies, Starfinder Society expeditions, and other such benevolent ventures operating beyond the legal reach of the Stewards and other Pact Worlds–based authorities. Many members of the legion form near-telepathic bonds with dragonkin partners (see page 40), a traditional, millennia-old practice that makes them particularly effective in team-based activities. These bonded pairs—sometimes romantic, but more often collegial—make crack combat pilot duos, whether serving on their own Skyfire Legion vessels or piloting ships for explorers as part of Legion contracts. Though particularly renowned for their abilities with both air and space craft, they’re also trained in other forms of combat, and can acquit themselves well on terrestrial battlefields when the situation calls for it, with some of them even maintaining the ancient practice of riding their dragonkin partners into battle. After the Skyfire Legion, the next ryphorian group to jump to most Pact Worlders’ minds is the famous battleflowers of Ning, genderless warriors who compete in broadcasted ritual combat, often attaining systemwide celebrity and renown.

Ryphorians’ relationships with true dragons are mixed, as their world has a long history of warfare between its tyrannical chromatic dragons and their armies of ryphorian slaves and the free ryphorian nations of the Allied Territories (aided by the noble metallic dragons). While the wars between dragons and ryphorians have officially ended, with some dragons trading battlefields for boardrooms, many ryphorians still retain a deep-seated cultural hatred for their former chromatic conquerors, and it’s not uncommon for ryphorian nationalists on Triaxus to conduct illegal attacks on draconic holdings in hopes of driving the evil dragons from their home world once and for all.

Ryphorian Technician

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 1 XP: 400

NG Medium humanoid (ryphorian)

Init.: +5 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +10

Defense

HP: 16

EAC: 12 KAC: 13

Fort: +3 Ref: +3 Will: +2

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: survival knife +4 (1d4+1 S)

Ranged: pulsecaster pistol +6 (1d4+1 E nonlethal)

Offensive Abilities: target tracking

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +1 Con: +2 Wis: +0 Int: +4 Cha: -1

Skills: Computers +10, Engineering +10, Physical Science +5, Piloting +10, Survival +5

Languages: Common, Triaxian

Gear: second skin, pulsecaster pistol with 2 batteries (20 charges each), survival knife

Ecology

Environment: any (Triaxus)

Organization: solitary, pair, or team (2–4 plus 4–8 bonded pairs [see below])

Description

Ryphorians are the dominant humanoid race on the Pact Worlds planet of Triaxus, known for its highly eccentric orbit, which causes generations-long seasons. These humanoids have adapted to their unusual environment with a peculiar trimorphism: those generations born in the winter years (winterborn) manifest short fur and narrow eyes to protect against snow blindness, those born in the summer years (summerborn) have hairless skin in a variety of dark shades to protect them from the intense rays of the summer sun, and those born in the years between the extremes of summer and winter (transitional) have a blend of such traits. However, with gene therapy and hormonal treatments available, an individual ryphorian’s appearance is no longer an indicator of Triaxus’s current season, and while unmodified Triaxians are generally born in their winter form to reflect the planet’s current season, taking steps to change a ryphorian’s seasonal form is currently a mark of wealth and status in some cultures. Regardless of the season of their birth, ryphorians have long and pointed ears, with feather-like notching along the back edge that automatically moves and adjusts the ear’s shape to help the ryphorian focus on specific sounds.

Long ago, Triaxian society was defined by these seasonal changes. Winterborn ryphorians were understandably obsessed with survival, loyal but gruff and slow to make friends. Promises among winterborn were legendarily serious affairs, and modern Triaxian sagas and period romances still tell of heroes willing to sacrifice all to keep their word, regardless of the tragic consequences it might bring. Summerborn ryphorians, on the other hand, grew up in a time of plenty, abandoning their fortresses to wander as nomads. While most still understood the need to stockpile and prepare for the coming winter, summers were generally a time for passion and art, rebellion and risk. Transitional children, as representatives of the changing of seasons, were viewed with awe and fear.

Today, technological advancements have enabled modern ryphorians to live in ease despite Triaxus’s season, and even the cycle of biological adaptation has been broken by magic and technology. Yet this cycle still lives on in the stereotypes various ryphorian “generations” (as the different subspecies sometimes call themselves) have about each other—stereotypes ironically strengthened by the addition of personal choice into the matter. Winterborn ryphorians are still seen as inherently more conservative and pragmatic, not least because they represent the natural, unmodified state into which most ryphorians are born during the current winter season. Those who convert to summerborn have a reputation for flightiness and lust, artistic tendencies and passionate adherence to new ideas and social and technological progress. Though the process of conversion to summerborn is now generally accepted in most major ryphorian societies and summerborn serve in all levels of public office, the act of converting immediately brands an individual as a member of the counterculture—a badge most summerborn wear with pride. Transitional ryphorians remain relatively rare and thus still maintain some of their mystery, with many powerful mystics and leaders capitalizing on this status.

The ryphorians most often visible to other Pact Worlds citizens are the famed Skyfire Legion, elite mercenaries who offer their martial services to protect fledgling Pact Worlds colonies, Starfinder Society expeditions, and other such benevolent ventures operating beyond the legal reach of the Stewards and other Pact Worlds–based authorities. Many members of the legion form near-telepathic bonds with dragonkin partners (see page 40), a traditional, millennia-old practice that makes them particularly effective in team-based activities. These bonded pairs—sometimes romantic, but more often collegial—make crack combat pilot duos, whether serving on their own Skyfire Legion vessels or piloting ships for explorers as part of Legion contracts. Though particularly renowned for their abilities with both air and space craft, they’re also trained in other forms of combat, and can acquit themselves well on terrestrial battlefields when the situation calls for it, with some of them even maintaining the ancient practice of riding their dragonkin partners into battle. After the Skyfire Legion, the next ryphorian group to jump to most Pact Worlders’ minds is the famous battleflowers of Ning, genderless warriors who compete in broadcasted ritual combat, often attaining systemwide celebrity and renown.

Ryphorians’ relationships with true dragons are mixed, as their world has a long history of warfare between its tyrannical chromatic dragons and their armies of ryphorian slaves and the free ryphorian nations of the Allied Territories (aided by the noble metallic dragons). While the wars between dragons and ryphorians have officially ended, with some dragons trading battlefields for boardrooms, many ryphorians still retain a deep-seated cultural hatred for their former chromatic conquerors, and it’s not uncommon for ryphorian nationalists on Triaxus to conduct illegal attacks on draconic holdings in hopes of driving the evil dragons from their home world once and for all.

Sarcesian Cybercommando

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 8 XP: 4,800

LN Large humanoid (sarcesian)

Init.: +5 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +16

Defense

HP: 110 RP: 4

EAC: 23 KAC: 24

Fort: +7 Ref: +7 Will: +11

Offense

Speed: 30 ft.

Melee: buzzblade dueling sword +15 (2d6+8 S)

Ranged: corona laser rifle +17 (2d6+8 F; critical burn 1d6) or screamer grenade II +17 (explode [20 ft., 2d10 So plus deafened 1d4 minutes, DC 18])

Offensive Abilities: target tracking, overload (DC 18)

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +6 Con: +0 Wis: +0 Int: +4 Cha: +2

Skills: Acrobatics +21, Computers +21, Engineering +21, Intimidate +16, Piloting +16

Languages: Common, Sarcesian

Gear: estex suit III, buzzblade dueling sword, corona laser rifle with 4 high-capacity batteries (40 charges each), screamer grenades II (5)

Ecology

Environment: any low-gravity (Diaspora)

Organization: solitary, pair, or regiment (3–5)

Special Abilities

Void Flyer (Su) A sarcesian can go 1 hour without breathing and can exist in a vacuum without suffering the associated environmental effects. By spending 1 Resolve Point, a sarcesian can extend this duration to a number of hours equal to her CR, or she can double that by spending 2 Resolve Points. When in a vacuum, sarcesians automatically grow wings made from pure energy that grant them a supernatural fly speed of 120 feet (average maneuverability) but that work only in a vacuum.

Description

Supposedly descended from the inhabitants of the two planets whose destruction long ago formed the Diaspora asteroid belt, sarcesians have adapted to low-gravity and thinair environments. Standing between 10 and 15 feet tall with bulbous eyes and spindly, elongated limbs, a sarcesian is able to adapt her physiology to survive in space by suspending her respiration and growing a pair of butterfly-like wings made of pure light. The wings act as solar sails, catching currents of radiation to propel her between the handful of inhabited asteroids and space platforms within the Diaspora.

Thanks to arcane engines left behind by the sarcesians’ ancestors, the race has long managed to maintain creche worlds—asteroids with enough magical atmosphere, gravity, and warmth for the inhabitants to live comfortably and raise offspring. Compared to some other planets in the Golarion system, sarcesian creche worlds are beautiful and idyllic. They contain fields, forests, hills, lakes, and bucolic towns whose populations number in the low thousands. Many of these sanctuaries are linked by the River Between, an unusual body of water that actually flows between and through the asteroids; the water is prevented from floating off into space by a tube-shaped force field crafted by unknown hands.

Sarcesians who leave the asteroid belt are sometimes hired as mercenaries specializing in surveillance and marksmanship, as they are accustomed to operating at vast distances from their targets. These sarcesians hone their innate patience even further in order to lie in wait for their marks for days atop bluffs, in dilapidated apartments, or even in the vacuum of space outside docking slips. Employers tend to pay well for this degree of dedication, making sarcesian snipers a highly sought-after commodity in certain areas of the galaxy.

Sarcesian Sniper

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 5 XP: 1,600

LN Large humanoid (sarcesian)

Init.: +5 Senses: low-light vision Perception: +17

Defense

HP: 64 RP: 4

EAC: 19 KAC: 20

Fort: +4 Ref: +9 Will: +8

Offense

Speed: 40 ft.

Melee: tactical dueling sword +10 (1d6+5 S)

Ranged: advanced Diasporan rifle +12 (2d8+5 F) or frag grenade II +12 (explode [15 ft., 2d6 P, DC 15])

Offensive Abilities: debilitating trick, trick attack +3d8

Statistics

Str: +0 Dex: +5 Con: +0 Wis: +0 Int: +3 Cha: +2

Skills: Acrobatics +17, Bluff +12, Computers +12, Stealth +17, Survival +12

Languages: Common, Sarcesian

Gear: estex suit II, advanced Diasporan rifle (see page 99) with 2 batteries (20 charges each), frag grenades II (4), tactical dueling sword

Ecology

Environment: any low-gravity (Diaspora)

Organization: solitary, pair, or squad (3–5)

Special Abilities

Void Flyer (Su) A sarcesian can go 1 hour without breathing and can exist in a vacuum without suffering the associated environmental effects. By spending 1 Resolve Point, a sarcesian can extend this duration to a number of hours equal to her CR, or she can double that by spending 2 Resolve Points. When in a vacuum, sarcesians automatically grow wings made from pure energy that grant them a supernatural fly speed of 120 feet (average maneuverability) but that work only in a vacuum.

Description

Supposedly descended from the inhabitants of the two planets whose destruction long ago formed the Diaspora asteroid belt, sarcesians have adapted to low-gravity and thinair environments. Standing between 10 and 15 feet tall with bulbous eyes and spindly, elongated limbs, a sarcesian is able to adapt her physiology to survive in space by suspending her respiration and growing a pair of butterfly-like wings made of pure light. The wings act as solar sails, catching currents of radiation to propel her between the handful of inhabited asteroids and space platforms within the Diaspora.

Thanks to arcane engines left behind by the sarcesians’ ancestors, the race has long managed to maintain creche worlds—asteroids with enough magical atmosphere, gravity, and warmth for the inhabitants to live comfortably and raise offspring. Compared to some other planets in the Golarion system, sarcesian creche worlds are beautiful and idyllic. They contain fields, forests, hills, lakes, and bucolic towns whose populations number in the low thousands. Many of these sanctuaries are linked by the River Between, an unusual body of water that actually flows between and through the asteroids; the water is prevented from floating off into space by a tube-shaped force field crafted by unknown hands.

Sarcesians who leave the asteroid belt are sometimes hired as mercenaries specializing in surveillance and marksmanship, as they are accustomed to operating at vast distances from their targets. These sarcesians hone their innate patience even further in order to lie in wait for their marks for days atop bluffs, in dilapidated apartments, or even in the vacuum of space outside docking slips. Employers tend to pay well for this degree of dedication, making sarcesian snipers a highly sought-after commodity in certain areas of the galaxy.

Scavenger Slime

Source: Alien Archive

CR: 9 XP: 6,400

N Large ooze

Init.: +3 Senses: blindsight (vibration) 60 ft., sightless Perception: +17

Defense

HP: 145

EAC: 22 KAC: 24